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Volume 32(1); February 2008
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Review
Insulin Resistance in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.
Yeon Ah Sung
Korean Diabetes J. 2008;32(1):1-6.   Published online February 1, 2008
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2008.32.1.1
  • 2,297 View
  • 33 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the commonest endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age and now recognized as an important metabolic and reproductive disorder. The majority of women with PCOS have insulin resistance and this is regarded to have a central etiological role in PCOS. Insulin resistance and concomitant hyperinsulinemia modifies reproductive function by driving androgen production, suppression of sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and disruption of insulin signaling pathways in the central nervous system. Insulin resistance, together with defects in insulin secretion, confers markedly increased risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome. There are post-binding defects in insulin receptor signaling, with selective resistance to insulin's metabolic actions and preserved other actions. Genetic and environmental abnormalities interact to produce peripheral insulin resistance in PCOS. The numerous in vivo and in vitro data supporting the central role of insulin resistance in the pathogenesis of PCOS have led a new therapy for PCOS with insulin-sensitizing agents.

Citations

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  • Epidemiology and Diagnostic Criteria of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
    Hyejin Lee, Yeon-Ah Sung
    The Journal of Korean Diabetes.2015; 16(3): 189.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of Apelin and Insulin Resistance in Patients with PCOS and Therapeutic Effect of Drospirenone-Ethinylestradiol Plus Metformin
    Xianchang Sun, Xingguo Wu, Yan Zhou, Xinyan Yu, Wenjuan Zhang
    Medical Science Monitor.2015; 21: 2547.     CrossRef
  • Hyperandrogenism in Women: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
    Yeon-Ah Sung
    Hanyang Medical Reviews.2012; 32(4): 197.     CrossRef
  • Adiponectin in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
    Hyun-Young Shin, Duk-Chul Lee, Ji-Won Lee
    Korean Journal of Family Medicine.2011; 32(4): 243.     CrossRef
  • Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in Korean Women: Clinical Characteristics and Diagnostic Criteria
    Yeon-Ah Sung
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2011; 26(3): 203.     CrossRef
Editorial
Diabetic Nephropathy - Preventive effects of lithospermic acid B (LAB).
Eun Gyoung Hong
Korean Diabetes J. 2008;32(1):7-9.   Published online February 1, 2008
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2008.32.1.7
  • 2,029 View
  • 18 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
No abstract available.

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  • Natural Compounds as Source of Aldose Reductase (AR) Inhibitors for the Treatment of Diabetic Complications: A Mini Review
    Ajmer Singh Grewal, Komal Thapa, Neha Kanojia, Neelam Sharma, Sukhbir Singh
    Current Drug Metabolism.2020; 21(14): 1091.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Protective Effects of Lithospermic Acid B on Diabetic Nephropathy in OLETF Rats Comparing with Amlodipine and Losartan.
Eun Seok Kang, Beom Seok Kim, Chul Hoon Kim, Gi Ho Seo, Seung Jin Han, Sung Wan Chun, Kyu Yeon Hur, Chul Woo Ahn, Hunjoo Ha, Mankil Jung, Bong Soo Cha, Hyun Chul Lee
Korean Diabetes J. 2008;32(1):10-20.   Published online February 1, 2008
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2008.32.1.10
  • 2,510 View
  • 19 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Lithospermic acid B (LAB), an active component isolated from Salvia miltiorrhizae, has been reported to have renoprotective effects in type 1 and type 2 diabetic animal models. We examined the effects of LAB on the prevention of diabetic nephropathy compared with amlodipine, a calcium channel blocker, and losartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker, in Otsuka Long-Evans-Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats, an animal model of type 2 diabetes. METHODS: LAB (20 mg/kg), amlodipine (10 mg/kg), or losartan (10 mg/kg) was given orally once daily to 10-week-old male OLETF rats for 28 weeks. RESULTS: None of LAB, losartan, and amlodipine exhibited effects on blood glucose levels. Treatment with amlodipine or losartan resulted in similar reductions in blood pressure; however, LAB was less effective in lowering blood pressure. Albuminuria was markedly suppressed by losartan and LAB, but not by amlodipine. LAB treatment decreased levels of renal lipid peroxidation, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that LAB has beneficial effects on the diabetic nephropathy in OLETF rats by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammation as potent as losartan.

