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Most-read articles are from the articles published in 2023 during the last three month.

Reviews
Metabolic Risk/Epidemiology
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Glucagon-Like Peptide-1: New Regulator in Lipid Metabolism
Tong Bu, Ziyan Sun, Yi Pan, Xia Deng, Guoyue Yuan
Diabetes Metab J. 2024;48(3):354-372.   Published online April 1, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2023.0277
  • 2,739 View
  • 278 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a 30-amino acid peptide hormone that is mainly expressed in the intestine and hypothalamus. In recent years, basic and clinical studies have shown that GLP-1 is closely related to lipid metabolism, and it can participate in lipid metabolism by inhibiting fat synthesis, promoting fat differentiation, enhancing cholesterol metabolism, and promoting adipose browning. GLP-1 plays a key role in the occurrence and development of metabolic diseases such as obesity, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and atherosclerosis by regulating lipid metabolism. It is expected to become a new target for the treatment of metabolic disorders. The effects of GLP-1 and dual agonists on lipid metabolism also provide a more complete treatment plan for metabolic diseases. This article reviews the recent research progress of GLP-1 in lipid metabolism.
Basic Research
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Adipose Tissue and Metabolic Health
Sung-Min An, Seung-Hee Cho, John C. Yoon
Diabetes Metab J. 2023;47(5):595-611.   Published online July 24, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2023.0011
  • 5,895 View
  • 550 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
In this review, we provide a brief synopsis of the connections between adipose tissue and metabolic health and highlight some recent developments in understanding and exploiting adipocyte biology. Adipose tissue plays critical roles in the regulation of systemic glucose and lipid metabolism and secretes bioactive molecules possessing endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine functions. Dysfunctional adipose tissue has a detrimental impact on metabolic health and is intimately involved in key aspects of metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance, lipid overload, inflammation, and organelle stress. Differences in the distribution of fat depots and adipose characteristics relate to divergent degrees of metabolic dysfunction found in metabolically healthy and unhealthy obese individuals. Thermogenic adipocytes increase energy expenditure via mitochondrial uncoupling or adenosine triphosphate-consuming futile substrate cycles, while functioning as a metabolic sink and participating in crosstalk with other metabolic organs. Manipulation of adipose tissue provides a wealth of opportunities to intervene and combat the progression of associated metabolic diseases. We discuss current treatment modalities for obesity including incretin hormone analogs and touch upon emerging strategies with therapeutic potential including exosome-based therapy, pharmacological activation of brown and beige adipocyte thermogenesis, and administration or inhibition of adipocyte-derived factors.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Pharmacological targets at the lysosomal autophagy–NLRP3 inflammasome crossroads
    Srinivasa Reddy Bonam, Dylan Mastrippolito, Philippe Georgel, Sylviane Muller
    Trends in Pharmacological Sciences.2024; 45(1): 81.     CrossRef
  • Senescent adipocytes and type 2 diabetes – current knowledge and perspective concepts
    Weronika Kruczkowska, Julia Gałęziewska, Mateusz Kciuk, Adrianna Gielecińska, Elżbieta Płuciennik, Zbigniew Pasieka, Lin-Yong Zhao, Yi-Jin Yu, Damian Kołat, Żaneta Kałuzińska-Kołat
    Biomolecular Concepts.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Visceral Adipose Tissue: The Hidden Culprit for Type 2 Diabetes
    Sneha Dhokte, Krzysztof Czaja
    Nutrients.2024; 16(7): 1015.     CrossRef
  • Beyond the Cold: Activating Brown Adipose Tissue as an Approach to Combat Obesity
    Cristina Elena Negroiu, Iulia Tudorașcu, Cristina Maria Bezna, Sanziana Godeanu, Marina Diaconu, Raluca Danoiu, Suzana Danoiu
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2024; 13(7): 1973.     CrossRef
  • Differential Modulation by Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) and Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) of Mesenteric Fat and Macrophages and T Cells in Adipose Tissue of Obese fa/fa Zucker Rats
