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Original Articles
Cardiovascular risk/Epidemiology
Risk of Cardiovascular Disease according to Baseline Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Level in Different Age Groups in Korean Diabetes Population: A Cohort Study
Tae Kyung Yoo, Kyung-Do Han, Eun-Jung Rhee, Won-Young Lee
Diabetes Metab J. 2024;48(2):265-278.   Published online February 26, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2022.0443
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
The association between low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) levels and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in different age groups within the diabetes mellitus (DM) population remains unclear. The cohort study was conducted to investigate this relationship.
Methods
We assessed the 2009 to 2012 Korean National Health Screening and National Health Insurance Service records, with follow-up to the primary outcome (myocardial infarction [MI] or stroke) or December 2018. After excluding the participants with a history of MI or stroke, 2,227,394 participants with DM were included and categorized according to baseline LDL-C levels and age. Cox proportional hazards modeling was conducted. The CVD risk of age <40 years and LDL-C <70 mg/dL was set as the reference. In each age group, LDL-C <70 mg/dL was used as a reference for the subgroup analysis.
Results
The cut-off LDL-C value for increased MI risk in each age group varied (<40 years old, LDL-C ≥160 mg/dL: hazard ratios [HR], 2.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.644 to 2.506) (40–49-year-old, LDL-C <115 mg/dL: HR, 1.245; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.489) (50–59-year-old, LDL-C <115 mg/dL: HR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.014 to 1.445) (60-69-year-old, LDL-C <145 mg/dL: HR, 1.229; 95% CI, 1.022 to 1.479) (≥70 years old group, LDL-C <100 mg/dL: HR, 1.238; 95% CI, 1.018 to 1.504). The cut-off LDL-C values for increased stroke risk varied in each age subgroup (<40 years old, LDL-C ≥160 mg/dL: HR, 1.395; 95% CI, 1.094 to 1.779) (40–49-year-old, LDL-C <145 mg/dL: HR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.019 to 1.253) (50–59-year-old, LDL-C <160 mg/dL: HR, 1.079; 95% CI, 1.008 to 1.154) (60–69-year-old, LDL-C <130 mg/dL: HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.022 to 1.119) (≥70 years old, LDL-C <115 mg/dL: HR, 1.064; 95% CI, 1.019 to 1.112).
Conclusion
The effect of LDL-C on the risk of CVD differs depending on the age of the population with DM.
Metabolic Risk/Epidemiology
A Composite Blood Biomarker Including AKR1B10 and Cytokeratin 18 for Progressive Types of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Seung Joon Choi, Sungjin Yoon, Kyoung-Kon Kim, Doojin Kim, Hye Eun Lee, Kwang Gi Kim, Seung Kak Shin, Ie Byung Park, Seong Min Kim, Dae Ho Lee
Received June 18, 2023  Accepted August 16, 2023  Published online February 1, 2024  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2023.0189    [Epub ahead of print]
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
We aimed to evaluate whether composite blood biomarkers including aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10 (AKR1B10) and cytokeratin 18 (CK-18; a nonalcoholic steatohepatitis [NASH] marker) have clinically applicable performance for the diagnosis of NASH, advanced liver fibrosis, and high-risk NASH (NASH+significant fibrosis).
Methods
A total of 116 subjects including healthy control subjects and patients with biopsy-proven nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) were analyzed to assess composite blood-based and imaging-based biomarkers either singly or in combination.
Results
A composite blood biomarker comprised of AKR1B10, CK-18, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) showed excellent performance for the diagnosis of, NASH, advanced fibrosis, and high-risk NASH, with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve values of 0.934 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.888 to 0.981), 0.902 (95% CI, 0.832 to 0.971), and 0.918 (95% CI, 0.862 to 0.974), respectively. However, the performance of this blood composite biomarker was inferior to that various magnetic resonance (MR)-based composite biomarkers, such as proton density fat fraction/MR elastography- liver stiffness measurement (MRE-LSM)/ALT/AST for NASH, MRE-LSM+fibrosis-4 index for advanced fibrosis, and the known MR imaging-AST (MAST) score for high-risk NASH.
