Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

Diabetes Metab J : Diabetes & Metabolism Journal

Search
OPEN ACCESS

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
21 "Fasting"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
Original Article
Epidemiology
Predictors of Incident Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Japanese Americans with Normal Fasting Glucose Level
You-Cheol Hwang, Wilfred Y. Fujimoto, Steven E. Kahn, Donna L. Leonetti, Edward J. Boyko
Diabetes Metab J. 2018;42(3):198-206.   Published online April 25, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2017.0100
  • 3,325 View
  • 29 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   
Background

Little is known about the natural course of normal fasting glucose (NFG) in Asians and the risk factors for future diabetes.

Methods

A total of 370 Japanese Americans (163 men, 207 women) with NFG levels and no history of diabetes, aged 34 to 75 years, were enrolled. Oral glucose tolerance tests were performed at baseline, 2.5, 5, and 10 years after enrollment.

Results

During 10 years of follow-up, 16.1% of participants met criteria for diabetes diagnosis, and 39.6% of subjects still had NFG levels at the time of diabetes diagnosis. During 5 years of follow-up, age (odds ratio [OR], 1.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01 to 1.10; P=0.026) and family history of diabetes (OR, 3.24; 95% CI, 1.42 to 7.40; P=0.005) were independently associated with future diabetes diagnosis; however, fasting glucose level was not an independent predictor. During 10 years of follow-up, family history of diabetes (OR, 2.76; 95% CI, 1.37 to 5.54; P=0.004), fasting insulin level (OR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.02; P=0.037), and fasting glucose level (OR, 3.69; 95% CI, 1.13 to 12.01; P=0.030) were associated with diabetes diagnosis independent of conventional risk factors for diabetes.

Conclusion

A substantial number of subjects with NFG at baseline still remained in the NFG range at the time of diabetes diagnosis. A family history of diabetes and fasting insulin and glucose levels were associated with diabetes diagnosis during 10 years of follow-up; however, fasting glucose level was not associated with diabetes risk within the relatively short-term follow-up period of 5 years in subjects with NFG.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • J-shape relationship between normal fasting plasma glucose and risk of type 2 diabetes in the general population: results from two cohort studies
    Linfeng He, Wenbin Zheng, Zeyu Li, Lu Chen, Wen Kong, Tianshu Zeng
    Journal of Translational Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Fasting plasma glucose and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in a group of Chinese people with normoglycemia and without obesity
    Ziqiong Wang, Zheng Liu, Sen He
    Journal of Diabetes.2021; 13(7): 601.     CrossRef
  • Hidden Risks behind Normal Fasting Glucose: Is It Significant?
    Seung-Hwan Lee
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2018; 42(3): 196.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Epidemiology
Relationship between Biological Markers, Metabolic Components, Lifestyles, and Impaired Fasting Glucose in Male Workers
Tomoyuki Kawada
Diabetes Metab J. 2015;39(5):434-438.   Published online October 22, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2015.39.5.434
  • 2,881 View
  • 26 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   
Background

Confirmation regarding the association between impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and biomarkers in addition to metabolic components and lifestyle factors are required in the occupational filed for preventing diabetes mellitus.

Methods

The study was performed in working men aged 30 to 60 years old, who were not taking medication for any metabolic diseases. The author measured the serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), uric acid, and plasma fibrinogen as potential biomarkers of IFG.

Results

The mean serum uric acid, log-transformed serum CRP, and plasma fibrinogen levels were higher in the subjects with IFG than in those without IFG. Multivariate analysis revealed significant associations between the presence of IFG and age, log-transformed value of serum CRP, increased waist circumference, hypertension, and hypertriglyceridemia, with odds ratios of 1.1 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08 to 1.1; P<0.001), 1.8 (95% CI, 1.4 to 2.3; P<0.001), 1.3 (95% CI, 1.09 to 1.7; P<0.01), 1.9 (95% CI, 1.6 to 2.3; P<0.001), and 1.3 (95% CI, 1.04 to 1.6; P<0.05), respectively, for the presence of IFG.

Conclusion

Serum CRP, age, and three metabolic components were associated with IFG. In contrast, there were no significant associations between IFG and lifestyle factors, serum uric acid or plasma fibrinogen.

Original Articles
Serum Adiponectin and Type 2 Diabetes: A 6-Year Follow-Up Cohort Study
Sun Ha Jee, Chul Woo Ahn, Jong Suk Park, Chang Gyu Park, Hyon-Suk Kim, Sang-Hak Lee, Sungha Park, Myoungsook Lee, Chang Beom Lee, Hye Soon Park, Heejin Kimm, Sung Hee Choi, Jidong Sung, Seungjoon Oh, Hyojee Joung, Sung Rae Kim, Ho-Joong Youn, Sun Mi Kim, Hong Soo Lee, Yejin Mok, Eunmi Choi, Young Duk Yun, Soo-Jin Baek, Jaeseong Jo, Kap Bum Huh
Diabetes Metab J. 2013;37(4):252-261.   Published online August 14, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2013.37.4.252
  • 5,216 View
  • 40 Download
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   
Background

Studies on factors which may predict the risk of diabetes are scarce. This prospective cohort study was conducted to determine the association between adiponectin and type 2 diabetes among Korean men and women.

Methods

A total of 42,845 participants who visited one of seven health examination centers located in Seoul and Gyeonggi province, Republic of Korea between 2004 and 2008 were included in this study. The incidence rates of diabetes were determined through December 2011. To evaluate the effects of adiponectin on type 2 diabetes, the Cox proportional hazard model was used.

Results

Of the 40,005 participants, 959 developed type 2 diabetes during a 6-year follow-up. After the adjustment for age, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference, the risks for type 2 diabetes in participants with normoglycemia had a 1.70-fold (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21 to 2.38) increase in men and a 1.83-fold (95% CI, 1.17 to 2.86) increase in women with the lowest tertile of adiponectin when compared to the highest tertile of adiponectin. For participants with impaired fasting glucose (IFG), the risk for type 2 diabetes had a 1.46-fold (95% CI, 1.17 to 1.83) increase in men and a 2.52-fold (95% CI, 1.57 to 4.06) increase in women with the lowest tertile of adiponectin. Except for female participants with normoglycemia, all the risks remained significant after the adjustment for fasting glucose and other confounding variables. Surprisingly, BMI and waist circumference were not predictors of type 2 diabetes in men or women with IFG after adjustment for fasting glucose and other confounders.

Conclusion

A strong association between adiponectin and diabetes was observed. The use of adiponectin as a predictor of type 2 diabetes is considered to be useful.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Adiponectin and metabolic cardiovascular diseases: Therapeutic opportunities and challenges
    Xiaotian Lei, Sheng Qiu, Gangyi Yang, Qinan Wu
    Genes & Diseases.2023; 10(4): 1525.     CrossRef
  • Low levels of total and high-molecular-weight adiponectin may predict non-alcoholic fatty liver in Korean adults
    Young-Sang Kim, Soo-Hyun Lee, Seung Geon Park, Bo Youn Won, Hyejin Chun, Doo-Yeoun Cho, Moon-Jong Kim, Ji Eun Lee, Ji-Hee Haam, Kunhee Han
    Metabolism.2020; 103: 154026.     CrossRef
  • Anti-inflammatory effects of sucrose-derived oligosaccharides produced by a constitutive mutant L. mesenteroides B-512FMCM dextransucrase in high fat diet-fed mice
    Min-Gyung Kang, Hee Jae Lee, Jae-Young Cho, Kanghwa Kim, Soo Jin Yang, Doman Kim
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications.2016; 477(3): 350.     CrossRef
  • Adiponectin as a Protective Factor Against the Progression Toward Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Postmenopausal Women
    Hossein Darabi, Alireza Raeisi, Mohammad Reza Kalantarhormozi, Afshin Ostovar, Majid Assadi, Kamyar Asadipooya, Katayoun Vahdat, Sina Dobaradaran, Iraj Nabipour
    Medicine.2015; 94(33): e1347.     CrossRef
  • Effect of ketotifen in obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus
    Sahar M. El-Haggar, Wael F. Farrag, Fedaa A. Kotkata
    Journal of Diabetes and its Complications.2015; 29(3): 427.     CrossRef
  • Smoking and Diabetes: Is the Association Mediated by Adiponectin, Leptin, or C-reactive Protein?
    Esayas Haregot Hilawe, Hiroshi Yatsuya, Yuanying Li, Mayu Uemura, Chaochen Wang, Chifa Chiang, Hideaki Toyoshima, Koji Tamakoshi, Yan Zhang, Nobuo Kawazoe, Atsuko Aoyama
    Journal of Epidemiology.2015; 25(2): 99.     CrossRef
  • Association between the level of circulating adiponectin and prediabetes: A meta‐analysis
    Huasheng Lai, Nie Lin, Zhenzhen Xing, Huanhuan Weng, Hua Zhang
    Journal of Diabetes Investigation.2015; 6(4): 416.     CrossRef
  • Adiponectin as a Biomarker of Osteoporosis in Postmenopausal Women: Controversies
    Anna Lubkowska, Aleksandra Dobek, Jan Mieszkowski, Wojciech Garczynski, Dariusz Chlubek
    Disease Markers.2014; 2014: 1.     CrossRef
  • Modulation of adiponectin as a potential therapeutic strategy
    Soo Lim, Michael J. Quon, Kwang Kon Koh
    Atherosclerosis.2014; 233(2): 721.     CrossRef
Increasing Prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes in a Rural Bangladeshi Population: A Population Based Study for 10 Years
Bishwajit Bhowmik, Faria Afsana, Lien My Diep, Sanjida Binte Munir, Erica Wright, Sharif Mahmood, A. K. Azad Khan, Akhtar Hussain
Diabetes Metab J. 2013;37(1):46-53.   Published online February 15, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2013.37.1.46
  • 4,956 View
  • 39 Download
  • 27 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   
Background

To observe changes in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and its associated risk factors in a rural Bangladeshi population over a 10-year period.