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  • An Overview on Naturally Occurring Phytoconstituent: Lithospermic Acid
    Bhupesh Chander Semwal, Amjad Hussain, Sonia Singh
    The Natural Products Journal.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
The Effect of alpha-Lipoic Acid on Proteinuria and Renal TGFbeta Expression in Obese Type 2 Diabetic Rat Model.
Seok Woo Kang, Seong Jin Lee, Dong Sun Kim, Tae Wha Kim
Korean Diabetes J. 2008;32(1):21-29.   Published online February 1, 2008
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2008.32.1.21
  • 2,521 View
  • 20 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
It is well known that renal TGFbeta expression is related to the development of diabetic nephropathy. Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA), a potent antioxidant and cofactor of mitochondrial respiratory enzymes, can improve the insulin resistance and the vascular endothelial dysfunction, and suppresses the development of diabetic vascular complications. This study was undertaken to investigate whether ALA could reduce urinary protein excretion and renal TGFbeta protein expression in obese type 2 diabetes mellitus animal model, Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rat. METHODS: Obese 30 male OLETF rats were randomly divided to 3 groups at the age of 30 weeks. The rats in the Control group fed normal rat chow while the rats in the ALA group were fed with rat chow containing ALA (0.5% of food weight). Ten rats in the Pair-fed group were fed with normal rat chow, but were given the same amount of food as consumed by the ALA group. During 5 weeks of ALA feeding, food intake and body weight were checked in metabolic chamber. Blood glucose levels, HbA1c and urinary protein excretion were measured at 30 weeks and 35 weeks of age, and renal TGFbeta protein expression at 35 weeks of age was measured by Western blot and represented by relative unit (RU). Immunohistochemical staining for TGFbeta protein in renal tissue was also examined at 35 weeks of age. RESULTS: Food intake, body weight, blood glucose levels, HbA1c and urinary protein excretion among the Control, ALA and Pair-fed groups at 30 weeks of age were not different. At 35 weeks of age, food intake was significantly decreased in the ALA group than the Control group (Control group vs. ALA group, 27.7 +/- 1.1 g/day vs. 22.4 +/- 1.4 g/day, P < 0.001), and body weight was significantly decreased in the ALA group than the Control and Pair-fed groups (Control group: 694.4 +/- 10.3 g, ALA group: 600.4 +/- 7.4 g, Pair-fed group: 685.4 +/- 11.6 g, P < 0.001). Blood glucose levels were significantly decreased in the ALA group than the Control and Pair-fed groups (Control group: 157.7 +/- 4.6 mg/dL, ALA group: 130.7 +/- 4.8 mg/dL, Pair-fed group: 153.7 +/- 3.3 mg/dL, P < 0.001) although blood glucose levels from 30 weeks to 34 weeks of age and HbA1c at 35 weeks of age were not different among the groups. Urinary protein excretion and renal TGFbeta protein expression were significantly decreased in the ALA group than the Control and Pair-fed groups (urinary protein excretion, Control group: 5.033 +/- 0.254 mg/mgCr, ALA group: 3.633 +/- 0.303 mg/mgCr, Pair-fed group: 4.977 +/- 0.339 mg/mgCr, P < 0.001; renal TGFbeta protein expression, Control group: 7.09 +/- 0.17 RU, ALA group: 4.14 +/- 0.26 RU, Pair-fed group: 7.00 +/- 0.29 RU, P < 0.001). In the ALA group at 35 weeks of age, urinary protein excretion and renal TGFbeta protein expression were positively related in the Control, ALA and Pair-fed groups (Control group, r = 0.847, P = 0.002; ALA group, r = 0.954, P < 0.001; Pair-fed group, r = 0.858, P = 0.002). TGFbeta staining in glomeruli was observed in all groups but was decreased in the ALA group at 35 weeks of age. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that ALA may prevent the increase of food intake, body weight, blood glucose, urinary protein excretion and renal TGFbeta protein expression in obese type 2 diabetic rat model. The effect of ALA on diabetic nephropathy presented as proteinuria and renal TGFbeta expression in diabetic patients needs to be further clarified.