Conclusion
Our blood composite biomarker can be useful to distinguish progressive forms of NAFLD as an initial noninvasive test when MR-based tools are not available.
Review
Lifestyle
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Sarcopenia as Comorbid Chronic Diseases in Older Adults: Established and Emerging Treatments and Therapies
Jakub Mesinovic, Jackson J. Fyfe, Jason Talevski, Michael J. Wheeler, Gloria K.W. Leung, Elena S. George, Melkamu T. Hunegnaw, Costas Glavas, Paul Jansons, Robin M. Daly, David Scott
Diabetes Metab J. 2023;47(6):719-742.   Published online September 14, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2023.0112
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  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and sarcopenia (low skeletal muscle mass and function) share a bidirectional relationship. The prevalence of these diseases increases with age and they share common risk factors. Skeletal muscle fat infiltration, commonly referred to as myosteatosis, may be a major contributor to both T2DM and sarcopenia in older adults via independent effects on insulin resistance and muscle health. Many strategies to manage T2DM result in energy restriction and subsequent weight loss, and this can lead to significant declines in muscle mass in the absence of resistance exercise, which is also a first-line treatment for sarcopenia. In this review, we highlight recent evidence on established treatments and emerging therapies targeting weight loss and muscle mass and function improvements in older adults with, or at risk of, T2DM and/or sarcopenia. This includes dietary, physical activity and exercise interventions, new generation incretin-based agonists and myostatin-based antagonists, and endoscopic bariatric therapies. We also highlight how digital health technologies and health literacy interventions can increase uptake of, and adherence to, established and emerging treatments and therapies in older adults with T2DM and/or sarcopenia.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Fucoidan ameliorates diabetic skeletal muscle atrophy through PI3K/Akt pathway
    Caixia Li, Yaping Liu, Mingzhi Yang, Haoyue Huang, Lulu Tang, Yufan Miao, Wenjie Li, Xing Li
    Journal of Functional Foods.2024; 114: 106076.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Metabolic Risk/Epidemiology
Prediabetes Progression and Regression on Objectively- Measured Physical Function: A Prospective Cohort Study
Shanhu Qiu, Yiming Zhu, Bo Xie, Wenji Chen, Duolao Wang, Xue Cai, Zilin Sun, Tongzhi Wu
Diabetes Metab J. 2023;47(6):859-868.   Published online August 23, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2022.0377
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Prediabetes leads to declines in physical function in older adults, but the impact of prediabetes progression or regression on physical function is unknown. This study assessed this longitudinal association, with physical function objectivelymeasured by grip strength, walking speed, and standing balance, based on the Health and Retirement Study enrolling United States adults aged >50 years.
Methods
Participants with prediabetes were followed-up for 4-year to ascertain prediabetes status alteration (maintained, regressed, or progressed), and another 4-year to assess their impacts on physical function. Weak grip strength was defined as <26 kg for men and <16 kg for women, slow walking speed was as <0.8 m/sec, and poor standing balance was as an uncompleted fulltandem standing testing. Logistic and linear regression analyses were performed.
Results
Of the included 1,511 participants with prediabetes, 700 maintained as prediabetes, 306 progressed to diabetes, and 505 regressed to normoglycemia over 4 years. Grip strength and walking speed were declined from baseline during the 4-year followup, regardless of prediabetes status alteration. Compared with prediabetes maintenance, prediabetes progression increased the odds of developing weak grip strength by 89% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.04 to 2.44) and exhibited larger declines in grip strength by 0.85 kg (95% CI, –1.65 to –0.04). However, prediabetes progression was not related to impairments in walking speed or standing balance. Prediabetes regression also did not affect any measures of physical function.
Conclusion