    Lena Hong, Peter Zahradka, Carla G. Taylor
    Nutrients.2024; 16(9): 1311.     CrossRef
  • Omics Insights into Epicardial Adipose Tissue: Unravelling Its Molecular Landscape
    Ivona Mitu, Roxana Popescu, Cristina-Daniela Dimitriu, Radu-Ștefan Miftode, Irina-Iuliana Costache, Ovidiu Mitu
    Applied Sciences.2024; 14(10): 4173.     CrossRef
  • White-to-Beige and Back: Adipocyte Conversion and Transcriptional Reprogramming
    Stanislav Boychenko, Vera S. Egorova, Andrew Brovin, Alexander D. Egorov
    Pharmaceuticals.2024; 17(6): 790.     CrossRef
Lifestyle
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Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Sarcopenia as Comorbid Chronic Diseases in Older Adults: Established and Emerging Treatments and Therapies
Jakub Mesinovic, Jackson J. Fyfe, Jason Talevski, Michael J. Wheeler, Gloria K.W. Leung, Elena S. George, Melkamu T. Hunegnaw, Costas Glavas, Paul Jansons, Robin M. Daly, David Scott
Diabetes Metab J. 2023;47(6):719-742.   Published online September 14, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2023.0112
  • 6,364 View
  • 504 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and sarcopenia (low skeletal muscle mass and function) share a bidirectional relationship. The prevalence of these diseases increases with age and they share common risk factors. Skeletal muscle fat infiltration, commonly referred to as myosteatosis, may be a major contributor to both T2DM and sarcopenia in older adults via independent effects on insulin resistance and muscle health. Many strategies to manage T2DM result in energy restriction and subsequent weight loss, and this can lead to significant declines in muscle mass in the absence of resistance exercise, which is also a first-line treatment for sarcopenia. In this review, we highlight recent evidence on established treatments and emerging therapies targeting weight loss and muscle mass and function improvements in older adults with, or at risk of, T2DM and/or sarcopenia. This includes dietary, physical activity and exercise interventions, new generation incretin-based agonists and myostatin-based antagonists, and endoscopic bariatric therapies. We also highlight how digital health technologies and health literacy interventions can increase uptake of, and adherence to, established and emerging treatments and therapies in older adults with T2DM and/or sarcopenia.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Fucoidan ameliorates diabetic skeletal muscle atrophy through PI3K/Akt pathway
    Caixia Li, Yaping Liu, Mingzhi Yang, Haoyue Huang, Lulu Tang, Yufan Miao, Wenjie Li, Xing Li
    Journal of Functional Foods.2024; 114: 106076.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of the effect of testosterone replacement therapy with a transdermal testosterone on glycemic control in men with type 2 diabetes mellitus
    R. V. Rozhivanov, M. O. Chernova, V. A. Ioutsi, G. A. Mel’nichenko, M. V. Shestakova, E. R. Rozhivanova, E. N. Andreeva, N. G. Mokrysheva
    Diabetes mellitus.2024; 27(2): 120.     CrossRef
  • Higher dietary live microbe intake is associated with a lower risk of sarcopenia
    Kemin Yan, Xiaoyi Ma, Chen Li, Xiang Zhang, Manxuan Shen, Sai Chen, Jia Zhao, Wen He, Hua Hong, Yingying Gong, Gang Yuan
    Clinical Nutrition.2024; 43(7): 1675.     CrossRef
  • d-Pinitol Improves Diabetic Sarcopenia by Regulation of the Gut Microbiome, Metabolome, and Proteome in STZ-Induced SAMP8 Mice
    Xin Yu, Pei Li, Baoying Li, Fei Yu, Wenqian Zhao, Xue Wang, Yajuan Wang, Haiqing Gao, Mei Cheng, Xiaoli Li
    Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.2024; 72(25): 14466.     CrossRef
Guideline/Fact Sheet
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2023 Clinical Practice Guidelines for Diabetes Mellitus of the Korean Diabetes Association
Jong Han Choi, Kyung Ae Lee, Joon Ho Moon, Suk Chon, Dae Jung Kim, Hyun Jin Kim, Nan Hee Kim, Ji A Seo, Mee Kyoung Kim, Jeong Hyun Lim, YoonJu Song, Ye Seul Yang, Jae Hyeon Kim, You-Bin Lee, Junghyun Noh, Kyu Yeon Hur, Jong Suk Park, Sang Youl Rhee, Hae Jin Kim, Hyun Min Kim, Jung Hae Ko, Nam Hoon Kim, Chong Hwa Kim, Jeeyun Ahn, Tae Jung Oh, Soo-Kyung Kim, Jaehyun Kim, Eugene Han, Sang-Man Jin, Won Suk Choi, Min Kyong Moon, Committee of Clinical Practice Guidelines, Korean Diabetes Association
Diabetes Metab J. 2023;47(5):575-594.   Published online September 26, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2023.0282
  • 6,778 View
  • 840 Download
  • 14 Web of Science
  • 21 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