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  • Dietary alpha-lipoic acid boosts growth, immune-antioxidant traits, behavior, and transcriptomes of antioxidant, apoptosis, and immune-related genes to combat cold stress in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)
    Amany Behairy, Hanan A. Ghetas, Noura A. Abd-Allah, Walaa El-Houseiny, Ahmed H. Arisha, Mohamed M. M. Metwally, Basma A. Elshafey, Adham A. Al-Sagheer, Engy M. M. Mohamed
    Aquaculture International.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Association between Apolipoprotein E Polymorphism and Type 2 Diabetes in Subjects Aged 65 or Over.
You Jin Lee, Hak Chul Jang, Eun Hye Kim, Hye Jin Kim, Seok Bum Lee, Sung Hee Choi, Soo Lim, Kyoung Un Park, Young Joo Park, Ki Woong Kim
Korean Diabetes J. 2008;32(1):30-37.   Published online February 1, 2008
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2008.32.1.30
  • 2,292 View
  • 27 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Increased prevalence of diabetes in recent years is linked with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Apolipoprotein E (apo E) polymorphism is well known to be related to hyperlipidemia and coronary heart disease, but only a few studies investigated the association between apo E polymorphism and diabetes or insulin resistance. In Korea, two studies with relatively small subjects reported controversial results. Therefore, we investigated the association between apo E polymorphism and diabetes in elderly community population. METHODS: 982 elderly people aged 65 or over in Seongnam city were enrolled. We measured anthropometric variables and blood pressure and performed biochemical tests including fasting glucose, fasting insulin, HbA1c, and lipid profiles. Apo E polymorphism was determined by PCR-RFLP method. RESULTS: Frequencies of apo E isoforms and alleles were similar to those of other reports. Subjects with e4 allele had significantly higher total and LDL-cholesterol levels. However, there were no differences in cholesterol levels between normal subjects and diabetes. Diabetes was not related to apo E polymorphism. CONCLUSION: In Korean aged 65 or over, subjects with diabetes didn't have increased total or LDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, and decreased HDL-cholesterol levels. Diabetes and apo E polymorphism were not related.

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  • Association of APOE genotype with lipid profiles and type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Korean population
    Jung Yeon Seo, Byeong Ju Youn, Hyun Sub Cheong, Hyoung Doo Shin
    Genes & Genomics.2021; 43(7): 725.     CrossRef
  • Sarcopenia, Frailty, and Diabetes in Older Adults
    Hak Chul Jang
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2016; 40(3): 182.     CrossRef
Mutation Screening of HNF-1alpha Gene in Korean Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.
Hun Sung Kim, Sun Hee Hwang, Eun Sun Choi, So Young Park, Chang Hoon Yim, Ki Ok Han, Hyun Koo Yoon, Ho Yeon Chung, Kyung Seon Kim, Jeong Bok, Jong Young Lee, Sung Hoon Kim
Korean Diabetes J. 2008;32(1):38-43.   Published online February 1, 2008
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2008.32.1.38
  • 2,572 View
  • 21 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
S: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance with onset or first detection during pregnancy and mostly caused by insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction like type 2 diabetes. However, autoimmune or monogenic diabetes can contribute to GDM. Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is a monogenic form of diabetes characterized by an early age of onset and an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. Most MODY cases are attributable to mutations in HNF-1alpha gene, also known as MODY3. We investigated whether mutations in HNF-1alpha gene are present in Korean women with GDM. METHODS: A total of 96 Korean women with GDM who have a family history of DM were screened for mutations in the HNF-1alpha gene. We evaluated the clinical characteristics of GDM women with HNF-1alpha gene mutations. RESULTS: Five of 96 patients (5.2%) were found to have a mutation in HNF-1alpha gene. Four of those (-23C > G, 833G > A (Arg278Gln), 923C > T, IVS5 + 106A > G) were novel and one (-124G > C) in promoter region was reported in previous study. The mean age of GDM women with mutations of HNF-1alpha gene was 34 years. Four women with MODY3 gene mutations required insulin therapy during pregnancy. GDM women with MODY3 gene mutations appeared to be decreased insulin secretion (HOMA-%B) than those without mutations. CONCLUSIONS: We have found the existence of MODY3 as well as novel HNF-1alpha gene mutations in Korean women with GDM.