Prediabetes progression accelerates grip strength decline in aging population, while prediabetes regression may not prevent physical function decline due to aging.
Metabolic Risk/Epidemiology
Differential Impact of Obesity on the Risk of Diabetes Development in Two Age Groups: Analysis from the National Health Screening Program
Tae Kyung Yoo, Kyung-Do Han, Yang-Hyun Kim, Ga Eun Nam, Sang Hyun Park, Eun-Jung Rhee, Won-Young Lee
Diabetes Metab J. 2023;47(6):846-858.   Published online August 23, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2022.0242
  • 1,164 View
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
The effect of obesity on the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in different age groups remains unclear. We assessed the impact of obesity on the development of DM for two age groups (40-year-old, middle age; 66-year-old, older adults) in the Korean population.
Methods
We analyzed Korean National Health Insurance Service data of 4,145,321 Korean adults with 40- and 66-year-old age without DM, between 2009 and 2014. Participants were followed up until 2017 or until the diagnosis of DM. We assessed the risk of DM based on the body mass index and waist circumference of the participants. Multiple confounding factors were adjusted.
Results
The median follow-up duration was 5.6 years. The association of general and abdominal obesity with the risk of DM development was stronger in the 40-year-old group (general obesity: hazard ratio [HR], 3.566, 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.512 to 3.622; abdominal obesity: HR, 3.231; 95% CI, 3.184 to 3.278) than in the 66-year-old group (general obesity: HR, 1.739; 95% CI, 1.719 to 1.759; abdominal obesity: HR, 1.799; 95% CI, 1.778 to 1.820). In the 66-year-old group, abdominal obesity had a stronger association with the development of DM as compared to general obesity. In the 40-year-old group, general obesity had a stronger association with the risk of DM development than abdominal obesity.
Conclusion
The influence of general and abdominal obesity on the development of DM differed according to age. In older adults, abdominal obesity had a stronger association with DM development than general obesity.
Reviews
Basic Research
Regulation of Cellular Senescence in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: From Mechanisms to Clinical Applications
Kanako Iwasaki, Cristian Abarca, Cristina Aguayo-Mazzucato
Diabetes Metab J. 2023;47(4):441-453.   Published online March 6, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2022.0416
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  • 3 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Cellular senescence is accelerated by hyperglycemia through multiple pathways. Therefore, senescence is an important cellular mechanism to consider in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and an additional therapeutic target. The use of drugs that remove senescent cells has led to improvements in blood glucose levels and diabetic complications in animal studies. Although the removal of senescent cells is a promising approach for the treatment of T2DM, two main challenges limit its clinical application: the molecular basis of cellular senescence in each organ is yet to be understood, and the specific effect of removing senescent cells in each organ has to be determined. This review aims to discuss future applications of targeting senescence as a therapeutic option in T2DM and elucidate the characteristics of cellular senescence and senescence-associated secretory phenotype in the tissues important for regulating glucose levels: pancreas, liver, adipocytes, and skeletal muscle.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Amide Alkaloids as Privileged Sources of Senomodulators for Therapeutic Purposes in Age-Related Diseases
    Mazzarine Dotou, Aurore L’honoré, Roba Moumné, Chahrazade El Amri
    Journal of Natural Products.2024; 87(3): 617.     CrossRef
  • Study on the Pathogenesis of Cell Senescence in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver
    丽媛 黄
    Medical Diagnosis.2024; 14(01): 76.     CrossRef
  • Senescent adipocytes and type 2 diabetes – current knowledge and perspective concepts
    Weronika Kruczkowska, Julia Gałęziewska, Mateusz Kciuk, Adrianna Gielecińska, Elżbieta Płuciennik, Zbigniew Pasieka, Lin-Yong Zhao, Yi-Jin Yu, Damian Kołat, Żaneta Kałuzińska-Kołat