Methods

Three cross-sectional studies were undertaken in a rural community (aged ≥20 years) in 1999, 2004, and 2009. Structured questionnaires including sociodemographic parameters, anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, and blood glucose values were recorded. DM and IFG were diagnosed using 1999 World Health Organization criteria.

Results

Age standardized prevalence of DM increased significantly (P<0.001) from 1999 to 2009 (2.3%, 6.8%, and 7.9% in 1999, 2004, and 2009, respectively). The prevalence of IFG increased significantly (P=0.011) from 4.6% to 5.8% between 1999 and 2004 but then decreased from 5.8% to 5.3% during 2004 to 2009. Significant linear trends were shown in both sexes for general and central obesity as indicated by body mass index, waist circumference, and waist hip ratio (WHR). Increasing age and systolic blood pressure were significant risk factors for DM in all three studies. WHR for males was also significantly associated with the risk of DM in all three studies. WHR for females was only significantly associated with DM in 2009.

Conclusion

A significant rise in the prevalence of DM was observed in this population over 10 years. This increase was seen in both sexes, and in all age groups. A significant increase in the prevalence of the associated risk factors of general and central obesity was observed in both sexes.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Depression and health-related quality of life of patients with type 2 diabetes attending tertiary level hospitals in Dhaka, Bangladesh
    Manish K. Namdeo, Sarita Verma, Rajat Das Gupta, Rubana Islam, Shaila Nazneen, Lal B. Rawal
    Global Health Research and Policy.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A quantile regression approach to identify risk factors for high blood glucose levels among Bangladeshi individuals
    Mst. Farjana Aktar, Mashfiqul Huq Chowdhury, Md. Siddikur Rahman
    Health Science Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of anthropometric indices with cardiometabolic risk factors in adult Bangladeshi population
    Farah-Sul Lail, Shamima Afrin, Md Mozammel Haque
    Obesity Medicine.2022; 34: 100444.     CrossRef
  • Diabetes among adults in Bangladesh: changes in prevalence and risk factors between two cross-sectional surveys
    Muhammad Abdul Baker Chowdhury, Mirajul Islam, Jakia Rahman, Md Jamal Uddin, Md. Rabiul Haque
    BMJ Open.2022; 12(8): e055044.     CrossRef
  • Community groups or mobile phone messaging to prevent and control type 2 diabetes and intermediate hyperglycaemia in Bangladesh (DMagic): a cluster-randomised controlled trial
    Edward Fottrell, Naveed Ahmed, Joanna Morrison, Abdul Kuddus, Sanjit Kumer Shaha, Carina King, Hannah Jennings, Kohenour Akter, Tasmin Nahar, Hassan Haghparast-Bidgoli, A K Azad Khan, Anthony Costello, Kishwar Azad
    The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.2019; 7(3): 200.     CrossRef
  • Inequalities in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and its risk factors in Sri Lanka: a lower middle income country
    Ambepitiyawaduge Pubudu De Silva, Sudirikku Hennadige Padmal De Silva, Rashan Haniffa, Isurujith Kongala Liyanage, Saroj Jayasinghe, Prasad Katulanda, Chandrika Neelakanthi Wijeratne, Sumedha Wijeratne, Lalini Chandika Rajapaksa
    International Journal for Equity in Health.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Awareness, prevalence, treatment, and control of type 2 diabetes in a semi-urban area of Nepal: Findings from a cross-sectional study conducted as a part of COBIN-D trial
    Bishal Gyawali, Martin Rune Hassan Hansen, Mia Buhl Povlsen, Dinesh Neupane, Peter Krogh Andersen, Craig Steven McLachlan, Annelli Sandbæk, Abhinav Vaidya, Per Kallestrup, Andrew Soundy
    PLOS ONE.2018; 13(11): e0206491.     CrossRef
  • Distribution of diabetes, hypertension and non-communicable disease risk factors among adults in rural Bangladesh: a cross-sectional survey
    Edward Fottrell, Naveed Ahmed, Sanjit Kumer Shaha, Hannah Jennings, Abdul Kuddus, Joanna Morrison, Kohenour Akter, Badrun Nahar, Tasmin Nahar, Hassan Haghparast-Bidgoli, A K Azad Khan, Anthony Costello, Kishwar Azad
    BMJ Global Health.2018; 3(6): e000787.     CrossRef
  • Serum Homocysteine and Its Association with Lipid Profile in Type II Diabetes Mellitus
    Bushra Fiza, Jaishree Choudhary, Maheep Sinha, Rati Mathur
    Indian journal of Medical Biochemistry.2018; 22(1): 26.     CrossRef
  • A Culturally Tailored Community Health Worker Intervention Leads to Improvement in Patient-Centered Outcomes for Immigrant Patients With Type 2 Diabetes
    Nadia S. Islam, Laura C. Wyatt, M.D. Taher, Lindsey Riley, S. Darius Tandon, Michael Tanner, B. Runi Mukherji, Chau Trinh-Shevrin
    Clinical Diabetes.2018; 36(2): 100.     CrossRef
  • Diabetes risk score for identifying cardiometabolic risk factors in adult Bangladeshi population
    Bishwajit Bhowmik, Tasnima Siddiquee, Anindita Mujumder, Tofail Ahmed, Hajera Mahtab, AbulKalam Azad Khan, Akhtar Hussain, Gerd Holmboe-Ottesen, ToneKristin Omsland
    Journal of Diabetology.2018; 9(3): 95.     CrossRef
  • Prediabetes, diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes, their risk factors and association with knowledge of diabetes in rural Bangladesh: The Bangladesh Population‐based Diabetes and Eye Study
    Fakir M. Amirul Islam, Rahul Chakrabarti, M. Tauhidul Islam, Mohammad Wahab, Ecosse Lamoureux, Robert P. Finger, Jonathan E. Shaw
    Journal of Diabetes.2016; 8(2): 260.     CrossRef
  • The effect of community groups and mobile phone messages on the prevention and control of diabetes in rural Bangladesh: study protocol for a three-arm cluster randomised controlled trial
    Edward Fottrell, Hannah Jennings, Abdul Kuddus, Naveed Ahmed, Joanna Morrison, Kohenour Akter, Sanjit Kumar Shaha, Badrun Nahar, Tasmin Nahar, Hassan Haghparast-Bidgoli, A. K. Azad Khan, Anthony Costello, Kishwar Azad
    Trials.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Blood glucose and cholesterol levels in adult population of Bangladesh: Results from STEPS 2006 survey
    M. Mostafa Zaman, Sohel Reza Choudhury, Jasimuddin Ahmed, Md. Habibullah Talukder, A.H.M. Shafiqur Rahman
    Indian Heart Journal.2016; 68(1): 52.     CrossRef
  • A survey on socioeconomic determinants of diabetes mellitus management in a lower middle income setting
    Ambepitiyawaduge Pubudu De Silva, Sudirikku Hennadige Padmal De Silva, Rashan Haniffa, Isurujith Kongala Liyanage, Kosala Saroj Amarasiri Jayasinghe, Prasad Katulanda, Chandrika Neelakanthi Wijeratne, Sumedha Wijeratne, Lalini Chandika Rajapakse
    International Journal for Equity in Health.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Factors that could explain the increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes among adults in a Canadian province: a critical review and analysis
    Véronique Thibault, Mathieu Bélanger, Emilie LeBlanc, Lise Babin, Stuart Halpine, Beverly Greene, Michelina Mancuso
    Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated with Awareness, Attitudes and Practices Regarding Common Eye Diseases in the General Population in a Rural District in Bangladesh: The Bangladesh Population-based Diabetes and Eye Study (BPDES)
    Fakir M. Amirul Islam, Rahul Chakrabarti, Silvia Z. Islam, Robert P. Finger, Christine Critchley, Rohit C. Khanna
    PLOS ONE.2015; 10(7): e0133043.     CrossRef
  • Obesity and associated type 2 diabetes and hypertension in factory workers of Bangladesh
    Bishwajit Bhowmik, Faria Afsana, Tareen Ahmed, Sadeka Akhter, Hasan Ali Choudhury, Anisur Rahman, Tofail Ahmed, Hajera Mahtab, A. K. Azad Khan
    BMC Research Notes.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Type 2 diabetes and its correlates among adults in Bangladesh: a population based study
    Muhammad Abdul Baker Chowdhury, Md Jamal Uddin, Hafiz M. R. Khan, Md Rabiul Haque
    BMC Public Health.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Societal Costs of Diabetes Mellitus 2025 and 2040—Forecasts Based on Real World Cost Evidence and Observed Epidemiological Trends in Denmark
    Camilla Sortsø, Martha Emneus, Anders Green, Peter Bjødstrup Jensen, Thomas Eriksson
    Modern Economy.2015; 06(10): 1150.     CrossRef
  • Simple risk score to detect rural Asian Indian (Bangladeshi) adults at high risk for type 2 diabetes
    Bishwajit Bhowmik, Afroza Akhter, Liaquat Ali, Tofail Ahmed, Faruque Pathan, Hajera Mahtab, Abul Kalam Azad Khan, Akhtar Hussain
    Journal of Diabetes Investigation.2015; 6(6): 670.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes and their risk factors among Bangladeshi adults: a nationwide survey
    Shamima Akter, M Mizanur Rahman, Sarah Krull Abe, Papia Sultana
    Bulletin of the World Health Organization.2014; 92(3): 204.     CrossRef
  • Development of Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis in Bangladesh: A Case-Control Study on Risk Factors
    Mahfuza Rifat, Abul Hasnat Milton, John Hall, Christopher Oldmeadow, Md. Akramul Islam, Ashaque Husain, Md. Wahiduzzaman Akhanda, Bodrun Naher Siddiquea, Ulrike Gertrud Munderloh
    PLoS ONE.2014; 9(8): e105214.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice of Diabetes in Rural Bangladesh: The Bangladesh Population Based Diabetes and Eye Study (BPDES)
    Fakir M. Amirul Islam, Rahul Chakrabarti, Mohamed Dirani, M. Tauhidul Islam, Gail Ormsby, Mohamed Wahab, Christine Critchley, Robert P. Finger, Utpal Sen
    PLoS ONE.2014; 9(10): e110368.     CrossRef
  • Protocol for the DREAM Project (Diabetes Research, Education, and Action for Minorities): a randomized trial of a community health worker intervention to improve diabetic management and control among Bangladeshi adults in NYC
    Nadia Islam, Lindsey Riley, Laura Wyatt, S Darius Tandon, Michael Tanner, Runi Mukherji-Ratnam, Mariano Rey, Chau Trinh-Shevrin
    BMC Public Health.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Differences in pancreatic volume, fat content, and fat density measured by multidetector-row computed tomography according to the duration of diabetes
    Soo Lim, Jae Hyun Bae, Eun Ju Chun, Haeryoung Kim, So Yeon Kim, Kyoung Min Kim, Sung Hee Choi, Kyong Soo Park, Jose C. Florez, Hak Chul Jang
    Acta Diabetologica.2014; 51(5): 739.     CrossRef
  • Letter: Increasing Prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes in a Rural Bangladeshi Population: A Population Based Study for 10 Years (Diabetes Metab J2013;37:46-53)
    Nan Hee Kim
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2013; 37(2): 152.     CrossRef
Impact of HbA1c Criterion on the Detection of Subjects with Increased Risk for Diabetes among Health Check-Up Recipients in Korea
Hong-Kyu Kim, Sung-Jin Bae, Jaeone Choe
Diabetes Metab J. 2012;36(2):151-156.   Published online April 17, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2012.36.2.151
  • 3,266 View
  • 28 Download
  • 17 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   
Background