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  • Update on Monogenic Diabetes in Korea
    Ye Seul Yang, Soo Heon Kwak, Kyong Soo Park
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2020; 44(5): 627.     CrossRef
  • Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young: What Do Clinicians Need to Know?
    Sung-Hoon Kim
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2015; 39(6): 468.     CrossRef
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs) Overexpression in the Retina and Serum and Lens Opacities of Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Rats.
Young Sook Kim, Eun Jin Sohn, Chan Sik Kim, Yun Mi Lee, Dong Ho Jung, Nan Hee Kim, Hyun Young Lee, Jung Yeon Kim, Jin Sook Kim
Korean Diabetes J. 2008;32(1):44-52.   Published online February 1, 2008
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2008.32.1.44
  • 2,202 View
  • 29 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Advanced Glycation End products (AGEs) have been implicated in the development of diabetic retinopathy. In this study, we examined the expression of VEGF and AGEs in the retina and serum, apoptosis in the retina, and lens opacities in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. METHODS: The localization of VEGF and AGEs in the retina of STZ-induced diabetic rats was determined by immunohistochemical analysis, and apoptotic cell death was assessed using the TUNEL assay. In the serum, STZ-induced diabetic rats were assayed for VEGF and AGEs by ELISA. Lenses were also isolated to detect the opacity. RESULTS: Expression of VEGF and accumulation of AGEs were significantly increased in the retinal ganglion cell layers (GCL) and nuclear cell layers (NCL) of STZ-induced diabetic rats compared to normal control rats. In addition to cellular expression, serum VEGF and AGEs levels were also increased significantly in STZ-diabetic rats compared to normal rats (both P < 0.001) and there was a significant correlation between the serum VEGF and AGEs levels (r = 0.504). The lens opaque density of STZ-induced diabetic rats were significantly higher than in normal rats (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: AGEs could be involved in the development of diabetic retinopathy through the induction of VEGF. One could possibly correlate this lens opaque formation with elevation of AGE induced VEGF level. Thus, this study should be considered as a basic research for studying pathology of the retina and lens in diabetic experimental models.
Prevalence and Clinical Characteristics of Aspirin Resistance in the Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.
Mi Yeon Kang, Young Min Cho, Hyun Kyung Kim, Jee Hyun An, Hwa Young Ahn, Ji Won Yoon, Hoon Sung Choi, Jie Seon Lee, Kyong Soo Park, Seong Yeon Kim, Hong Kyu Lee
Korean Diabetes J. 2008;32(1):53-59.   Published online February 1, 2008
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2008.32.1.53
  • 2,612 View
  • 25 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
We examined the prevalence and clinical characteristics of aspirin resistance in the Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS: We studied 181 Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were taking aspirin (100 mg/day for > or = 3 months) and no other antiplatelet agents. The VerifyNow System was used to determine aspirin responsiveness. Aspirin resistance was defined as an aspirin reaction unit (ARU) > or = 550. We measured the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) and ankle-brachial index (ABI) to evaluate arteriosclerosis. The anthropometric parameters, electrocardiogram, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, lipid profiles, hemoglobin A1c, highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), homocysteine, and microalbuminuria were measured in each patient. RESULTS: The prevalence of aspirin resistance in type 2 diabetic patients was 9.4% (17 of 181). Those who had aspirin resistance were older than those without aspirin resistance (64.6 +/- 10.6 vs. 59.8 +/- 8.1, P = 0.024). Aspirin resistance was not associated with fasting plasma glucose, total cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, hemoglobin A1c, hsCRP, homocysteine, microalbuminuria, ABI, CAVI, and body mass index. CONCLUSION: Prevalence of aspirin resistance in the Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus was 9.4%. Although aspirin resistance was associated with old age, we could not find any good clinical parameter to predict it. Therefore, aspirin resistance should be evaluated in diabetic patients taking aspirin for prevention of cardiovascular complications.