In May 2023, the Committee of Clinical Practice Guidelines of the Korean Diabetes Association published the revised clinical practice guidelines for Korean adults with diabetes and prediabetes. We incorporated the latest clinical research findings through a comprehensive systematic literature review and applied them in a manner suitable for the Korean population. These guidelines are designed for all healthcare providers nationwide, including physicians, diabetes experts, and certified diabetes educators who manage patients with diabetes or individuals at risk of developing diabetes. Based on recent changes in international guidelines and the results of a Korean epidemiological study, the recommended age for diabetes screening has been lowered. In collaboration with the relevant Korean medical societies, recently revised guidelines for managing hypertension and dyslipidemia in patients with diabetes have been incorporated into this guideline. An abridgment containing practical information on patient education and systematic management in the clinic was published separately.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Mortality in metabolic dysfunction-associated steatotic liver disease: A nationwide population-based cohort study
    Eugene Han, Byung-Wan Lee, Eun Seok Kang, Bong-Soo Cha, Sang Hoon Ahn, Yong-ho Lee, Seung Up Kim
    Metabolism.2024; 152: 155789.     CrossRef
  • Letter by In-Kyung Jeong Regarding Article, Trends in Prevalence of Hypertriglyceridemia and Related Factors in Korean Adults: A Serial Cross-Sectional Study
    In-Kyung Jeong
    Journal of Lipid and Atherosclerosis.2024; 13(1): 80.     CrossRef
  • Association between cardiovascular disease risk and incident type 2 diabetes mellitus in individuals with prediabetes: A retrospective cohort study
    Myung Jin Kim, Yun Kyung Cho, Chang Hee Jung, Woo Je Lee
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice.2024; 208: 111125.     CrossRef
  • Korea Hypertension Fact Sheet 2023: analysis of nationwide population-based data with a particular focus on hypertension in special populations
    Hyeon Chang Kim, Hokyou Lee, Hyeok-Hee Lee, Dasom Son, Minsung Cho, Sojung Shin, Yeeun Seo, Eun-Jin kim, Song Vogue Ahn, Sun Ha Jee, Sungha Park, Hae-Young Lee, Min Ho Shin, Sang-Hyun Ihm, Seung Won Lee, Jong Ku Park, Il Suh, Tae-Yong Lee
    Clinical Hypertension.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Diabetes Duration, Cholesterol Levels, and Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases in Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes
    Mee Kyoung Kim, Kyu Na Lee, Kyungdo Han, Seung-Hwan Lee
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of Adding Apolipoprotein B Testing on the Prevalence of Dyslipidemia and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in the Korean Adult Population
    Rihwa Choi, Sang Gon Lee, Eun Hee Lee
    Metabolites.2024; 14(3): 169.     CrossRef
  • A self-powered and supercapacitive microneedle continuous glucose monitoring system with a wide range of glucose detection capabilities
    Hye-Jun Kil, Jang Hyeon Kim, Kanghae Lee, Tae-Uk Kang, Ju-Hyun Yoo, Yong-ho Lee, Jin-Woo Park
    Biosensors and Bioelectronics.2024; 257: 116297.     CrossRef
  • Cardiorenal outcomes and mortality after sodium‐glucose cotransporter‐2 inhibitor initiation in type 2 diabetes patients with percutaneous coronary intervention history
    Jin Hwa Kim, Young Sang Lyu, BongSeong Kim, Mee Kyung Kim, Sang Yong Kim, Ki‐Hyun Baek, Ki‐Ho Song, Kyungdo Han, Hyuk‐Sang Kwon
    Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.2024; 26(7): 2567.     CrossRef
  • SGLT2i impact on HCC incidence in patients with fatty liver disease and diabetes: a nation-wide cohort study in South Korea
    Hyo Jung Cho, Eunyoung Lee, Soon Sun Kim, Jae Youn Cheong
    Scientific Reports.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The importance of diabetes mellitus in dental practice
    Nina Dimitrijević-Jovanović, Hristina Ugrinović, Radomir Mitić, Nevena Kalezić
    Galenika Medical Journal.2024; 3(9): 80.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of glycemic response of ten local meals commonly consumed from Chad
    Zoufane Guedeungbe, Jean Paul Bayang, Benoît Bargui Koubala
    Journal of Agriculture and Food Research.2024; 17: 101251.     CrossRef
  • Glycemic Control and Oral Health Outcomes in Patients With Diabetes: Insights From a Nationwide Korean Survey
    Song-Yi Yu, Sun-Kyung Lee, Bumhee Yang, Hyun Lee, Hyun Jeong Jeon, Dong-Hwa Lee