We performed the study to examine the impact of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) criterion on the screening of increased risk for diabetes among health check-up subjects in Korea.

Methods

We retrospectively analyzed clinical and laboratory data of 37,754 Korean adults (age, 20 to 89 years; 41% women) which were measured during regular health check-ups. After excluding subjects with previously diagnosed diabetes mellitus (n=1,812) and with overt anemia (n=318), 35,624 subjects (21,201 men and 14,423 women) were included in the analysis.

Results

Among the 35,624 subjects, 11,316 (31.8%) subjects were categorized as increased risk for diabetes (IRD) by fasting plasma glucose (FPG) criteria, 6,531 (18.1%) subjects by HbA1c criteria, and 13,556 (38.1%) subjects by combined criteria. Therefore, although HbA1c criteria alone identifies 42% [(11,316-6,531)/11,316] fewer subjects with IRD than does FPG criteria, about 20% [(13,556-11,316)/11,316] more subjects could be detected by including new HbA1c criteria in addition to FPG criteria. Among the 13,556 subjects with IRD, 7,025 (51.8%) met FPG criteria only, 2,240 (16.5%) met HbA1c criteria only, and 4,291 (31.7%) met both criteria. Among subjects with impaired fasting glucose, 65% were normal, 32% were IRD, and 3% were diabetes by HbA1c criterion. In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, cutoff point of HbA1c with optimal sensitivity and specificity for identifying IRD was 5.4%.

Conclusion

Although HbA1c criteria alone identifies fewer subjects with IRD than does FPG criteria, about 20% more could be detected by addition of HbA1c criteria. Further studies are needed to define optimal cutoff point of HbA1c and to establish screening and management guidelines for IRD.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Measuring the Burden of Disease in Korea Using Disability-Adjusted Life Years (2008–2020)
    Yoon-Sun Jung, Young-Eun Kim, Minsu Ock, Seok-Jun Yoon
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Relationship Between HbA1c and 25-hidroxy Vitamin D Levels in Adult Diabetic Patients
    Mehmet ÖZDİN, Durhasan MUNDAN
    Van Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi.2023; 16(1): 25.     CrossRef
  • Does reviewing fasting plasma glucose results patterns before glycosylated hemoglobin testing in type-2 diabetic patients lead to better testing decision?
    Wichaporn Intharachuti, Jiruth Sriratanaban
    Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews.2019; 13(3): 2080.     CrossRef
  • Development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in people with intermediate hyperglycaemia
    Bernd Richter, Bianca Hemmingsen, Maria-Inti Metzendorf, Yemisi Takwoingi
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of different ranges of LH:FSH ratios in polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) – Clinical based case control study
    N.A. Malini, K. Roy George
    General and Comparative Endocrinology.2018; 260: 51.     CrossRef
  • The Cutoff Value of HbA1c in Predicting Diabetes and Impaired Fasting Glucose
    Seyoung Kwon, Youngak Na
    The Korean Journal of Clinical Laboratory Science.2017; 49(2): 114.     CrossRef
  • Risk of progression to diabetes from prediabetes defined by HbA1c or fasting plasma glucose criteria in Koreans
    Chul-Hee Kim, Hong-Kyu Kim, Eun-Hee Kim, Sung-Jin Bae, Jaewon Choe, Joong-Yeol Park
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice.2016; 118: 105.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of the clinical characteristics of diabetes mellitus diagnosed using fasting plasma glucose and haemoglobin A1c: The 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Sangmo Hong, Jun Goo Kang, Chul Sik Kim, Seong Jin Lee, Chang Beom Lee, Sung-Hee Ihm
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice.2016; 113: 23.     CrossRef
  • Association of prediabetes, defined by fasting glucose, HbA1c only, or combined criteria, with the risk of cardiovascular disease in Koreans
    Hong‐Kyu Kim, Jung Bok Lee, Seon Ha Kim, Min‐Woo Jo, Eun Hee Kim, Jenie Yoonoo Hwang, Sung Jin Bae, Chang Hee Jung, Woo Je Lee, Joong‐Yeol Park, Gyung‐Min Park, Young‐Hak Kim, Jaewon Choe
    Journal of Diabetes.2016; 8(5): 657.     CrossRef
  • Fasting plasma glucose concentrations for specified HbA1c goals in Korean populations: data from the Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES V-2, 2011)
    Sangmo Hong, Jun Goo Kang, Chul Sik Kim, Seong Jin Lee, Chang Beom Lee, Sung-Hee Ihm
    Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Impact of hemoglobin A1c‐based criterion on diagnosis of prediabetes: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011
    Chul‐Hee Kim, Hong‐Kyu Kim, Bo‐Yeon Kim, Chan‐Hee Jung, Ji‐Oh Mok, Sung‐Koo Kang
    Journal of Diabetes Investigation.2015; 6(1): 51.     CrossRef
  • Effects of diabetes definition on global surveillance of diabetes prevalence and diagnosis: a pooled analysis of 96 population-based studies with 331 288 participants
    G Danaei, S Fahimi, Y Lu, B Zhou, K Hajifathalian, M Di Cesare, WC Lo, B Reis-Santos, MJ Cowan, JE Shaw, J Bentham, JK Lin, H Bixby, D Magliano, P Bovet, JJ Miranda, YH Khang, GA Stevens, LM Riley, MK Ali, M Ezzati, ZA Abdeen, KA Kadir, M Abu-Rmeileh, B A
    The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.2015; 3(8): 624.     CrossRef
  • Prediabetes is not independently associated with microalbuminuria in Korean general population: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011–2012 (KNHANES V-2,3)
    Chul-Hee Kim, Kyu-Jin Kim, Bo-Yeon Kim, Chan-Hee Jung, Ji-Oh Mok, Sung-Koo Kang, Hong-Kyu Kim
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice.2014; 106(2): e18.     CrossRef
  • Estimation of blood glucose by non-invasive infrared thermography for diagnosis of type 2 diabetes: An alternative for blood sample extraction
    S. Sivanandam, M. Anburajan, B. Venkatraman, M. Menaka, D. Sharath
    Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology.2013; 367(1-2): 57.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of glycated hemoglobin with fasting plasma glucose in definition of glycemic component of the metabolic syndrome in an Iranian population
    Mohsen Janghorbani, Masoud Amini
    Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews.2012; 6(3): 136.     CrossRef
  • Usefulness of Glycated Hemoglobin as Diagnostic Criteria for Metabolic Syndrome
    Sang Hyun Park, Ji Sung Yoon, Kyu Chang Won, Hyoung Woo Lee
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2012; 27(9): 1057.     CrossRef
  • Letter: Impact of HbA1c Criterion on the Detection of Subjects with Increased Risk for Diabetes among Health Check-Up Recipients in Korea (Diabetes Metab J 2012;36:151-6)
    Sung Hee Choi
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2012; 36(3): 251.     CrossRef
Efficacy of Sitagliptin When Added to Ongoing Therapy in Korean Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Hye Soo Chung, Moon-Kyu Lee
Diabetes Metab J. 2011;35(4):411-417.   Published online August 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2011.35.4.411
  • 3,495 View
  • 76 Download
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   
Background

To evaluate the clinical efficacy of sitagliptin for reducing plasma glucose levels in Korean subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus during a 14-week treatment period.

Methods

Our study design involved the addition of 100 mg sitagliptin once-daily to three ongoing combination therapy regimens and changing from glimepiride and metformin to sitagliptin and metformin.

Results

The addition of sitagliptin 100 mg/day produced a statistically significant reduction in mean HbA1c level (mean HbA1c reduction of 0.99±0.85%, P<0.01). In the group taking a combination of sitagliptin and metformin (n=143, initial mean HbA1c level=7.48%), the reductions in HbA1c, 2-hour postprandial glucose, and fasting glucose levels were 0.72±0.76% (P<0.01), 47±65 mg/dL (P<0.01), and 15±44 mg/dL (P<0.01), respectively. In the group taking a combination of sitagliptin, glimepiride, and metformin (n=125, initial mean HbA1c level=8.42%), the reductions in HbA1c, 2-hour postprandial glucose, and fasting glucose levels were 1.09±0.86% (P<0.01), 62±64 mg/dL (P<0.01), and 31±45 mg/dL (P<0.01), respectively. In the group taking a combination of sitagliptin, glimepiride, metformin, and α-glucosidase inhibitor (n=63, initial mean HbA1c level=9.19%), the reductions in HbA1c, 2-hour postprandial glucose, and fasting glucose levels were 1.27±0.70% (P<0.01), 72±65 mg/dL (P<0.01), and 35±51 mg/dL (P<0.01), respectively. In the group that had previous hypoglycemic events and that changed from glimepiride to sitagliptin, HbA1c level did not change but fasting glucose increased significantly (14±29 mg/dL, P<0.01).