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  • Long Non-Coding RNA H19 Positively Associates With Aspirin Resistance in the Patients of Cerebral Ischemic Stroke
    Jue Wang, Bin Cao, Yan Gao, Dong Han, Haiping Zhao, Yuhua Chen, Yumin Luo, Juan Feng, Yanxia Guo
    Frontiers in Pharmacology.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • 6th Asian PAD Workshop

    Annals of Vascular Diseases.2015; 8(2): 135.     CrossRef
  • Non-HDL cholesterol is an independent risk factor for aspirin resistance in obese patients with type 2 diabetes
    Jong Dai Kim, Cheol-Young Park, Kue Jeong Ahn, Jae Hyoung Cho, Kyung Mook Choi, Jun Goo Kang, Jae Hyeon Kim, Ki Young Lee, Byung Wan Lee, Ji Oh Mok, Min Kyong Moon, Joong Yeol Park, Sung Woo Park
    Atherosclerosis.2014; 234(1): 146.     CrossRef
Effects of Walking and Physical Activity on Glucose Regulation among Type 2 Diabetics.
Yoonsuk Jekal, Mi Kyung Lee, Eun Sung Kim, Ji Hye Park, Hyun Ji Lee, Seung Jin Han, Eun Seok Kang, Hyun Chul Lee, So Hun Kim, Justin Y Jeon
Korean Diabetes J. 2008;32(1):60-67.   Published online February 1, 2008
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2008.32.1.60
  • 2,329 View
  • 39 Download
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Physical activity, especially walking is strongly recommended to control blood glucose among type 2 diabetic patients. Furthermore, physical activity is one of the most important tools to prevent secondary diabetes complications among type 2 diabetic patients such as retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy etc. The purpose of the study was to examine the association between the level of walking and physical activity and glucose control among Korean adults with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: A total of 250 patients with type 2 diabetes (98 males and 152 females) were recruited (mean age = 62.1 +/- 10.2 years) in the current study. The height, weight, waist and hip circumference were measured, and the level of physical activity and total walking hour were measured by physical activity scale for elderly (PASE). High density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), total cholesterol, triglyceride, fasting glucose and oral glucose tolerance test, creatinine, uric acid, total protein, albumin, hemoglobin A1c were measured. RESULTS: After adjusting for potential covariates such as age, education, occupation income, smoking, and drinking, male patients who spent least time in walking were more likely to have 2 hour serum glucose level in oral glucose tolerance above 200 mg/dL than counterparts who spent most time in walking with age adjusted (Relative Risk (RR) = 11.75, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.94-71.00). Male patients who were in the least active group were 5.92 time (95% CI = 1.39-25.28) more likely to have 2 hour serum glucose level in oral glucose tolerance over 200 mg/dL than counterparts in the most active group. However, there was no significant finding in females. CONCLUSIONS: The current study showed that physical activity and walking are effective method to maintain glucose tolerance among type 2 diabetic male patients.

