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Epidemiology
Relationship between Biological Markers, Metabolic Components, Lifestyles, and Impaired Fasting Glucose in Male Workers
Tomoyuki Kawada
Diabetes Metab J. 2015;39(5):434-438.   Published online October 22, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2015.39.5.434
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   
Background

Confirmation regarding the association between impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and biomarkers in addition to metabolic components and lifestyle factors are required in the occupational filed for preventing diabetes mellitus.

Methods

The study was performed in working men aged 30 to 60 years old, who were not taking medication for any metabolic diseases. The author measured the serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), uric acid, and plasma fibrinogen as potential biomarkers of IFG.

Results

The mean serum uric acid, log-transformed serum CRP, and plasma fibrinogen levels were higher in the subjects with IFG than in those without IFG. Multivariate analysis revealed significant associations between the presence of IFG and age, log-transformed value of serum CRP, increased waist circumference, hypertension, and hypertriglyceridemia, with odds ratios of 1.1 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08 to 1.1; P<0.001), 1.8 (95% CI, 1.4 to 2.3; P<0.001), 1.3 (95% CI, 1.09 to 1.7; P<0.01), 1.9 (95% CI, 1.6 to 2.3; P<0.001), and 1.3 (95% CI, 1.04 to 1.6; P<0.05), respectively, for the presence of IFG.

Conclusion

Serum CRP, age, and three metabolic components were associated with IFG. In contrast, there were no significant associations between IFG and lifestyle factors, serum uric acid or plasma fibrinogen.

Original Articles
Serum Adiponectin and Type 2 Diabetes: A 6-Year Follow-Up Cohort Study
Sun Ha Jee, Chul Woo Ahn, Jong Suk Park, Chang Gyu Park, Hyon-Suk Kim, Sang-Hak Lee, Sungha Park, Myoungsook Lee, Chang Beom Lee, Hye Soon Park, Heejin Kimm, Sung Hee Choi, Jidong Sung, Seungjoon Oh, Hyojee Joung, Sung Rae Kim, Ho-Joong Youn, Sun Mi Kim, Hong Soo Lee, Yejin Mok, Eunmi Choi, Young Duk Yun, Soo-Jin Baek, Jaeseong Jo, Kap Bum Huh
Diabetes Metab J. 2013;37(4):252-261.   Published online August 14, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2013.37.4.252
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  • 40 Download
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   
Background

Studies on factors which may predict the risk of diabetes are scarce. This prospective cohort study was conducted to determine the association between adiponectin and type 2 diabetes among Korean men and women.

Methods

A total of 42,845 participants who visited one of seven health examination centers located in Seoul and Gyeonggi province, Republic of Korea between 2004 and 2008 were included in this study. The incidence rates of diabetes were determined through December 2011. To evaluate the effects of adiponectin on type 2 diabetes, the Cox proportional hazard model was used.

Results

Of the 40,005 participants, 959 developed type 2 diabetes during a 6-year follow-up. After the adjustment for age, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference, the risks for type 2 diabetes in participants with normoglycemia had a 1.70-fold (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21 to 2.38) increase in men and a 1.83-fold (95% CI, 1.17 to 2.86) increase in women with the lowest tertile of adiponectin when compared to the highest tertile of adiponectin. For participants with impaired fasting glucose (IFG), the risk for type 2 diabetes had a 1.46-fold (95% CI, 1.17 to 1.83) increase in men and a 2.52-fold (95% CI, 1.57 to 4.06) increase in women with the lowest tertile of adiponectin. Except for female participants with normoglycemia, all the risks remained significant after the adjustment for fasting glucose and other confounding variables. Surprisingly, BMI and waist circumference were not predictors of type 2 diabetes in men or women with IFG after adjustment for fasting glucose and other confounders.