Conclusion

Sitagliptin combination therapy for 14 weeks significantly improved glycemic control and was well-tolerated in Korean subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Impact of Treviamet® & Treviamet XR® on quality of life besides glycemic control in type 2 DM patients
    Asima Khan, Muhammad Adnan Kanpurwala, Riasat Ali Khan, Najum F. Mahmudi, Verumal Lohano, Shakeel Ahmed, Majid Khan, Fareed Uddin, Syed Mohammad Ali, Maliha Saghir, Syed Hussain Baqar Abidi, Jahanzeb Kamal
    BMC Endocrine Disorders.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Efficacy and safety of sitagliptin/metformin fixed‐dose combination compared with glimepiride in patients with type 2 diabetes: A multicenter randomized double‐blind study
    Sang Soo Kim, In Joo Kim, Kwang Jae Lee, Jeong Hyun Park, Young Il Kim, Young Sil Lee, Sung Chang Chung, Sang Jin Lee
    Journal of Diabetes.2017; 9(4): 412.     CrossRef
  • Optimal Candidates for the Switch from Glimepiride to Sitagliptin to Reduce Hypoglycemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
    Hyun Min Kim, Jung Soo Lim, Byung-Wan Lee, Eun-Seok Kang, Hyun Chul Lee, Bong-Soo Cha
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2015; 30(1): 84.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness and safety of glimepiride and iDPP4, associated with metformin in second line pharmacotherapy of type 2 diabetes mellitus: systematic review and meta‐analysis
    JM. Amate, T. Lopez‐Cuadrado, N. Almendro, C. Bouza, Z. Saz‐Parkinson, R. Rivas‐Ruiz, J. Gonzalez‐Canudas
    International Journal of Clinical Practice.2015; 69(3): 292.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Characteristics and Metabolic Predictors of Rapid Responders to Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor as an Add-on Therapy to Sulfonylurea and Metformin
    Ye An Kim, Won Sang Yoo, Eun Shil Hong, Eu Jeong Ku, Kyeong Seon Park, Soo Lim, Young Min Cho, Kyong Soo Park, Hak Chul Jang, Sung Hee Choi
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2015; 39(6): 489.     CrossRef
  • Sitagliptin for Elderly Patients Aged 75 Years or Older with Inadequately Controlled Type 2 Diabetes with Common Antidiabetes Treatments
    Katsunori Suzuki, Yurie Mistuma, Takaaki Sato, Mariko Hatta
    International Journal of Clinical Medicine.2015; 06(09): 672.     CrossRef
  • Short‐ and long‐term effect of sitagliptin after near normalization of glycemic control with insulin in poorly controlled Japanese type 2 diabetic patients
    Keiko Fujisawa, Tetsuyuki Yasuda, Hideaki Kaneto, Naoto Katakami, Mayumi Tsuji, Fumiyo Kubo, Shugo Sasaki, Kazuyuki Miyashita, Toyoko Naka, Ryuuichi Kasami, Akio Kuroda, Munehide Matsuhisa, Iichiro Shimomura
    Journal of Diabetes Investigation.2014; 5(5): 548.     CrossRef
  • Efficacy and safety of vildagliptin, Saxagliptin or Sitagliptin as add-on therapy in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with dual combination of traditional oral hypoglycemic agents
    Chun-Jun Li, Xiao-Juan Liu, Lian Bai, Qian Yu, Qiu-Mei Zhang, Pei Yu, De-Min Yu
    Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Tolerability, effectiveness and predictive parameters for the therapeutic usefulness of exenatide in obese, Korean patients with type 2 diabetes
    Sun Ok Song, Kwang Joon Kim, Byung‐Wan Lee, Eun Seok Kang, Bong Soo Cha, Hyun Chul Lee
    Journal of Diabetes Investigation.2014; 5(5): 554.     CrossRef
  • Efficacy of vildagliptin on glucose fluctuation in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients with ongoing sulfonylurea based oral glycemic agent therapy
    Keiji Yoshioka, Haruhiko Isotani, Shin-ichiro Ohashi, Minoru Imamura
    Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews.2013; 7(1): 32.     CrossRef
  • Glimepiride Strongly Enhances the Glucose-Lowering Effect in Triple Oral Antidiabetes Therapy with Sitagliptin and Metformin for Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
    Keiko Arai, Hajime Maeda, Sin-ichiro Sirabe, Ritsuko Yamamoto, Mikio Yamauchi, Tetsuyuki Hirao, Setsuko Hirao, Koichi Hirao
    Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics.2013; 15(4): 335.     CrossRef
  • Efficacy of sitagliptin on blood glucose fluctuation in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients with basal-supported oral therapy
    Mitsuyoshi Takahara, Toshihiko Shiraiwa, Hideaki Kaneto, Naoto Katakami, Taka-aki Matsuoka, Iichiro Shimomura
    Endocrine Journal.2012; 59(12): 1131.     CrossRef
Postprandial Triglyceride Is Associated with Fasting Triglyceride and HOMA-IR in Korean Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes
Seo Hee Lee, Byung-Wan Lee, Hee Kwan Won, Jae Hoon Moon, Kwang Joon Kim, Eun Seok Kang, Bong Soo Cha, Hyun Chul Lee
Diabetes Metab J. 2011;35(4):404-410.   Published online August 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2011.35.4.404
  • 4,211 View
  • 41 Download
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   
Background

Recent studies indicate postprandial triglyceride (TG) had a better association with cardiovascular events and metabolic syndrome than fasting TG. The authors of the present study investigated the metabolic and clinical relevance of postprandial TG.

Methods

In a cross-sectional retrospective study, the authors of the present study compared fasting and postprandial TG and analyzed the relationship between postprandial TG and various demographic and metabolic parameters in 639 Korean subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2D, group I, n=539) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG, group II, n=100) after ingestion of a standardized liquid meal (total 500 kcal, 17.5 g fat, 68.5 g carbohydrate, and 17.5 g protein).

Results

Fasting and postprandial TG were significantly correlated (r=0.973, r=0.937, P<0.001) in group I and II, respectively. Of the variables, total cholesterol, waist circumference and body mass index were significantly correlated with fasting and postprandial TG in both groups. Only postprandial TG showed a significant correlation with glucose metabolic parameters (e.g., postprandial glucose, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR], and fasting C-peptide) in subjects with T2D. Multiple regression analysis showed fasting TG and HOMA-IR could be predictable variables for postprandial TG in subjects with T2D.

Conclusion

Postprandial TG was very strongly correlated with fasting TG. The authors of the present study suggest insulin resistance may be more associated with postprandial TG than fasting TG in Korean T2D patients on a low-fat diet.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Impaired ketogenesis is associated with metabolic-associated fatty liver disease in subjects with type 2 diabetes
    Sejeong Lee, Jaehyun Bae, Doo Ri Jo, Minyoung Lee, Yong-ho Lee, Eun Seok Kang, Bong-Soo Cha, Byung-Wan Lee
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Postprandial lipaemia following consumption of a meal enriched with medium chain saturated and/or long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. A randomised cross-over study
    Grace Austin, Jessica JA. Ferguson, Rohith N. Thota, Harjinder Singh, Tracy Burrows, Manohar L. Garg
    Clinical Nutrition.2021; 40(2): 420.     CrossRef
  • Effects of fatty acids composition in a breakfast meal on the postprandial lipid responses: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials
    Yuanhang Yao, Sheri Xueqi Pek, Darel Wee Kiat Toh, Xuejuan Xia, Jung Eun Kim
    International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition.2020; 71(7): 793.     CrossRef
  • The Forgotten Lipids: Triglycerides, Remnant Cholesterol, and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk
    Pratik B Sandesara, Salim S Virani, Sergio Fazio, Michael D Shapiro
    Endocrine Reviews.2019; 40(2): 537.     CrossRef
  • Determinant of postprandial triglyceride levels in healthy young adults
    Tri J.E. Tarigan, Anandhara I. Khumaedi, Syahidatul Wafa, Michael Johan, Murdani Abdullah, Ingrid S. Surono, Dicky L. Tahapary
    Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews.2019; 13(3): 1917.     CrossRef
  • Impact of the triglyceride level on coronary plaque components in female patients with coronary artery disease treated with statins
    Motoki Yamashita, Atsushi Iwata, Yuta Kato, Makito Futami, Satoshi Imaizumi, Takashi Kuwano, Amane Ike, Makoto Sugihara, Hiroaki Nishikawa, Bo Zhang, Shin’ichiro Yasunaga, Keijiro Saku, Shin-ichiro Miura
    Heart and Vessels.2018; 33(10): 1175.     CrossRef
  • Biomarker potential of C-peptide for screening of insulin resistance in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals
    Haseeb A. Khan, Samia H. Sobki, Aishah Ekhzaimy, Isra Khan, Mona A. Almusawi
    Saudi Journal of Biological Sciences.2018; 25(8): 1729.     CrossRef
  • Postprandial C‐peptide to glucose ratio as a predictor of β‐cell function and its usefulness for staged management of type 2 diabetes
    Eun Young Lee, Sena Hwang, Seo Hee Lee, Yong‐ho Lee, A Ra Choi, Youngki Lee, Byung‐Wan Lee, Eun Seok Kang, Chul Woo Ahn, Bong Soo Cha, Hyun Chul Lee
    Journal of Diabetes Investigation.2014; 5(5): 517.     CrossRef
  • Genetics and Causality of Triglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins in Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease
    Robert S. Rosenson, Michael H. Davidson, Benjamin J. Hirsh, Sekar Kathiresan, Daniel Gaudet
    Journal of the American College of Cardiology.2014; 64(23): 2525.     CrossRef
  • The effect of insulin resistance on postprandial triglycerides in Korean type 2 diabetic patients
    Kyeong Hye Park, Kwang Joon Kim, Byung-Wan Lee, Eun Seok Kang, Bong Soo Cha, Hyun Chul Lee
    Acta Diabetologica.2014; 51(1): 15.     CrossRef
  • Acute effects of an oral supplement of (−)-epicatechin on postprandial fat and carbohydrate metabolism in normal and overweight subjects
    Gabriela Gutiérrez-Salmeán, Pilar Ortiz-Vilchis, Claudia M. Vacaseydel, Ivan Rubio-Gayosso, Eduardo Meaney, Francisco Villarreal, Israel Ramírez-Sánchez, Guillermo Ceballos
    Food & Function.2014; 5(3): 521.     CrossRef
  • A comparative study of broccoli sprouts powder and standard triple therapy on cardiovascular risk factors following H.pylori eradication: a randomized clinical trial in patients with type 2 diabetes
    Parvin Mirmiran, Zahra Bahadoran, Mahdieh Golzarand, Homayoun Zojaji, Fereidoun Azizi
    Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of higher resistin levels with inflammatory activation and endothelial dysfunction in patients with essential hypertension
    Chang FANG, Juan LEI, Shu-xian ZHOU, Yu-ling ZHANG, Gui-yi YUAN, Jing-feng WANG
    Chinese Medical Journal.2013; 126(4): 646.     CrossRef
  • Epicardial adipose tissue thickness is an indicator for coronary artery stenosis in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients: its assessment by cardiac magnetic resonance
    Hyun Kim, Kwang Kim, Hye-Jeong Lee, Hee Yu, Jae Moon, Eun Kang, Bong Cha, Hyun Lee, Byung-Wan Lee, Young Kim
    Cardiovascular Diabetology.2012; 11(1): 83.     CrossRef
Review
Role of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 4 in Regulation of Blood Glucose Levels
Nam Ho Jeoung, Robert A. Harris
Korean Diabetes J. 2010;34(5):274-283.   Published online October 31, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2010.34.5.274
  • 5,421 View
  • 69 Download
  • 47 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   