    Biomolecular Concepts.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Long-Term Passage on Porcine SMCs’ Function and the Improvement of TGF-β1 on Porcine SMCs’ Secretory Function in Late Passage
    Yan-Yan Zheng, Ze-Nan Hu, Zheng Liu, Yi-Chen Jiang, Ren-Peng Guo, Shi-Jie Ding, Guang-Hong Zhou
    Foods.2023; 12(14): 2682.     CrossRef
  • Exploring the Relationship between Cellular Senescence Markers and Aging-Related Diseases
    怡 罗
    Advances in Clinical Medicine.2023; 13(08): 12298.     CrossRef
Basic Research
Mitochondrial-Encoded Peptide MOTS-c, Diabetes, and Aging-Related Diseases
Byung Soo Kong, Changhan Lee, Young Min Cho
Diabetes Metab J. 2023;47(3):315-324.   Published online February 24, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2022.0333
  • 5,626 View
  • 284 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Mitochondria are complex metabolic organelles with manifold pathophysiological implications in diabetes. Currently published mitochondrial-encoded peptides, which are expressed from the mitochondrial open reading frame of the 12S ribosomal RNA type-c (MOTS-c), 16S rRNA (humanin and short humanin like peptide 1-6 [SHLP1-6]), or small human mitochondrial open reading frame over serine tRNA (SHMOOSE) are associated with regulation of cellular metabolism and insulin action in age-related diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review focuses mainly on recent advances in MOTS-c research with regards to diabetes, including both type 1 and type 2. The emerging understanding of MOTS-c in diabetes may provide insight into the development of new therapies for diabetes and other age or senescence-related diseases.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Mitochondrial-derived peptides: Antidiabetic functions and evolutionary perspectives
    Satadeepa Kal, Sumana Mahata, Suborno Jati, Sushil K. Mahata
    Peptides.2024; 172: 171147.     CrossRef
  • Mitochondrial Stress and Mitokines: Therapeutic Perspectives for the Treatment of Metabolic Diseases
    Benyuan Zhang, Joon Young Chang, Min Hee Lee, Sang-Hyeon Ju, Hyon-Seung Yi, Minho Shong
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2024; 48(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Mitochondrial bioenergetics, metabolism, and beyond in pancreatic β-cells and diabetes
    Alejandra María Rivera Nieves, Brian Michael Wauford, Accalia Fu
    Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Articles
Complication
Association between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Brain Atrophy: A Meta-Analysis
Tianqi Zhang, Marnie Shaw, Nicolas Cherbuin
Diabetes Metab J. 2022;46(5):781-802.   Published online March 8, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2021.0189
  • 6,375 View
  • 296 Download
  • 11 Web of Science
  • 20 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is known to be associated with cognitive decline and brain structural changes. This study systematically reviews and estimates human brain volumetric differences and atrophy associated with T2DM.
Methods
PubMed, PsycInfo and Cochrane Library were searched for brain imaging studies reporting on brain volume differences between individuals with T2DM and healthy controls. Data were examined using meta-analysis, and association between age, sex, diabetes characteristics and brain volumes were tested using meta-regression.
Results
A total of 14,605 entries were identified; after title, abstract and full-text screening applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, 64 studies were included and 42 studies with compatible data contributed to the meta-analysis (n=31,630; mean age 71.0 years; 44.4% male; 26,942 control; 4,688 diabetes). Individuals with T2DM had significantly smaller total brain volume, total grey matter volume, total white matter volume and hippocampal volume (approximately 1% to 4%); meta-analyses of smaller samples focusing on other brain regions and brain atrophy rate in longitudinal investigations also indicated smaller brain volumes and greater brain atrophy associated with T2DM. Meta-regression suggests that diabetes-related brain volume differences start occurring in early adulthood, decreases with age and increases with diabetes duration.
Conclusion
T2DM is associated with smaller total and regional brain volume and greater atrophy over time. These effects are substantial and highlight an urgent need to develop interventions to reduce the risk of T2DM for brain health.