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  • 호남권 지역주민의 건강행태와 만성질환 관리현황
    선아 김, 정은 이
    Public Health Weekly Report.2024; 17(2): 46.     CrossRef
  • Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Obesity, Metabolic Parameters and Clinical Values in the South Korean Adult Population
    Anna Kim, Eun-yeob Kim, Jaeyoung Kim
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2024; 13(10): 2814.     CrossRef
  • A Study Analyzing the Relationship among Impaired Fasting Glucose (IFG), Obesity Index, Physical Activity, and Beverage and Alcohol Consumption Frequency in 20s and 30s:The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) 2013-2015
    Yujin Lee, Jung-Hyun Kim
    The Korean Journal of Community Living Science.2022; 33(1): 19.     CrossRef
  • Travel Guidance for People with Diabetes
    Izadi Morteza, Hosseini Mahboobeh Sadat, Pazham Hossein
    International Journal of Travel Medicine and Global Health.2015; 3(4): 149.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and Risk Factors of Type 2 Diabetes According to Gender among Korean Employees
    Sang-A Kim, Woong-Sub Park, Su Jeong Yu, Young Ran Chae, Donghee Choi
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2015; 16(11): 7589.     CrossRef
  • Low Levels of Physical Activity Are Associated with Increased Metabolic Syndrome Risk Factors in Korean Adults
    Dong Hoon Lee, Yoon Myung Kim, Yoonsuk Jekal, Sukyung Park, Kyong-Chol Kim, Masayo Naruse, Sun Hyun Kim, Sang-Hwan Kim, Ji-Hye Park, Mi Kyung Lee, Sang Hui Chu, Justin Y. Jeon
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2013; 37(2): 132.     CrossRef
  • Association between Obesity and Physical Fitness, and Hemoglobin A1c Level and Metabolic Syndrome in Korean Adults
    Yoonsuk Jekal, Mi-Kyung Lee, Sukyung Park, Seung-Hwan Lee, Jun-Young Kim, Jung-Ui Kang, Masayo Naruse, Sang-Hwan Kim, Sun-Hyeon Kim, Sang Hui Chu, Sang-Hoon Suh, Justin Y Jeon
    Korean Diabetes Journal.2010; 34(3): 182.     CrossRef
Analysis of Meal Habits from the Viewpoint of Regularity in Korean Type 2 Diabetic Patients.
Hee Jung Ahn, Kyung Ah Han, Boo Kyung Koo, Hyun Jin Kim, Hyo Jeong Kim, Kang Seo Park, Kyung Wan Min
Korean Diabetes J. 2008;32(1):68-76.   Published online February 1, 2008
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2008.32.1.68
  • 2,526 View
  • 54 Download
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
The regular meal pattern with consistent day-to-day calorie and carbohydrate intake is one of the most important determinants of good glycemic control in diabetes. This study was aimed to investigate the meal pattern and their relationships with total energy intake, nutrients intake and glycemic and lipid profile in type 2 diabetes. METHODS: 1,084 subjects were divided according to glycemic status into three groups: the diabetes (DM), dysglycemia (DG) and normal (N). The meal frequency (MF), meal interval (MI) and daily intake of total energy, macronutrient and micronutrient were estimated with the 24 hours dietary recall from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) in 2001 and Eulji hospital. For analysis of meal pattern and it's relations with the nutrients intake, we regrouped into meal skipper (G1), non-meal skipper with unreasonable MI (G2), and non-meal skipper with reasonable MI (G3). RESULTS: 17.5% of DM, 21.8% of DG, 23.3% of N skipped at least one meal a day without significant difference across the groups. 55.9% of non-meal skipper had unreasonable MI. Meal was more regular in older age, lower educated person, employee, and female. G1 took higher fat, and more calories form snack and less micronutrient density, compared with G3 (P < 0.05). HbA1c, total cholesterol and triglyceride values were higher in G1 compared with other two groups (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Many type 2 diabetics had the irregular meal patterns, which was associated with poor glycemic control, lipid profiles and less micronutrient density. This suggested that another treatment strategy might be required for those who had irregular lifestyle.