In the well-fed state a relatively high activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) reduces blood glucose levels by directing the carbon of pyruvate into the citric acid cycle. In the fasted state a relatively low activity of the PDC helps maintain blood glucose levels by conserving pyruvate and other three carbon compounds for gluconeogenesis. The relative activities of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs) and the opposing pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatases determine the activity of PDC in the fed and fasted states. Up regulation of PDK4 is largely responsible for inactivation of PDC in the fasted state. PDK4 knockout mice have lower fasting blood glucose levels than wild type mice, proving that up regulation of PDK4 is important for normal glucose homeostasis. In type 2 diabetes, up regulation of PDK4 also inactivates PDC, which promotes gluconeogenesis and thereby contributes to the hyperglycemia characteristic of this disease. When fed a high fat diet, wild type mice develop fasting hyperglycemia but PDK4 knockout mice remain euglycemic, proving that up regulation of PDK4 contributes to hyperglycemia in diabetes. These finding suggest PDK4 inhibitors might prove useful in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Hepatic fibrosis: Targeting peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha from mechanism to medicines
    Lijun Gong, Fang Wei, Frank J. Gonzalez, Guolin Li
    Hepatology.2023; 78(5): 1625.     CrossRef
  • microRNA-15b-5p shuttled by mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles protects podocytes from diabetic nephropathy via downregulation of VEGF/PDK4 axis
    Tiantian Zhao, Qingsong Jin, Lili Kong, Dongdong Zhang, Yaqin Teng, Liangyan Lin, Xiaoyan Yao, Yongjun Jin, Minglong Li
    Journal of Bioenergetics and Biomembranes.2022; 54(1): 17.     CrossRef
  • Circulating exosome-derived miR-122-5p is a novel biomarker for prediction of postoperative atrial fibrillation
    Chen Bai, Yisi Liu, Yichen Zhao, Qing Ye, Cheng Zhao, Yang Liu, Jiangang Wang
    Journal of Cardiovascular Translational Research.2022; 15(6): 1393.     CrossRef
  • The impact of different feeds on DNA methylation, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis signaling pathway, and gene expression of sheep muscle
    Feng Song, Zaccheaus Pazamilala Akonyani, Ying Li, Deqiqige Su, Lantuya Wu, Yue Pang, Sile Hu, Dubala Wu, Chun Li, Ding Yang, Jianghong Wu
    PeerJ.2022; 10: e13455.     CrossRef
  • Assessment of hepatic pyruvate carboxylase activity using hyperpolarized [1‐13C]‐l‐lactate
    Jun Chen, Edward P. Hackett, Zoltan Kovacs, Craig R. Malloy, Jae Mo Park
    Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.2021; 85(3): 1175.     CrossRef
  • Loss of metabolic flexibility as a result of overexpression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases in muscle, liver and the immune system: Therapeutic targets in metabolic diseases
    Jae‐Han Jeon, Themis Thoudam, Eun Jung Choi, Min‐Ji Kim, Robert A Harris, In‐Kyu Lee
    Journal of Diabetes Investigation.2021; 12(1): 21.     CrossRef
  • Exploring the Genetic Conception of Obesity via the Dual Role of FoxO
    Tapan Behl, Ishnoor Kaur, Aayush Sehgal, Sukhbir Singh, Gokhan Zengin, Nicoleta Negrut, Delia Carmen Nistor-Cseppento, Flavia Maria Pavel, Raluca Anca Corb Aron, Simona Bungau
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2021; 22(6): 3179.     CrossRef
  • Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs): an overview toward clinical applications
    Xiuxiu Wang, Xiaoyue Shen, Yuting Yan, Hongmin Li
    Bioscience Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • PDK2: An Underappreciated Regulator of Liver Metabolism
    Benjamin L. Woolbright, Robert A. Harris
    Livers.2021; 1(2): 82.     CrossRef
  • Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 and 2 deficiency reduces high-fat diet-induced hypertrophic obesity and inhibits the differentiation of preadipocytes into mature adipocytes
    Hyeon-Ji Kang, Byong-Keol Min, Won-Il Choi, Jae-Han Jeon, Dong Wook Kim, Sungmi Park, Yun-Kyung Lee, Hwa-jin Kim, Ju-Eun Byeon, Younghoon Go, Hye Jin Ham, Yong Hyun Jeon, Mi-Jin Kim, Jung Yi Lee, Adam R. Wende, Sung Hee Choi, Robert A. Harris, In-Kyu Lee
    Experimental & Molecular Medicine.2021; 53(9): 1390.     CrossRef
  • Drug evaluation based on phosphomimetic PDHA1 reveals the complexity of activity-related cell death in A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells
    Ling Jin, Minkyoung Cho, Bo-Sung Kim, Jung Ho Han, Sungmi Park, In-Kyu Lee, Dongryeol Ryu, Jae Ho Kim, Sung-Jin Bae, Ki-Tae Ha
    BMB Reports.2021; 54(11): 563.     CrossRef
  • Aberrant PDK4 Promoter Methylation Preceding Hyperglycemia in a Mouse Model
    Sulistyo Emantoko Dwi Putra, Stephanie Singajaya, Ferensia Thesman, Dicky Andhika Pranoto, Ricky Sanjaya, Yoanes Maria Vianney, Ida Bagus Made Artadana
    Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology.2020; 190(3): 1023.     CrossRef
  • Plasma Lipid Profile and Cardiac Risk Markers in Diabetic Nephropathy
    Nagendra Subba Rammaiah, Praveenkumar Deverbhavi, Kashinath Rattihalli Thirumala
    Journal of Evolution of Medical and Dental Sciences.2020; 9(8): 516.     CrossRef
  • The Role of High-Density Lipoproteins in Endothelial Cell Metabolism and Diabetes-Impaired Angiogenesis
    Khalia R. Primer, Peter J. Psaltis, Joanne T.M. Tan, Christina A. Bursill
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2020; 21(10): 3633.     CrossRef
  • The lncRNA ENST00000608794 acts as a competing endogenous RNA to regulate PDK4 expression by sponging miR-15b-5p in dexamethasone induced steatosis
    Fengqiong Liu, Qing Chen, Fa Chen, Jing Wang, Ruijie Gong, Baochang He
    Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids.2019; 1864(10): 1449.     CrossRef
  • The Changing Landscape of Pharmacotherapy for Diabetes Mellitus: A Review of Cardiovascular Outcomes
    Wu, Gunton
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2019; 20(23): 5853.     CrossRef
  • Emerging role of the orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor gamma in liver metabolic diseases
    Don-Kyu Kim, Hueng-Sik Choi
    Liver Research.2019; 3(2): 99.     CrossRef
  • Characterization of in vitro and in vivo metabolism of leelamine using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry
    Riya Shrestha, Jung Jae Jo, DooHyun Lee, Taeho Lee, Sangkyu Lee
    Xenobiotica.2019; 49(5): 577.     CrossRef
  • Proteomics of Rat Lungs Infected by Cryptococcus gattii Reveals a Potential Warburg-like Effect
    Rafael L. Rosa, Markus Berger, Lucélia Santi, David Driemeier, Paula Barros Terraciano, Alexandre R. Campos, Jorge A. Guimarães, Marilene H. Vainstein, John R. Yates, Walter O. Beys-da-Silva
    Journal of Proteome Research.2019; 18(11): 3885.     CrossRef
  • Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase suppression induces human tau phosphorylation by increasing whole body glucose levels in a C. elegans model of Alzheimer’s Disease
    Waqar Ahmad
    Experimental Brain Research.2018; 236(11): 2857.     CrossRef
  • Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ does not regulate glucose uptake and lactose synthesis in bovine mammary epithelial cells cultivated in vitro
    Jayant Lohakare, Johan S Osorio, Massimo Bionaz
    Journal of Dairy Research.2018; 85(3): 295.     CrossRef
  • Protective potential of Averrhoa bilimbi fruits in ameliorating the hepatic key enzymes in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats
    Surya B Kurup, Mini S
    Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy.2017; 85: 725.     CrossRef
  • Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 deficiency attenuates cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury
    Chang Joo Oh, Chae-Myeong Ha, Young-Keun Choi, Sungmi Park, Mi Sun Choe, Nam Ho Jeoung, Yang Hoon Huh, Hyo-Jeong Kim, Hee-Seok Kweon, Ji-min Lee, Sun Joo Lee, Jae-Han Jeon, Robert A. Harris, Keun-Gyu Park, In-Kyu Lee
    Kidney International.2017; 91(4): 880.     CrossRef
  • PDK4 Deficiency Induces Intrinsic Apoptosis in Response to Starvation in Fibroblasts from Doberman Pinschers with Dilated Cardiomyopathy
    Kathryn Taggart, Amara Estrada, Patrick Thompson, Francisco Lourenco, Sara Kirmani, Silveli Suzuki-Hatano, Christina A. Pacak
    BioResearch Open Access.2017; 6(1): 182.     CrossRef
  • High-salt intake negatively regulates fat deposition in mouse
    Huanxian Cui, Shuyan Yang, Maiqing Zheng, Ranran Liu, Guiping Zhao, Jie Wen
    Scientific Reports.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Effects of Myo-Inositol and B and D Vitamin Supplementation in the db/+ Mouse Model of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus
    Jasmine Plows, Florence Budin, Rebecka Andersson, Valerie Mills, Katherine Mace, Sandra Davidge, Mark Vickers, Philip Baker, Irma Silva-Zolezzi, Joanna Stanley
    Nutrients.2017; 9(2): 141.     CrossRef
  • Transcriptome analysis illuminates the nature of the intracellular interaction in a vertebrate-algal symbiosis