Citations

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  • Diabetes, antidiabetic medications and risk of dementia: A systematic umbrella review and meta‐analysis
    Alvin Kuate Defo, Veselko Bakula, Alessandro Pisaturo, Christopher Labos, Simon S. Wing, Stella S. Daskalopoulou
    Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.2024; 26(2): 441.     CrossRef
  • Cognitive deficits among people with schizophrenia and prediabetes or diabetes
    Alexander Panickacheril John, Thynn Mya, Darren Haywood
    Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica.2024; 149(1): 65.     CrossRef
  • The association of glucose metabolism measures and diabetes status with Alzheimer’s disease biomarkers of amyloid and tau: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Veerle van Gils, Marianna Rizzo, Jade Côté, Wolfgang Viechtbauer, Giuseppe Fanelli, Jordi Salas-Salvadó, Theresa Wimberley, Mònica Bulló, Fernando Fernandez-Aranda, Søren Dalsgaard, Pieter Jelle Visser, Willemijn J. Jansen, Stephanie J.B. Vos
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  • ECHDC3 Variant Regulates the Right Hippocampal Microstructural Integrity and Verbal Memory in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
    Qiyu Zhao, Xin Du, Feng Liu, Yang Zhang, Wen Qin, Quan Zhang
    Neuroscience.2024; 538: 30.     CrossRef
  • The hemodynamic response function as a type 2 diabetes biomarker: a data-driven approach
    Pedro Guimarães, Pedro Serranho, João V. Duarte, Joana Crisóstomo, Carolina Moreno, Leonor Gomes, Rui Bernardes, Miguel Castelo-Branco
    Frontiers in Neuroinformatics.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Cerebral Circulation - Cognition and Behavior.2024; 6: 100199.     CrossRef
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    European Journal of Epidemiology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics.2023; 29(S1): 59.     CrossRef
  • NHANES 2011–2014 Reveals Decreased Cognitive Performance in U.S. Older Adults with Metabolic Syndrome Combinations
    Edgar Díaz-Camargo, Juan Hernández-Lalinde, María Sánchez-Rubio, Yudy Chaparro-Suárez, Liseth Álvarez-Caicedo, Alexandra Fierro-Zarate, Marbel Gravini-Donado, Henry García-Pacheco, Joselyn Rojas-Quintero, Valmore Bermúdez
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2023; 20(7): 5257.     CrossRef
  • People with Diabetes Have Poorer Self-Rated Health (SRH) and Diabetes Moderates the Association between Age and SRH
    Weixi Kang, Antonio Malvaso
    Diseases.2023; 11(2): 73.     CrossRef
  • Cognitive dysfunction in diabetes: abnormal glucose metabolic regulation in the brain
    Shan Zhang, Yueying Zhang, Zhige Wen, YaNan Yang, Tianjie Bu, Xiangwei Bu, Qing Ni
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  • The psychological basis of hunger and its dysfunctions
    Richard J Stevenson
    Nutrition Reviews.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Associations of Glucose Metabolism Status with Brain Macrostructure and Microstructure: Findings from the UK Biobank
    Ruyi Li, Tingting Geng, Lin Li, Qi Lu, Rui Li, Xue Chen, Yunjing Ou, Sen Liu, Xiaoyu Lin, Qingying Tian, Zixin Qiu, Kai Zhu, Ziyue Tang, Kun Yang, An Pan, Gang Liu
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  • Association Between Frequency of Social Contact and Brain Atrophy in Community-Dwelling Older People Without Dementia