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Efficacy and safety of albiglutide, a once-weekly glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, in patients with type 2 diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    A.B.M. Kamrul-Hasan, Deep Dutta, Lakshmi Nagendra, Saptarshi Bhattacharya, Rajiv Singla, Sanjay Kalra
    Medicine.2024; 103(25): e38568.     CrossRef
  • Longitudinal Analysis of Diabetes Mellitus Risk: Smoking Status and Smoking Cessation
    Da-Eun Sung, Seung-Jae Lee, Mi-Yeon Lee, Eun-Jung Rhee, Ki-Chul Sung
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2024; 13(13): 3927.     CrossRef
  • Current type 2 diabetes guidelines: Individualized treatment and how to make the most of metformin
    Juliana C. N. Chan, Aimin Yang, Natural Chu, Elaine Chow
    Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Management of Dyslipidemia in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus
    Kyung Ae Lee
    The Journal of Korean Diabetes.2023; 24(3): 111.     CrossRef
  • 2023 Clinical Practice Guidelines for Diabetes: Recommendations for Pharmacological Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes
    Junghyun Noh
    The Journal of Korean Diabetes.2023; 24(3): 127.     CrossRef
  • 2023 Clinical Practice Guidelines for Diabetes
    Min Kyong Moon
    The Journal of Korean Diabetes.2023; 24(3): 120.     CrossRef
  • 2023 Clinical Practice Guidelines for Diabetes: Management of Cardiovascular Risk Factors
    Ye Seul Yang
    The Journal of Korean Diabetes.2023; 24(3): 135.     CrossRef
  • A 33-Year-Old Man Presented with Abdominal Pain and Vomiting Starting a Day Ago
    Jong Han Choi
    The Korean Journal of Medicine.2023; 98(6): 289.     CrossRef
  • Comorbidity Patterns and Management in Inpatients with Endocrine Diseases by Age Groups in South Korea: Nationwide Data
    Sung-Soo Kim, Hun-Sung Kim
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2023; 14(1): 42.     CrossRef
Pathophysiology
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Primordial Drivers of Diabetes Heart Disease: Comprehensive Insights into Insulin Resistance
Yajie Fan, Zhipeng Yan, Tingting Li, Aolin Li, Xinbiao Fan, Zhongwen Qi, Junping Zhang
Diabetes Metab J. 2024;48(1):19-36.   Published online January 3, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2023.0110
  • 3,844 View
  • 208 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Insulin resistance has been regarded as a hallmark of diabetes heart disease (DHD). Numerous studies have shown that insulin resistance can affect blood circulation and myocardium, which indirectly cause cardiac hypertrophy and ventricular remodeling, participating in the pathogenesis of DHD. Meanwhile, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and hyperlipidemia associated with insulin resistance can directly impair the metabolism and function of the heart. Targeting insulin resistance is a potential therapeutic strategy for the prevention of DHD. Currently, the role of insulin resistance in the pathogenic development of DHD is still under active research, as the pathological roles involved are complex and not yet fully understood, and the related therapeutic approaches are not well developed. In this review, we describe insulin resistance and add recent advances in the major pathological and physiological changes and underlying mechanisms by which insulin resistance leads to myocardial remodeling and dysfunction in the diabetic heart, including exosomal dysfunction, ferroptosis, and epigenetic factors. In addition, we discuss potential therapeutic approaches to improve insulin resistance and accelerate the development of cardiovascular protection drugs.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association between METS-IR and heart failure: a cross-sectional study
    Xiaozhou Su, Chunli Zhao, Xianwei Zhang
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
Complications
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Pharmacological and Nonpharmacological Treatments for Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy
Han Na Jang, Tae Jung Oh
Diabetes Metab J. 2023;47(6):743-756.   Published online September 6, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2023.0018
  • 5,588 View