    John A Burns, Huanjia Zhang, Elizabeth Hill, Eunsoo Kim, Ryan Kerney
    eLife.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Equine performance genes and the future of doping in horseracing
    Tessa Wilkin, Anna Baoutina, Natasha Hamilton
    Drug Testing and Analysis.2017; 9(9): 1456.     CrossRef
  • Urine metabonomic study for blood-replenishing mechanism of Angelica sinensis in a blood-deficient mouse model
    Tao WANG, Hong-Guo SUN, Yong-Li HUA, Peng-Ling LI, Yan-Ming WEI
    Chinese Journal of Natural Medicines.2016; 14(3): 210.     CrossRef
  • MiR-155 Enhances Insulin Sensitivity by Coordinated Regulation of Multiple Genes in Mice
    Xiaolin Lin, Yujuan Qin, Junshuang Jia, Taoyan Lin, Xia Lin, Li Chen, Hui Zeng, Yanjiang Han, Lihong Wu, Shun Huang, Meng Wang, Shenhao Huang, Raoying Xie, Liqi Liang, Yu Liu, Ruiyu Liu, Tingting Zhang, Jing Li, Shengchun Wang, Penghui Sun, Wenhua Huang,
    PLOS Genetics.2016; 12(10): e1006308.     CrossRef
  • Antidiabetic efficacy of citronellol, a citrus monoterpene by ameliorating the hepatic key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats
    Subramani Srinivasan, Udaiyar Muruganathan
    Chemico-Biological Interactions.2016; 250: 38.     CrossRef
  • Inflammation increases pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) expression via the Jun N-Terminal Kinase (JNK) pathway in C2C12 cells
    Hana Park, Nam Ho Jeoung
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications.2016; 469(4): 1049.     CrossRef
  • Whole Blood Gene Expression Differentiates between Atrial Fibrillation and Sinus Rhythm after Cardioversion
    Kripa Raman, Stefanie Aeschbacher, Matthias Bossard, Thomas Hochgruber, Andreas J. Zimmermann, Beat A. Kaufmann, Katrin Pumpol, Peter Rickenbacker, Guillaume Paré, David Conen, Alena Talkachova
    PLOS ONE.2016; 11(6): e0157550.     CrossRef
  • Soybean Oil Is More Obesogenic and Diabetogenic than Coconut Oil and Fructose in Mouse: Potential Role for the Liver
    Poonamjot Deol, Jane R. Evans, Joseph Dhahbi, Karthikeyani Chellappa, Diana S. Han, Stephen Spindler, Frances M. Sladek, Jonathan Peterson
    PLOS ONE.2015; 10(7): e0132672.     CrossRef
  • Type 2 diabetes mellitus
    Ralph A. DeFronzo, Ele Ferrannini, Leif Groop, Robert R. Henry, William H. Herman, Jens Juul Holst, Frank B. Hu, C. Ronald Kahn, Itamar Raz, Gerald I. Shulman, Donald C. Simonson, Marcia A. Testa, Ram Weiss
    Nature Reviews Disease Primers.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinases: Therapeutic Targets for Diabetes and Cancers
    Nam Ho Jeoung
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2015; 39(3): 188.     CrossRef
  • Differential gene expression pattern in hypothalamus of chickens during fasting-induced metabolic reprogramming: Functions of glucose and lipid metabolism in the feed intake of chickens
    Xin-Ling Fang, Xiao-Tong Zhu, Sheng-Feng Chen, Zhi-Qi Zhang, Qing-Jie Zeng, Lin Deng, Jian-Long Peng, Jian-Jian Yu, Li-Na Wang, Song-Bo Wang, Ping Gao, Qing-Yan Jiang, Gang Shu
    Poultry Science.2014; 93(11): 2841.     CrossRef
  • The pivotal role of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases in metabolic flexibility
    Shuai Zhang, Matthew W Hulver, Ryan P McMillan, Mark A Cline, Elizabeth R Gilbert
    Nutrition & Metabolism.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Proteome-Based Systems Biology Analysis of the Diabetic Mouse Aorta Reveals Major Changes in Fatty Acid Biosynthesis as Potential Hallmark in Diabetes Mellitus–Associated Vascular Disease
    Holger Husi, Tom Van Agtmael, William Mullen, Ferdinand H. Bahlmann, Joost P. Schanstra, Antonia Vlahou, Christian Delles, Paul Perco, Harald Mischak
    Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics.2014; 7(2): 161.     CrossRef
  • Fatty acid elongase-5 (Elovl5) regulates hepatic triglyceride catabolism in obese C57BL/6J mice
    Sasmita Tripathy, Kelli A. Lytle, Robert D. Stevens, James R. Bain, Christopher B. Newgard, Andrew S. Greenberg, Li-Shin Huang, Donald B. Jump
    Journal of Lipid Research.2014; 55(7): 1448.     CrossRef
  • Mechanisms for the adverse effects of late gestational increases in maternal cortisol on the heart revealed by transcriptomic analyses of the fetal septum
    Elaine M. Richards, Charles E. Wood, Maria Belen Rabaglino, Andrew Antolic, Maureen Keller-Wood
    Physiological Genomics.2014; 46(15): 547.     CrossRef
  • Novel Agents for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes
    Ralph A. DeFronzo, Curtis L. Triplitt, Muhammad Abdul-Ghani, Eugenio Cersosimo
    Diabetes Spectrum.2014; 27(2): 100.     CrossRef
  • Serotonin (5-HT) Affects Expression of Liver Metabolic Enzymes and Mammary Gland Glucose Transporters during the Transition from Pregnancy to Lactation
    Jimena Laporta, Tonia L. Peters, Kathryn E. Merriman, Chad M. Vezina, Laura L. Hernandez, Julie A. Chowen
    PLoS ONE.2013; 8(2): e57847.     CrossRef
  • Dietary supplementation with vitamin E and C attenuates dexamethasone-induced glucose intolerance in rats
    Deon B. Williams, Zhongxiao Wan, Bruce C. Frier, Rhonda C. Bell, Catherine J. Field, David C. Wright
    American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.2012; 302(1): R49.     CrossRef
  • Association of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 gene polymorphisms with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome
    Seong-Su Moon, Jung-Eun Lee, Young-Sil Lee, Su-Won Kim, Nam Ho Jeoung, In-Kyu Lee, Jung-Guk Kim
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice.2012; 95(2): 230.     CrossRef
  • Sex-dependent differences in rat hepatic lipid accumulation and insulin sensitivity in response to diet-induced obesity
    Antònia Nadal-Casellas, Ana Maria Proenza, Isabel Lladó, Magdalena Gianotti
    Biochemistry and Cell Biology.2012; 90(2): 164.     CrossRef
  • Prednisolone-Induced Changes in Gene-Expression Profiles in Healthy Volunteers
    Erik JM Toonen, Wilco WM Fleuren, Ulla Nässander, Marie-José C van Lierop, Susanne Bauerschmidt, Wim HA Dokter, Wynand Alkema
    Pharmacogenomics.2011; 12(7): 985.     CrossRef
Original Articles
The Combination of Fasting Plasma Glucose and Glycosylated Hemoglobin as a Predictor for Type 2 Diabetes in Korean Adults.
Chan Hee Lee, Woo Jin Chang, Hyun Hee Chung, Hyun Jung Kim, Sang Hyun Park, Jun Sung Moon, Ji Eun Lee, Ji Sung Yoon, Kyung Ah Chun, Kyu Chang Won, Ihn Ho Cho, Hyoung Woo Lee
Korean Diabetes J. 2009;33(4):306-314.   Published online August 1, 2009
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2009.33.4.306
  • 3,155 View
  • 24 Download
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) for detection of diabetes is difficult to perform in clinical settings. The aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of a more practical detection test, combined fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), as a predictor of diabetes mellitus (DM) in a Korean sample. METHODS: We examined 2,045 (M = 1,276, mean age = 47.8 +/- 9.0 yrs) medical check-up program participants between January 2002 to December 2003. FPG, HbA1c and a number of other biochemical tests were performed at baseline and four after years after initial screening. Patients who originally presented with diabetes were excluded. The characteristics of newly-diagnosed DM patients and non-diabetic patients were compared. RESULTS: The incidence of newly diagnosed diabetes was 1.6% (32/2,045) after four years of follow up. The subjects in the DM group were older, had higher levels of SBP, DBP, FPG, HbA1c, triglyceride, HDL cholesterol, GGT and LDH (P < 0.05). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, FPG (odds ratio [OR] 1.124) and HbA1c (OR 4.794) were significantly correlated with onset of diabetes (P < 0.05). The interaction parameter between FPG and HbA1c was more than 1.0, indicating that the two effects are synergistic. The predictive cut-off values of HbA1c and FPG were 5.35% (area under curve [AUC] = 0.944) and 102.5 mg/dL (AUC = 0.930), respectively. CONCLUSION: The combination of HbA1c above 5.35% and FPG above 102.5 mg/dL predicted the onset of diabetes in a Korean sample. These results suggest that the combination of FPG and HbA1c may be useful for predicting progression to type 2 diabetes in east Asians.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Distribution and Characteristics of Abnormal Findings Regarding Fasting Plasma Glucose and HbA1c - Based on Adults Except for Known Diabetes
    Seyoung Kwon, Youngak Na
    The Korean Journal of Clinical Laboratory Science.2017; 49(3): 239.     CrossRef
  • Factors Affecting Diabetic Screening Behavior of Korean Adults: A Multilevel Analysis
    Hyeongsu Kim, Minjung Lee, Haejoon Kim, Kunsei Lee, Sounghoon Chang, Vitna Kim, Jun Pyo Myong, Soyoun Jeon
    Asian Nursing Research.2013; 7(2): 67.     CrossRef
  • Impact of HbA1c Criterion on the Detection of Subjects with Increased Risk for Diabetes among Health Check-Up Recipients in Korea
    Hong-Kyu Kim, Sung-Jin Bae, Jaeone Choe
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2012; 36(2): 151.     CrossRef