    Naoki Hirabayashi, Takanori Honda, Jun Hata, Yoshihiko Furuta, Mao Shibata, Tomoyuki Ohara, Yasuko Tatewaki, Yasuyuki Taki, Shigeyuki Nakaji, Tetsuya Maeda, Kenjiro Ono, Masaru Mimura, Kenji Nakashima, Jun-ichi Iga, Minoru Takebayashi, Toshiharu Ninomiya,
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    Jose A. Santiago, Mridula Karthikeyan, Madison Lackey, Diana Villavicencio, Judith A. Potashkin
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  • Association between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Brain Atrophy: A Meta-Analysis (Diabetes Metab J 2022;46:781-802)
    Tianqi Zhang, Marnie Shaw, Nicolas Cherbuin
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2022; 46(5): 815.     CrossRef
  • Association between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Brain Atrophy: A Meta-Analysis (Diabetes Metab J 2022;46:781-802)
    Se Hee Min
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2022; 46(5): 813.     CrossRef
  • MORPHOFUNCTIONAL CHANGES OF THE BRAIN IN DIABETES MELLITUS
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Metabolic Risk/Epidemiology
Magnetic Resonance-Based Assessments Better Capture Pathophysiologic Profiles and Progression in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Seung Joon Choi, Seong Min Kim, Yun Soo Kim, Oh Sang Kwon, Seung Kak Shin, Kyoung Kon Kim, Kiyoung Lee, Ie Byung Park, Cheol Soo Choi, Dong Hae Chung, Jaehun Jung, MunYoung Paek, Dae Ho Lee
Diabetes Metab J. 2021;45(5):739-752.   Published online October 28, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2020.0137
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Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Several noninvasive tools are available for the assessment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) including clinical and blood biomarkers, transient elastography (TE), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as proton density fat fraction (MRI-PDFF) and magnetic resonance elastography (MRE). In the present study, we aimed to evaluate whether magnetic resonance (MR)-based examinations better discriminate the pathophysiologic features and fibrosis progression in NAFLD than other noninvasive methods.
Methods
A total of 133 subjects (31 healthy volunteers and 102 patients with NAFLD) were subjected to clinical and noninvasive NAFLD evaluation, with additional liver biopsy in some patients (n=54).
Results
MRI-PDFF correlated far better with hepatic fat measured by MR spectroscopy (r=0.978, P<0.001) than with the TE controlled attenuation parameter (CAP) (r=0.727, P<0.001). In addition, MRI-PDFF showed stronger correlations with various pathophysiologic parameters for cellular injury, glucose and lipid metabolism, and inflammation, than the TE-CAP. The MRI-PDFF and TE-CAP cutoff levels associated with abnormal elevation of serum alanine aminotransferase were 9.9% and 270 dB/m, respectively. The MRE liver stiffness measurement (LSM) showed stronger correlations with liver enzymes, platelets, complement component 3, several clinical fibrosis scores, and the enhanced liver fibrosis (ELF) score than the TE-LSM. In an analysis of only biopsied patients, MRE performed better in discriminating advanced fibrosis with a cutoff value of 3.9 kPa than the TE (cutoff 8.1 kPa) and ELF test (cutoff 9.2 kPa).
Conclusion
Our results suggest that MRI-based assessment of NAFLD is the best non-invasive tool that captures the histologic, pathophysiologic and metabolic features of the disease.