  • 626 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is one of the most prevalent chronic complications of diabetes. The lifetime prevalence of DPN is thought to be >50%, and 15%–25% of patients with diabetes experience neuropathic pain, referred to as “painful DPN.” Appropriate treatment of painful DPN is important because this pain contributes to a poor quality of life by causing sleep disturbance, anxiety, and depression. The basic principle for the management of painful DPN is to control hyperglycemia and other modifiable risk factors, but these may be insufficient for preventing or improving DPN. Because there is no promising diseasemodifying medication for DPN, the pain itself needs to be managed when treating painful DPN. Drugs for neuropathic pain, such as gabapentinoids, serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, alpha-lipoic acid, sodium channel blockers, and topical capsaicin, are used for the management of painful DPN. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved pregabalin, duloxetine, tapentadol, and the 8% capsaicin patch as drugs for the treatment of painful DPN. Recently, spinal cord stimulation using electrical stimulation is approved by the FDA for the treatment for painful DPN. This review describes the currently available pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments for painful DPN.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • J-2156, a small molecule somatostatin type 4 receptor agonist, alleviated hindpaw hypersensitivity in the streptozotocin-induced rat model of painful diabetic neuropathy but with a 2-fold decrease in potency at an advanced stage in the model, mimicking mo
    A. Kuo, M. Z. Imam, R. Li, L. Lin, A. Raboczyj, A. E. Bohmer, J. R. Nicholson, L. Corradini, M. T. Smith
    Frontiers in Pharmacology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Chronic Wound–Related Pain Model
    Kevin Woo
    Clinics in Geriatric Medicine.2024; 40(3): 501.     CrossRef
  • Diabetic Neuropathy: A Guide to Pain Management
    Emily X. Zhang, Cyrus Yazdi, Rahib K. Islam, Ahmed I. Anwar, Alana Alvares-Amado, Horace Townsend, Kaitlyn E. Allen, Elena Plakotaris, Jon D. Hirsch, Ross G. Rieger, Varsha Allampalli, Jamal Hasoon, Kazi N. Islam, Sahar Shekoohi, Alan D. Kaye, Christopher
    Current Pain and Headache Reports.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Expert opinion on screening, diagnosis and management of diabetic peripheral neuropathy: a multidisciplinary approach
    Aysegul Atmaca, Aysegul Ketenci, Ibrahim Sahin, Ihsan Sukru Sengun, Ramazan Ilyas Oner, Hacer Erdem Tilki, Mine Adas, Hatice Soyleli, Tevfik Demir
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Predicting the efficacy of rehabilitation in patients with type 2 diabetes and diabetic polyneuropathy
    T.H. Bakaliuk, N.R. Makarchuk, H.O. Stelmakh, V.I. Pankiv, I.I. Kamyshna
    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENDOCRINOLOGY (Ukraine).2024; 20(3): 155.     CrossRef
  • Xiaoke Bitong capsule alleviates inflammatory impairment via inhibition of the TNF signaling pathway to against diabetic peripheral neuropathy
    Lulu Tian, Meiqi Yang, Shanjie Tu, Kaixin Chang, Huanyu Jiang, Yuwei Jiang, Lu Ding, Zhiwei Weng, Yueqiang Wang, Xiaolong Tan, Chunxiao Zong, Buyang Chen, Xiaobing Dou, Xiuge Wang, Xuchen Qi
    Phytomedicine.2024; : 155867.     CrossRef
Sulwon Lecture 2023
Metabolic Risk/Epidemiology
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Insulin Resistance, Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Clinical and Experimental Perspective
Inha Jung, Dae-Jeong Koo, Won-Young Lee
Diabetes Metab J. 2024;48(3):327-339.   Published online February 2, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2023.0350
  • 2,505 View
  • 295 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
It has been generally accepted that insulin resistance (IR) and reduced insulin secretory capacity are the basic pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In addition to genetic factors, the persistence of systemic inflammation caused by obesity and the associated threat of lipotoxicity increase the risk of T2DM. In particular, the main cause of IR is obesity and subjects with T2DM have a higher body mass index (BMI) than normal subjects according to recent studies. The prevalence of T2DM with IR has increased with increasing BMI during the past three decades. According to recent studies, homeostatic model assessment of IR was increased compared to that of the 1990s. Rising prevalence of obesity in Korea have contributed to the development of IR, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and T2DM and cutting this vicious cycle is important. My colleagues and I have investigated this pathogenic mechanism on this theme through clinical and experimental studies over 20 years and herein, I would like to summarize some of our studies with deep gratitude for receiving the prestigious 2023 Sulwon Award.