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  • Adherence to Dietary Guidelines among Diabetes Patients: Comparison between Elderly and Non-Elderly Groups
    Haeun Jang, Jihyun Im, Kyong Park
    Clinical Nutrition Research.2021; 10(1): 14.     CrossRef
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    Ji Young Ye, Sung Hee Min, Min June Lee
    Korean Journal of Food & Cookery Science.2017; 33(5): 601.     CrossRef
  • Five Year's Follow-up of the Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among the Low Level Organic Solvent Exposure Workers
    Mi-Ae Kim
    Korean Journal of Occupational Health Nursing.2015; 24(2): 67.     CrossRef
  • A Predictive Model of Health Outcomes for Young People with Type 2 Diabetes
    Sun Young Jung, Sook Ja Lee, Sun Hee Kim, Kyung Mi Jung
    Asian Nursing Research.2015; 9(1): 73.     CrossRef
  • Need for Development of a List of Meals for Diabetic Patients and Development of Barley-Based Diabetic Meals
    Ji Hye Ryu, Jeong Ok Rho
    Family and Environment Research.2013; 51(5): 551.     CrossRef
  • Comorbidity Study on Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Using Data Mining
    Hye Soon Kim, A Mi Shin, Mi Kyung Kim, Yoon Nyun Kim
    The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine.2012; 27(2): 197.     CrossRef
  • Factors that Affect Medication Adherence in Elderly Patients with Diabetes Mellitus
    Kyung-Ae Park, Jung-Guk Kim, Bo-Wan Kim, Sin Kam, Keon-Yeop Kim, Sung-Woo Ha, Sung-Taek Hyun
    Korean Diabetes Journal.2010; 34(1): 55.     CrossRef
  • Nutrients and Dish Intake by Fasting Blood Glucose Level
    Jihyun Choi, Hyun-Kyung Moon
    The Korean Journal of Nutrition.2010; 43(5): 463.     CrossRef
Factors Influencing Adherence to Preventive Behavior on Chronic Complications of Diabetes Mellitus.
Soon Gu Kim
Korean Diabetes J. 2008;32(1):77-82.   Published online February 1, 2008
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2008.32.1.77
  • 1,677 View
  • 26 Download
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
The prevalence of diabetes is steadily increasing in Korea. The increase of people with diabetes will ultimately result in taking a turn for the worse, not only affecting the health of the people, but there will be an increase of social finances. This study was aimed at investigating the factors influencing adherence to preventive behavior on chronic complications of Diabetes Mellitus. METHODS: Data was collected by questionnaires from 332 diabetic patients who were visited out-patient clinics, with 323 finally selected for the study. The data was analyzed by the SPSS program. RESULTS: The level of knowledge on chronic complications of Diabetes Mellitus was 18.02 points space(maximum 24 points). The level of hardiness was 119.80 points(maximum 240 points). The level of adherence to preventive behavior on chronic complications of Diabetes Mellitus was 49.11 points(maximum 75 points). The score of knowledge and hardiness showed a significant correlation with adherence to preventive behavior on chronic complications of Diabetes Mellitus. The significant predictors influencing adherence to preventive behavior were treatment, knowledge of Diabetes Mellitus, and hardiness. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that treatment, knowledge, and hardiness are significant influencing factors on adherence to preventive behavior on chronic complications of Diabetes Mellitus. The results of this study will contribute to developing a program for people with diabetes.

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  • Factors Related to Perceived Health Status in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes
    Ang Li Won, Seung Hyun Yoo, Myoung Soon You
    Korean Journal of Health Education and Promotion.2014; 31(3): 1.     CrossRef
  • Relationships of Motivational Factors and Diabetes Self-management Behavior in Community Dwelling Older Adults
    Kyoungsan Seo, Misoon Song
    Journal of muscle and joint health.2012; 19(3): 308.     CrossRef
Letter
The Plasma Adiponectin Levels in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes.
Hae Jin Kim
Korean Diabetes J. 2008;32(1):83-83.   Published online February 1, 2008
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2008.32.1.83
  • 1,860 View
  • 16 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
No abstract available.

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