Citations

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  • A Novel Score Based on Controlled Attenuation Parameter Accurately Predicts Hepatic Steatosis in Individuals With Metabolic Dysfunction Associated Steatotic Liver Disease: A Derivation and Independent Validation Study
    Zi-Ming An, Qiao-Hong Liu, Xin-Jian Ye, Qian Zhang, Hua-Fu Pei, Xin Xin, Jie Yuan, Qian Huang, Kun Liu, Fang Lu, Zhi-Han Yan, Yu Zhao, Yi-Yang Hu, Ming-Hua Zheng, Qin Feng
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  • Imaging Methods Applicable in the Diagnostics of Alzheimer’s Disease, Considering the Involvement of Insulin Resistance
    Petra Hnilicova, Ema Kantorova, Stanislav Sutovsky, Milan Grofik, Kamil Zelenak, Egon Kurca, Norbert Zilka, Petra Parvanovova, Martin Kolisek
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2023; 24(4): 3325.     CrossRef
  • Polyunsaturated and Saturated Oxylipin Plasma Levels Allow Monitoring the Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Progression to Severe Stages
    Miguel D. Ferrer, Clara Reynés, Margalida Monserrat-Mesquida, Magdalena Quetglas-Llabrés, Cristina Bouzas, Silvia García, David Mateos, Miguel Casares, Cristina Gómez, Lucía Ugarriza, Josep A. Tur, Antoni Sureda, Antoni Pons
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  • An individual patient data meta-analysis to determine cut-offs for and confounders of NAFLD-fibrosis staging with magnetic resonance elastography
    Jia-xu Liang, Javier Ampuero, Hao Niu, Kento Imajo, Mazen Noureddin, Jaideep Behari, Dae Ho Lee, Richard L. Ehman, Fredrik Rorsman, Johan Vessby, Juan R. Lacalle, Ferenc E. Mózes, Michael Pavlides, Quentin M. Anstee, Stephen A. Harrison, Javier Castell, R
    Journal of Hepatology.2023; 79(3): 592.     CrossRef
  • Relationship between controlled attenuated parameter and magnetic resonance imaging–proton density fat fraction for evaluating hepatic steatosis in patients with NAFLD
    Ziming An, Qiaohong Liu, Wenli Zeng, Yan Wang, Qian Zhang, Huafu Pei, Xin Xin, Shuohui Yang, Fang Lu, Yu Zhao, Yiyang Hu, Qin Feng
    Hepatology Communications.2022; 6(8): 1975.     CrossRef
  • Noninvasive imaging of hepatic dysfunction: A state-of-the-art review
    Ting Duan, Han-Yu Jiang, Wen-Wu Ling, Bin Song
    World Journal of Gastroenterology.2022; 28(16): 1625.     CrossRef
  • Diagnosis and Pathogenesis of Sarcopenia in Chronic Liver Disease Using Liver Magnetic Resonance Imaging
    Atsushi Nakamura, Tsubasa Yoshimura, Tomomi Sato, Takeshi Ichikawa
    Cureus.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Plasma Aldo-Keto Reductase Family 1 Member B10 as a Biomarker Performs Well in the Diagnosis of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis and Fibrosis
    Aron Park, Seung Joon Choi, Sungjin Park, Seong Min Kim, Hye Eun Lee, Minjae Joo, Kyoung Kon Kim, Doojin Kim, Dong Hae Chung, Jae Been Im, Jaehun Jung, Seung Kak Shin, Byung-Chul Oh, Cheolsoo Choi, Seungyoon Nam, Dae Ho Lee
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2022; 23(9): 5035.     CrossRef
  • Contribution of a genetic risk score to ethnic differences in fatty liver disease
    Maddie J. Kubiliun, Jonathan C. Cohen, Helen H. Hobbs, Julia Kozlitina
    Liver International.2022; 42(10): 2227.     CrossRef
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Drug/Regimen
Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonist Differentially Affects Brain Activation in Response to Visual Food Cues in Lean and Obese Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Jae Hyun Bae, Hyung Jin Choi, Kang Ik Kevin Cho, Lee Kyung Kim, Jun Soo Kwon, Young Min Cho
Diabetes Metab J. 2020;44(2):248-259.   Published online November 4, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2019.0018
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   
Background

To investigate the effects of a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist on functional brain activation in lean and obese individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in response to visual food cues.

Methods

In a randomized, single-blinded, crossover study, 15 lean and 14 obese individuals with T2DM were administered lixisenatide or normal saline subcutaneously with a 1-week washout period. We evaluated brain activation in response to pictures of high-calorie food, low-calorie food, and nonfood using functional magnetic resonance imaging and measured appetite and caloric intake in participants who were given access to an ad libitum buffet.

Results

Obese individuals with T2DM showed significantly greater activation of the hypothalamus, pineal gland, parietal cortex (high-calorie food vs. low-calorie food, P<0.05), orbitofrontal cortex (high-calorie food vs. nonfood, P<0.05), and visual cortex (food vs. nonfood, P<0.05) than lean individuals with T2DM. Lixisenatide injection significantly reduced the functional activation of the fusiform gyrus and lateral ventricle in obese individuals with T2DM compared with that in lean individuals with T2DM (nonfood vs. high-calorie food, P<0.05). In addition, in individuals who decreased their caloric intake after lixisenatide injection, there were significant interaction effects between group and treatment in the posterior cingulate, medial frontal cortex (high-calorie food vs. low-calorie food, P<0.05), hypothalamus, orbitofrontal cortex, and temporal lobe (food vs. nonfood, P<0.05).

Conclusion

Brain responses to visual food cues were different in lean and obese individuals with T2DM. In addition, acute administration of lixisenatide differentially affected functional brain activation in these individuals, especially in those who decreased their caloric intake after lixisenatide injection.