Reviews
Metabolic Risk/Epidemiology
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Hepatic Fibrosis and Cancer: The Silent Threats of Metabolic Syndrome
Scott L. Friedman
Diabetes Metab J. 2024;48(2):161-169.   Published online January 26, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2023.0240
  • 3,803 View
  • 372 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Metabolic dysfunction-associated steatotic (fatty) liver disease (MASLD), previously termed non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, is a worldwide epidemic that can lead to hepatic inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The disease is typically a component of the metabolic syndrome that accompanies obesity, and is often overlooked because the liver manifestations are clinically silent until late-stage disease is present (i.e., cirrhosis). Moreover, Asian populations, including Koreans, have a higher fraction of patients who are lean, yet their illness has the same prognosis or worse than those who are obese. Nonetheless, ongoing injury can lead to hepatic inflammation and ballooning of hepatocytes as classic features. Over time, fibrosis develops following activation of hepatic stellate cells, the liver’s main fibrogenic cell type. The disease is usually more advanced in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, indicating that all diabetic patients should be screened for liver disease. Although there has been substantial progress in clarifying pathways of injury and fibrosis, there no approved therapies yet, but current research seeks to uncover the pathways driving hepatic inflammation and fibrosis, in hopes of identifying new therapeutic targets. Emerging molecular methods, especially single cell sequencing technologies, are revolutionizing our ability to clarify mechanisms underlying MASLD-associated fibrosis and HCC.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Prognostic Impact of Metabolic Syndrome and Steatotic Liver Disease in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Using Machine Learning Techniques
    Sergio Gil-Rojas, Miguel Suárez, Pablo Martínez-Blanco, Ana M. Torres, Natalia Martínez-García, Pilar Blasco, Miguel Torralba, Jorge Mateo
    Metabolites.2024; 14(6): 305.     CrossRef
  • Interplay between YAP/TAZ and metabolic dysfunction-associated steatotic liver disease progression
    Na Young Lee, Myeung Gi Choi, Eui Jin Lee, Ja Hyun Koo
    Archives of Pharmacal Research.2024; 47(6): 558.     CrossRef
Complications
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Dyslipidemia in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: An Updated Overview
Sang Heon Suh, Soo Wan Kim
Diabetes Metab J. 2023;47(5):612-629.   Published online July 24, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2023.0067
  • 4,576 View
  • 521 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Dyslipidemia is a potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Whereas the recommendations for the treatment target of dyslipidemia in the general population are being more and more rigorous, the 2013 Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes clinical practice guideline for lipid management in chronic kidney disease (CKD) presented a relatively conservative approach with respect to the indication of lipid lowering therapy and therapeutic monitoring among the patients with CKD. This may be largely attributed to the lack of high-quality evidence derived from CKD population, among whom the overall feature of dyslipidemia is considerably distinctive to that of general population. In this review article, we cover the characteristic features of dyslipidemia and impact of dyslipidemia on cardiovascular outcomes in patients with CKD. We also review the current evidence on lipid lowering therapy to modify the risk of cardiovascular events in this population. We finally discuss the association between dyslipidemia and CKD progression and the potential strategy to delay the progression of CKD in relation to lipid lowering therapy.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Statin Therapy and Lipid Indices in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Control Trials
    Jafar Karami, Bahman Razi, Danyal Imani, Saeed Aslani, Mahdi Pakjoo, Mahdieh Fasihi, Keyhan Mohammadi, Amirhossein Sahebkar
    Current Pharmaceutical Design.2024; 30(5): 362.     CrossRef
  • Lipoprotein glomerulopathy with markedly increased arterial stiffness successfully treated with a combination of fenofibrate and losartan: a case report
    Junichiro Kato, Hideo Okonogi, Go Kanzaki, Haruki Katsumata, Yasuyuki Nakada, Makoto Sagasaki, Kazumasa Komine, Kenji Ito, Takao Saito, Akira Matsunaga, Koh Tokutou, Kazuho Honda, Nobuo Tsuboi, Takashi Yokoo
    BMC Nephrology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Atherogenic index of plasma: a new indicator for assessing the short-term mortality of patients with acute decompensated heart failure
    Meng Yu, Hongyi Yang, Maobin Kuang, Jiajun Qiu, Changhui Yu, Guobo Xie, Guotai Sheng, Yang Zou
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
Sulwon Lecture 2022
Others
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Opening the Precision Diabetes Care through Digital Healthcare
Joonyub Lee, Jin Yu, Kun-Ho Yoon
Diabetes Metab J. 2023;47(3):307-314.   Published online March 29, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2022.0386
  • 6,778 View
  • 258 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
The national healthcare systems of every country in the world cannot sustain the rise in healthcare expenditure caused by chronic diseases and their complications. To sustain the national healthcare system, a novel system should be developed to improve the quality of care and minimize healthcare costs. For 20 years, our team developed patient-communicating digital healthcare platforms and proved their efficacy. National scale randomized control trials are underway to systematically measure the efficacy and economic benefits of this digital health care system. Precision medicine aims to maximize effectiveness of disease management by considering individual variability. Digital health technologies enable precision medicine at a reasonable cost that was not available before. The government launched the “National Integrated Bio-big Data Project” which will collect diverse health data from the participants. Individuals will share their health information to physicians or researchers at their will by gateway named “My-Healthway.’ Taken together, now we stand in front of the evolution of medical care, so-called “Precision medicine.” led by various kinds of technologies and a huge amount of health information exchange. We should lead these new trends as pioneers, not as followers, to establish and implement the best care for our patients that can help them to withstand their devastating diseases.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Technological Innovations Transforming Diabetes Care in Practice