  • The Utility of HbA1c as a Diagnostic Criterion of Diabetes
    Hee-Jung Kim, Eun Young Choi, Eal Whan Park, Yoo Seock Cheong, Hong-Yoen Lee, Ji Hyun Kim
    Korean Journal of Family Medicine.2011; 32(7): 383.     CrossRef
  • Predictive Clinical Parameters for the Therapeutic Efficacy of Sitagliptin in Korean Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
    Soon Ae Kim, Woo Ho Shim, Eun Hae Lee, Young Mi Lee, Sun Hee Beom, Eun Sook Kim, Jeong Seon Yoo, Ji Sun Nam, Min Ho Cho, Jong Suk Park, Chul Woo Ahn, Kyung Rae Kim
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2011; 35(2): 159.     CrossRef
  • Optimal range of HbA1c for the prediction of future diabetes: A 4-year longitudinal study
    Ji Cheol Bae, Eun Jung Rhee, Won Young Lee, Se Eun Park, Cheol Young Park, Ki Won Oh, Sung Woo Park, Sun Woo Kim
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice.2011; 93(2): 255.     CrossRef
  • The Combination of Fasting Plasma Glucose and Glycosylated Hemoglobin as a Predictor for Type 2 Diabetes in Korean Adults (Korean Diabetes J 33(4):306-314, 2009)
    Soo Lim
    Korean Diabetes Journal.2009; 33(5): 448.     CrossRef
  • The Combination of Fasting Plasma Glucose and Glycosylated Hemoglobin as a Predictor for Type 2 Diabetes in Korean Adults (Korean Diabetes J 33(4):306-314, 2009)
    Chan Hee Lee, Hyoung Woo Lee
    Korean Diabetes Journal.2009; 33(5): 451.     CrossRef
Evaluation of Fasting Plasma Glucose as a Screening for Diabetes Mellitus in Middle-aged Adults of Naju Country.
Jin Hwa Kim, Mi Ah Han, Chol Jin Park, Il Goo Park, Ji Hye Shin, Sang Yong Kim, So Yeon Ryu, Hak Yeon Bae
Korean Diabetes J. 2008;32(4):328-337.   Published online August 1, 2008
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2008.32.4.328
  • 2,604 View
  • 23 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
The criteria for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus have been modified by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) in 1997. The ADA proposed that the diagnosis of diabetes be defined by a fasting plasma glucose (FPG) of 7.0 mmol/L. Disagreement has been reported between criteria based on FPG and postchallenge 2-h plasma glucose (2-h PG). The aim of the present study is to assess the FPG criteria as the diagnostic screening test for diabetes in Korean middle-aged adults in comparison to the 2-h PG criteria. METHODS: Randomly selected 1,731 subjects (679 men and 1,052 women) aged 40~70 years (mean age: 58.4 +/- 7.89 years) without previously diagnosed diabetes completed 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). We assessed the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and the level of agreement (kappa statistics) according to the different diagnostic glucose categories. RESULTS: The frequency of newly diagnosed diabetes was 2.7% (n = 51) using the FPG criteria only; 6.4% (n = 120) using the 2-h PG criteria only; and 6.9% (n = 130) using concentrations of > or = 7.0 mmol/L for FPG or > or = 11.1 mmol/L for 2-h PG. Of the 120 subjects with diabetes by the 2-h PG criteria, 65.8% (n = 79) were not diagnosed with diabetes according to FPG concentration. The level of agreement between two diagnostic criteria was low (kappa = 0.268). The receiver operating characterstic (ROC) curve analysis determined FPG of 5.6 mmol/L to yield optimal sensitivity and specificity corresponding to 2-h PG 11.1 mmol/L. CONCLUSION: The findings in this study demonstrate that the discordance between the FPG and 2-h PG criteria in the diagnosis of diabetes in Korean middle-aged adults is large. We suggest that IFG group (FPG 5.6~6.9 mmol/L) were performed 75 g OGTT for diagnosing diabetes mellitus in Korean middle-aged adults.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Distribution and Characteristics of Abnormal Findings Regarding Fasting Plasma Glucose and HbA1c - Based on Adults Except for Known Diabetes
    Seyoung Kwon, Youngak Na
    The Korean Journal of Clinical Laboratory Science.2017; 49(3): 239.     CrossRef
  • Gender differences in metabolic syndrome components among the Korean 66-year-old population with metabolic syndrome
    Sangjin Lee, Young Ko, Chanyeong Kwak, Eun-shil Yim
    BMC Geriatrics.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • 2011 Clinical Practice Guidelines for Type 2 Diabetes in Korea
    Seung-Hyun Ko, Sung-Rea Kim, Dong-Joon Kim, Seung-Joon Oh, Hye-Jin Lee, Kang-Hee Shim, Mi-Hye Woo, Jun-Young Kim, Nan-Hee Kim, Jae-Taik Kim, Chong Hwa Kim, Hae Jin Kim, In-Kyung Jeong, Eun-Kyung Hong, Jae-Hyoung Cho, Ji-Oh Mok, Kun-Ho Yoon
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2011; 35(5): 431.     CrossRef
  • Associated Factors of Impaired Fasting Glucose in Some Korean Rural Adults
    Hye Eun Yun, Mi-ah Han, Ki Soon Kim, Jong Park, Myeng Guen Kang, So Yeon Ryu
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2010; 43(4): 309.     CrossRef
  • Comparing Survival Functions with Doubly Interval-Censored Data: An Application to Diabetes Surveyed by Korean Cancer Prevention Study
    Sun-Ha Jee, Chung-Mo Nam, Jin-Heum Kim
    Korean Journal of Applied Statistics.2009; 22(3): 595.     CrossRef
Clinical Meaning of Postprandial Insulin Secretory Function in Korean Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.
Wan Sub Shim, Soo Kyung Kim, Hae Jin Kim, Se Eun Park, Eun Seok Kang, Yu Mie Rhee, Chul Woo Ahn, Sung Kil Lim, Kyung Rae Kim, Hyun Chul Lee, Bong Soo Cha
Korean Diabetes J. 2005;29(4):367-377.   Published online July 1, 2005
  • 1,186 View
  • 25 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Impaired pancreatic beta-cell responsiveness is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Postprandial insulin deficiency is closely related with fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c and insulin responses to meals, but most studies examining postprandial beta-cell responsiveness have been limited by the small number of type 2 diabetic patients examined. The aim of this study was to evaluate fasting and postprandial insulin secretions in relation to the duration of diabetes, BMI and glycemic control in a large number of patients with variable disease durations. METHODS: We evaluated the fasting plasma glucose, insulin, C-peptide, HbA1c, BMI, postprandial 2 hour glucose, insulin and C-peptide in 1,170(male 662, female 508, age 54.6+/-1.6 years, duration of diabetes 5.2+/-6.3 years, BMI 25.4+/-3.3kg/m(2)) type 2 diabetic patients. The delta C-peptide, delta insulin, fasting(M0) and postprandial(M1) pancreatic beta-cell responsiveness were also calculated. The subjects were divided into three groups according to their duration of diabetes, BMI, and fasting and postprandial C-peptide levels. After adjusting for age, sex and BMI, the correlation of diabetes and HbA1c were correlated parameters. RESULTS: In the group of patients whose duration of diabetes was longer than 10 years, the BMI, fasting, postprandial and delta C-peptide, and M0 and M1 were significantly lower, but age, fasting and postprandial glucose, as well as HbA1c were significantly higher than those in the other groups. There were no significant differences in the fasting and postprandial glucose and HbA1c according to their fasting C-peptide tertiles. However, in the group of patients with the highest postprandial C-peptide tertile, the fasting and postprandial glucose and HbA1c were significantly lower than those in the other groups. The duration of diabetes, after adjustment of age, sex and BMI, was negatively correlated with the fasting, postprandial and delta C-peptide, M0 and M1, but was positively correlated with the fasting and postprandial 2 hour glucose and HbA1c. The HbA1c after adjustment of age, sex and BMI, was positively correlated with duration of diabetes, and fasting and postprandial glucose, but was negatively correlated with fasting postprandial and delta C-peptide, M0 and M1. CONCLUSION: Although the fasting and postprandial insulin secretions were decreased with duration of diabetes, the decrease in the postprandial insulin secretion was more prominent. The postprandial pancreatic responsiveness may be a more important factor in predicting glycemic control in Korean type 2 diabetic patients than the fasting pancreatic responsiveness.
The Relationship Between the C1818T Polymorphism in Exon 4 of the klotho Gene with Fasting Glucose and Insulin Levels in Korean Women.
Ki Won Oh, Eun Joo Yun, Eun Jung Rhee, Won Young Lee, Ki Hyun Baek, Kun Ho Yoon, Moo Il Kang, Seong Gyun Kim, Cheol Young Park, Sung Hee Ihm, Moon Gi Choi, Hyung Joon Yoo, Sung Woo Park
Korean Diabetes J. 2005;29(3):189-197.   Published online May 1, 2005
  • 1,322 View
  • 17 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