Citations

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Clinical Care/Education
Hyperglycemia Is Associated with Impaired Muscle Quality in Older Men with Diabetes: The Korean Longitudinal Study on Health and Aging
Ji Won Yoon, Yong-Chan Ha, Kyoung Min Kim, Jae Hoon Moon, Sung Hee Choi, Soo Lim, Young Joo Park, Jae Young Lim, Ki Woong Kim, Kyong Soo Park, Hak Chul Jang
Diabetes Metab J. 2016;40(2):140-146.   Published online March 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2016.40.2.140
  • 7,252 View
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  • 86 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   
Background

The study aimed to investigate the influence of hyperglycemia on muscle quality in older men with type 2 diabetes.

Methods

This was a subsidiary study of the Korean Longitudinal Study of Health and Aging. Among 326 older men consenting to tests of body composition and muscle strength, 269 men were ultimately analyzed after the exclusion because of stroke (n=30) and uncertainty about the diagnosis of diabetes (n=27). Body composition was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and computed tomography. Muscle strength for knee extension was measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. Muscle quality was assessed from the ratio of leg strength to the entire corresponding leg muscle mass.

Results

The muscle mass, strength, and quality in patients with type 2 diabetes did not differ significantly from controls. However, when patients with diabetes were subdivided according to their glycemic control status, patients with a glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level of ≥8.5% showed significantly decreased leg muscle quality by multivariate analysis (odds ratio, 4.510; P=0.045) after adjustment for age, body mass index, smoking amount, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and duration of diabetes. Physical performance status was also impaired in subjects with an HbA1c of ≥8.5%.

Conclusion

Poor glycemic control in these older patients with diabetes was associated with significant risk of decreased muscle quality and performance status. Glycemic control with an HbA1c of <8.5% might be needed to reduce the risk of adverse skeletal and functional outcomes in this population.

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Review
The Interplay between Autophagy and Aging
Jong-Ok Pyo, Seung-Min Yoo, Yong-Keun Jung
Diabetes Metab J. 2013;37(5):333-339.   Published online October 17, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2013.37.5.333
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   

Numerous studies have established a link between autophagy and aging; however, the relationship has not been clearly defined. Aging is a very complex process caused by the accumulation of various factors due to the gradual failure of cellular maintenance. Recent studies have shown that autophagy reduces the stress responses induced by starvation, reactive oxygen species, and the accumulation of intracellular proteins and organelles through cytoprotection, clearance of damaged mitochondria, and lysosomal degradation. Here, we summarize our current understanding of the relationship between autophagy and the aging process.

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Original Article
Effects of Aging and Obesity on Insulin Secretion and Sensitivity.
J Y Kim, J H Jee, H J Kim, B W Lee, Y J Chung, J H Chung, Y K Min, M S Lee, M K Lee, K W Kim
Korean Diabetes J. 2005;29(1):39-47.   Published online January 1, 2005
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Type 2 diabetes is occurring in epidemic proportions worldwide and aging has been defined as one of the risk factors for the progression to diabetes. The mechanism responsible for deterioration of glucose tolerance with aging is still unclear. It has been debated whether this deterioration results from an abnormal beta cell secretory function or/and decreased insulin sensitivity, from the aging process per se, or some other factors, such as an increase in BMI and abdominal fat. The changes in the insulin secretion and sensitivity were assessed in relation to aging and obesity, and the association between obesity and factors influencing glucose homeostasis in obese subjects evaluated. METHODS: 530 individuals, aged 24 to 75 years, having undergone a 75 g OGTT were enrolled, and the insulinogenic index and HOMA-IR calculated for each subject. 212 individuals were obese, i.e. a BMI above 25, which was evaluated from the body composition by CT at the umbilicus and thigh levels. RESULTS: There was negative correlation between the insulinogenic index and age, but not between HOMA-IR and age. In relation to increasing age, the body composition changed toward a metabolically obese state, with increasing WHR, visceral fat area, VSR and VWR. Both the insulinogenic index and HOMA-IR were positively correlated with the anthropometric parameters. CONCLUSION: The age-associated deterioration in glucose tolerance may be due to decreases in both insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity from changes in body composition

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