    Shinae Kang
    The Journal of Korean Diabetes.2024; 25(2): 57.     CrossRef
Reviews
Technology/Device
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Advances in Continuous Glucose Monitoring and Integrated Devices for Management of Diabetes with Insulin-Based Therapy: Improvement in Glycemic Control
Jee Hee Yoo, Jae Hyeon Kim
Diabetes Metab J. 2023;47(1):27-41.   Published online January 12, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2022.0271
  • 7,715 View
  • 417 Download
  • 14 Web of Science
  • 21 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) technology has evolved over the past decade with the integration of various devices including insulin pumps, connected insulin pens (CIPs), automated insulin delivery (AID) systems, and virtual platforms. CGM has shown consistent benefits in glycemic outcomes in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treated with insulin. Moreover, the combined effect of CGM and education have been shown to improve glycemic outcomes more than CGM alone. Now a CIP is the expected future technology that does not need to be worn all day like insulin pumps and helps to calculate insulin doses with a built-in bolus calculator. Although only a few clinical trials have assessed the effectiveness of CIPs, they consistently show benefits in glycemic outcomes by reducing missed doses of insulin and improving problematic adherence. AID systems and virtual platforms made it possible to achieve target glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetes while minimizing hypoglycemia, which has always been challenging in T1DM. Now fully automatic AID systems and tools for diabetes decisions based on artificial intelligence are in development. These advances in technology could reduce the burden associated with insulin treatment for diabetes.

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Metabolic Risk/Epidemiology
Article image
Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Its Implications across the Life Span
Brandy Wicklow, Ravi Retnakaran
Diabetes Metab J. 2023;47(3):333-344.   Published online February 8, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2022.0348
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has historically been perceived as a medical complication of pregnancy that also serves as a harbinger of maternal risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the future. In recent decades, a growing body of evidence has detailed additional lifelong implications that extend beyond T2DM, including an elevated risk of ultimately developing cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, the risk factors that mediate this lifetime cardiovascular risk are evident not only after delivery but are present even before the pregnancy in which GDM is first diagnosed. The concept thus emerging from these data is that the diagnosis of GDM enables the identification of women who are already on an enhanced track of cardiometabolic risk that starts early in life. Studies of the offspring of pregnancies complicated by diabetes now suggest that the earliest underpinnings of this cardiometabolic risk profile may be determined in utero and may first manifest clinically in childhood. Accordingly, from this perspective, GDM is now seen as a chronic metabolic disorder that holds implications across the life span of both mother and child.

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Original Articles
Basic research
Article image
Reducing Oxidative Stress and Inflammation by Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 4 Inhibition Is Important in Prevention of Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Diabetic Mice
Ah Reum Khang, Dong Hun Kim, Min-Ji Kim, Chang Joo Oh, Jae-Han Jeon, Sung Hee Choi, In-Kyu Lee
Diabetes Metab J. 2024;48(3):405-417.   Published online February 1, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2023.0196
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammation are reported to have a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury, a leading cause of acute kidney injury. The present study investigated the role of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) in ROS production and inflammation following IR injury.
Methods
We used a streptozotocin-induced diabetic C57BL6/J mouse model, which was subjected to IR by clamping both renal pedicles. Cellular apoptosis and inflammatory markers were evaluated in NRK-52E cells and mouse primary tubular cells after hypoxia and reoxygenation using a hypoxia work station.
Results
Following IR injury in diabetic mice, the expression of PDK4, rather than the other PDK isoforms, was induced with a marked increase in pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α (PDHE1α) phosphorylation. This was accompanied by a pronounced ROS activation, as well as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) production. Notably, sodium dichloroacetate (DCA) attenuated renal IR injury-induced apoptosis which can be attributed to reducing PDK4 expression and PDHE1α phosphorylation levels. DCA or shPdk4 treatment reduced oxidative stress and decreased TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and MCP-1 production after IR or hypoxia-reoxygenation injury.
Conclusion
PDK4 inhibition alleviated renal injury with decreased ROS production and inflammation, supporting a critical role for PDK4 in IR mediated damage. This result indicates another potential target for reno-protection during IR injury; accordingly, the role of PDK4 inhibition needs to be comprehensively elucidated in terms of mitochondrial function during renal IR injury.