A novel gene, termed klotho has been identified as a suppressor of several aging phenotypes, and a genetic defect of klotho in mice resulted in a syndrome resembling human aging, i.e., a short lifespan, infertility, arteriosclerosis, skin atrophy, osteoporosis, and pulmonary emphysema. Since klotho mice also showed an abnormal glucose metabolism, we investigated the relationship between the C1818T polymorphism in exon 4 of the klotho gene and fasting glucose and insulin resistance in Korean women to observe its contribution to glucose metabolism. METHODS: The weight, height, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, insulin, and lipid profiles were measured in 241 women(mean age, 51.2+/-7.0yr) by using the standard methods. Homeostasis model assessment(HOMA)-insulin resistance(IR), the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index(QUICKI) and HOMAbeta-cell were calculated. The genotyping of the C1818T polymorphism in exon 4 of the klotho gene was performed by allelic discrimination with using a 5' nuclease polymerase chain reaction assay. RESULTS: The allele frequencies were 0.805 for the C allele and 0.195 for the T allele, and they were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium(P=0.290). The mean fasting blood glucose(P= 0.005) and HOMA IR(P=0.035) were significantly higher in the T allele carriers compared with the non-carriers. After adjustment was made for age, fasting blood glucose was persistently significant(P=0.015), but the HOMA-IR became marginally significant(P=0.063). In the premenopausal women, the T allele carriers showed a higher mean fasting blood glucose(P=0.038), insulin(P=0.024), HOMA-IR(P=0.010), total cholesterol(P=0.039), and triglyceride levels(P=0.031) than in the non-carriers. After adjustment was made for age, the fasting blood glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR and triglyceride were persistently significant(P= 0.043, P=0.026, P=0.011, P=0.040). Also, the QUICKI, total cholesterol and low-density ilpo-protein cholesterol became marginally significant(P=0.073, P=0.061, P=0.098). For the postmenopausal women, the T allele carriers showed a tendency for higher mean fasting blood glucose levels(P=0.065) and lower HOMA beta-cell levels(P=0.085) than in the noncarriers. These differences became non-significant after adjustment was made for age. CONCLUSION: We observed that the C1818T polymorphism in exon 4 of the klotho gene was partly associated with glucose metabolism in Korean women. Also, these data suggest that the C1818T polymorphism is related with some cardiovascular risk factors in Korean women. The mechanism linking this gene with glucose metabolism warrants further study
Prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus(Fasting Plasma Glucose by the ADA Criteria) and Impaired Fasting Glucose according to Anthropometric Characteristics and Dietary Habits: 1998 National Health and Nutrition Survey.
Chul Sik Kim, Eun Kyong Jeong, Jina Park, Min Ho Cho, Ji Sun Nam, Hai Jin Kim, Jee Hyun Kong, Jong Suk Park, Joo Young Nam, Dol Mi Kim, Chul Woo Ahn, Bong Soo Cha, Sung Kil Lim, Kyung Rae Kim, Hyun Chul Lee, Chung Mo Nam
Korean Diabetes J. 2005;29(2):151-166.   Published online March 1, 2005
  • 1,095 View
  • 18 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
The study is based on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in Korea(1998). With these data, we want to predict the prevalence of diabetes mellitus(DM) and impaired fasting glucose(IFG), By investigating anthropometric characteristics and dietary intake habits, we also wanted to analyze any significant correlation between those factors and the prevalences of DM and IFG. METHODS: The study group was comprised of 8,166 people, a representative group of Koreans, who had undergone a health check-up and food intake survey among the total 39,331 members of 12,189 families who were surveyed. RESULTS: The final results are as the follows. 1) The peak prevalence of DM was 15.92% among women in their sixties and 18.21% among men in their fifties, and that of IFG was found to be 16.27% of women in their seventies and 14.09% of men in their sixties. 2) When analyzing the eating habits and the prevalences of DM and IFG, we found that women with more glucose intake had a lesser risk of DM, but this was of no statistical significance. 3) In men, age, total cholesterol, triglyceride(TG), and hypertension(HTN) were revealed as meaningful factors and in women, age, TG, and HTN were revealed as meaningful factors. As to the IFG, in females, age and TG were meaningful factors, and in males, age, TG, the waist/hip ratio (WHR), and body mass index (BMI) were meaningful factors. CONCLUSION: Although this study could not demonstrate meaningful correlation between diet habits and DM, the prevalence of IFG and the recent increase in the prevalence of DM in Koreans, owing to alterations in their diet habits, demands further organized group study for a better understanding of their relationship
Expression of ghrelin and its receptor according to feeding state in rats.
Min Seon Kim, Cho Ya Yoon, Young Joo Park, Hyung Kyu Park, Chen Ji Jin, Kyong Han Park, Chan Soo Shin, Kyong Soo Park, Seong Youn Kim, Bo Youn Cho, Hong Kyu Lee
Korean Diabetes J. 2002;26(3):169-178.   Published online June 1, 2002
  • 984 View
  • 21 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Ghrelin is a newly discovered gut peptide, produced mainly in the stomach, which is secreted into the circulating blood and acts on the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland. Although ghrelin was originally identified as an endogenous growth hormone secretagogue, recent studies have suggested its role is in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the expression of ghrelin in the stomach, and of its receptors in the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland in relation to the feeding state. METHODS: Sprague Dawley male rats, divided into 3 groups, freely fed, fasted for 48 hrs and fasted for 48 hrs followed by feeding for 24 hrs, were investigated. The stomach fundus, the hypothalamus and the pituitary glands were collected. The gastric ghrelin mRNA expression was determined by Northern blot analysis and the ghrelin protein by immunohistochemistry. The ghrelin receptor mRNA levels in the hypothalamus and anterior pituitary gland were determined by real time PCR. RESULTS: The ghrelin mRNA levels in the stomach were increased by fasting but reduced again by allowing feeding. The number of ghrelin-immunoreactive gastric epithelial cells tended to increase with fasting. Moreover, the ghrelin receptor mRNA levels increased fold in the hypothalamus, and about 3 fold in the anterior pituitary gland harvested from the rats that had fasted for 48 hrs compared to those that were freely fed. CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrate that expression of both ghrelin in stomach and its receptor in target organs increased in the fasted state, which would be helpful for magnifying the orexigenic effect of ghrelin in the negative energy balance state. Dynamic changes in ghrelin and ghrelin receptor according to altered metabolic state may suggest a physiologic role of ghrelin in the regulation of energy homeostasis.
Comparison of Clinical Characteristics of Impaired Fasting Glucose with Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Yonchon County.
In Kyong Jeong, Min Kyong Moon, Sang Wan Kim, Young Joo Park, Sun Yuk Kim, Chan Soo Shin, Do Joon Park, Kyong Soo Park, Seong Yeon Kim, Bo Youn Cho, Noe Kyeong Kim, Hong Kyu Lee
Korean Diabetes J. 2000;24(1):71-77.   Published online January 1, 2001
  • 1,033 View
  • 21 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
To compare the clinical characteristics of 1997 American Diabetes Association (ADA) impaired fasting glucose (IFG) based on fasting plasma glucose (FPG) with World Health Organization (WHO) impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) based on oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in a Korean population. METHODS: The analyses were based on the data of 2,251 subjects aged 30-80 years obtained from the surveys of Yonchon County in Korea in 1993, and the data of 1084 subjects participated in the follow-up survey in 1995. Prevalence of glucose tolerance categories was obtained by using WHO and ADA criteria, and the level of agreement was estimated by index. Cardiovascular risk profile and the incidence of diabetes based on the ADA criteria after 2 years were compared by focusing on the discordant ctiagnostic categories namely IGT/NFS in which the subjects were diagnosed as IGT by WHO criteria but normal fasting glucose(NFG) by ADA criteria and NGT/IFG diagnosed as normal glucose tolerance(NGT) by WHO but IFG by ADA. Results The ADA criteria failed to diagnose 69% of IGT patients, that is 62% of them were considered normal and 7% as diabetes. The overall agreement was poor (x statistics = 0.32, p<0.05). Subjects classified into IGT/NFG or NGT/IFG showed the worse cardiovascular risk profile and higher incidence of diabetes than NGT/NFG. Especially, subjects with NGT/IFG exhibited higher incidence of diabetes than those with IGT/NFG. CONCLUSION: Although IFG predicts subsequent development of diabetes much better than IGT, the vast majority of the subjects with IGT will be missed according to ADA criteria based on FPG only. Consequently FPG alone could be an inadequate substitute for the OGTT.

Diabetes Metab J : Diabetes & Metabolism Journal