Citations

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  • Exploring Renal Pyruvate Metabolism as a Therapeutic Avenue for Diabetic Kidney Injury
    Jaemin Lee
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2024; 48(3): 385.     CrossRef
  • Cardiovascular Disease and miRNAs: Possible Oxidative Stress-Regulating Roles of miRNAs
    Seahyoung Lee
    Antioxidants.2024; 13(6): 656.     CrossRef
Drug/Regimen
Article image
Comparative Efficacy of Rosuvastatin Monotherapy and Rosuvastatin/Ezetimibe Combination Therapy on Insulin Sensitivity and Vascular Inflammatory Response in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Ji Hye Han, Kyong Hye Joung, Jun Choul Lee, Ok Soon Kim, Sorim Choung, Ji Min Kim, Yea Eun Kang, Hyon-Seung Yi, Ju Hee Lee, Bon Jeong Ku, Hyun Jin Kim
Diabetes Metab J. 2024;48(1):112-121.   Published online January 3, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2022.0402
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) induces endothelial dysfunction and inflammation, which are the main factors for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. The present study aimed to compare the effects of rosuvastatin monotherapy and rosuvastatin/ezetimibe combination therapy on lipid profile, insulin sensitivity, and vascular inflammatory response in patients with T2DM.
Methods
A total of 101 patients with T2DM and dyslipidemia were randomized to either rosuvastatin monotherapy (5 mg/day, n=47) or rosuvastatin/ezetimibe combination therapy (5 mg/10 mg/day, n=45) and treated for 12 weeks. Serum lipids, glucose, insulin, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), and peroxiredoxin 4 (PRDX4) levels were determined before and after 12 weeks of treatment.
Results
The reduction in low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) by more than 50% from baseline after treatment was more in the combination therapy group. The serum sICAM-1 levels increased significantly in both groups, but there was no difference between the two groups. The significant changes in homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and PRDX4 were confirmed only in the subgroup in which LDL-C was reduced by 50% or more in the combination therapy group. However, after adjusting for diabetes mellitus duration and hypertension, the changes in HOMA-IR and PRDX4 were not significant between the two groups.
Conclusion
Although rosuvastatin/ezetimibe combination therapy had a greater LDL-C reduction effect than rosuvastatin monotherapy, it had no additional effects on insulin sensitivity and vascular inflammatory response. Further studies are needed on the effect of long-term treatment with ezetimibe on insulin sensitivity and vascular inflammatory response.

Citations

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  • Combining Ezetimibe and Rosuvastatin: Impacts on Insulin Sensitivity and Vascular Inflammation in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
    Eun Roh
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2024; 48(1): 55.     CrossRef
  • Does Rosuvastatin/Ezetimibe Combination Therapy Offer Potential Benefits for Glucose Metabolism beyond Lipid-Lowering Efficacy in T2DM?
    Il Rae Park, Jun Sung Moon
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2024; 48(3): 387.     CrossRef
  • A Comparison of Rosuvastatin Monotherapy and Rosuvastatin Plus Ezetimibe Combination Therapy in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials
    Samuel K Dadzie, Godfrey Tabowei, Mandeep Kaur, Saeed Ahmed, Aayushi Thakur, Khaldoun Khreis, Monika Bai, Adil Amin
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Review
Basic Research
Article image
Mitochondrial-Encoded Peptide MOTS-c, Diabetes, and Aging-Related Diseases
Byung Soo Kong, Changhan Lee, Young Min Cho
Diabetes Metab J. 2023;47(3):315-324.   Published online February 24, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2022.0333
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Mitochondria are complex metabolic organelles with manifold pathophysiological implications in diabetes. Currently published mitochondrial-encoded peptides, which are expressed from the mitochondrial open reading frame of the 12S ribosomal RNA type-c (MOTS-c), 16S rRNA (humanin and short humanin like peptide 1-6 [SHLP1-6]), or small human mitochondrial open reading frame over serine tRNA (SHMOOSE) are associated with regulation of cellular metabolism and insulin action in age-related diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review focuses mainly on recent advances in MOTS-c research with regards to diabetes, including both type 1 and type 2. The emerging understanding of MOTS-c in diabetes may provide insight into the development of new therapies for diabetes and other age or senescence-related diseases.

Citations

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  • Mitochondrial-derived peptides: Antidiabetic functions and evolutionary perspectives
    Satadeepa Kal, Sumana Mahata, Suborno Jati, Sushil K. Mahata
    Peptides.2024; 172: 171147.     CrossRef
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    Benyuan Zhang, Joon Young Chang, Min Hee Lee, Sang-Hyeon Ju, Hyon-Seung Yi, Minho Shong
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    Alejandra María Rivera Nieves, Brian Michael Wauford, Accalia Fu
    Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef

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