Conclusion

A strong association between adiponectin and diabetes was observed. The use of adiponectin as a predictor of type 2 diabetes is considered to be useful.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Adiponectin and metabolic cardiovascular diseases: Therapeutic opportunities and challenges
    Xiaotian Lei, Sheng Qiu, Gangyi Yang, Qinan Wu
    Genes & Diseases.2023; 10(4): 1525.     CrossRef
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    Young-Sang Kim, Soo-Hyun Lee, Seung Geon Park, Bo Youn Won, Hyejin Chun, Doo-Yeoun Cho, Moon-Jong Kim, Ji Eun Lee, Ji-Hee Haam, Kunhee Han
    Metabolism.2020; 103: 154026.     CrossRef
  • Anti-inflammatory effects of sucrose-derived oligosaccharides produced by a constitutive mutant L. mesenteroides B-512FMCM dextransucrase in high fat diet-fed mice
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    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications.2016; 477(3): 350.     CrossRef
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    Hossein Darabi, Alireza Raeisi, Mohammad Reza Kalantarhormozi, Afshin Ostovar, Majid Assadi, Kamyar Asadipooya, Katayoun Vahdat, Sina Dobaradaran, Iraj Nabipour
    Medicine.2015; 94(33): e1347.     CrossRef
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    Sahar M. El-Haggar, Wael F. Farrag, Fedaa A. Kotkata
    Journal of Diabetes and its Complications.2015; 29(3): 427.     CrossRef
  • Smoking and Diabetes: Is the Association Mediated by Adiponectin, Leptin, or C-reactive Protein?
    Esayas Haregot Hilawe, Hiroshi Yatsuya, Yuanying Li, Mayu Uemura, Chaochen Wang, Chifa Chiang, Hideaki Toyoshima, Koji Tamakoshi, Yan Zhang, Nobuo Kawazoe, Atsuko Aoyama
    Journal of Epidemiology.2015; 25(2): 99.     CrossRef
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    Huasheng Lai, Nie Lin, Zhenzhen Xing, Huanhuan Weng, Hua Zhang
    Journal of Diabetes Investigation.2015; 6(4): 416.     CrossRef
  • Adiponectin as a Biomarker of Osteoporosis in Postmenopausal Women: Controversies
    Anna Lubkowska, Aleksandra Dobek, Jan Mieszkowski, Wojciech Garczynski, Dariusz Chlubek
    Disease Markers.2014; 2014: 1.     CrossRef
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    Soo Lim, Michael J. Quon, Kwang Kon Koh
    Atherosclerosis.2014; 233(2): 721.     CrossRef
Increasing Prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes in a Rural Bangladeshi Population: A Population Based Study for 10 Years
Bishwajit Bhowmik, Faria Afsana, Lien My Diep, Sanjida Binte Munir, Erica Wright, Sharif Mahmood, A. K. Azad Khan, Akhtar Hussain
Diabetes Metab J. 2013;37(1):46-53.   Published online February 15, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2013.37.1.46
  • 5,058 View
  • 39 Download
  • 27 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   
Background

To observe changes in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and its associated risk factors in a rural Bangladeshi population over a 10-year period.

Methods

Three cross-sectional studies were undertaken in a rural community (aged ≥20 years) in 1999, 2004, and 2009. Structured questionnaires including sociodemographic parameters, anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, and blood glucose values were recorded. DM and IFG were diagnosed using 1999 World Health Organization criteria.

Results

Age standardized prevalence of DM increased significantly (P<0.001) from 1999 to 2009 (2.3%, 6.8%, and 7.9% in 1999, 2004, and 2009, respectively). The prevalence of IFG increased significantly (P=0.011) from 4.6% to 5.8% between 1999 and 2004 but then decreased from 5.8% to 5.3% during 2004 to 2009. Significant linear trends were shown in both sexes for general and central obesity as indicated by body mass index, waist circumference, and waist hip ratio (WHR). Increasing age and systolic blood pressure were significant risk factors for DM in all three studies. WHR for males was also significantly associated with the risk of DM in all three studies. WHR for females was only significantly associated with DM in 2009.

Conclusion

A significant rise in the prevalence of DM was observed in this population over 10 years. This increase was seen in both sexes, and in all age groups. A significant increase in the prevalence of the associated risk factors of general and central obesity was observed in both sexes.

Citations

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  • Depression and health-related quality of life of patients with type 2 diabetes attending tertiary level hospitals in Dhaka, Bangladesh
    Manish K. Namdeo, Sarita Verma, Rajat Das Gupta, Rubana Islam, Shaila Nazneen, Lal B. Rawal
    Global Health Research and Policy.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A quantile regression approach to identify risk factors for high blood glucose levels among Bangladeshi individuals
    Mst. Farjana Aktar, Mashfiqul Huq Chowdhury, Md. Siddikur Rahman
    Health Science Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of anthropometric indices with cardiometabolic risk factors in adult Bangladeshi population
    Farah-Sul Lail, Shamima Afrin, Md Mozammel Haque
    Obesity Medicine.2022; 34: 100444.     CrossRef
  • Diabetes among adults in Bangladesh: changes in prevalence and risk factors between two cross-sectional surveys
    Muhammad Abdul Baker Chowdhury, Mirajul Islam, Jakia Rahman, Md Jamal Uddin, Md. Rabiul Haque
    BMJ Open.2022; 12(8): e055044.     CrossRef
  • Community groups or mobile phone messaging to prevent and control type 2 diabetes and intermediate hyperglycaemia in Bangladesh (DMagic): a cluster-randomised controlled trial
    Edward Fottrell, Naveed Ahmed, Joanna Morrison, Abdul Kuddus, Sanjit Kumer Shaha, Carina King, Hannah Jennings, Kohenour Akter, Tasmin Nahar, Hassan Haghparast-Bidgoli, A K Azad Khan, Anthony Costello, Kishwar Azad
    The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.2019; 7(3): 200.     CrossRef
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    Ambepitiyawaduge Pubudu De Silva, Sudirikku Hennadige Padmal De Silva, Rashan Haniffa, Isurujith Kongala Liyanage, Saroj Jayasinghe, Prasad Katulanda, Chandrika Neelakanthi Wijeratne, Sumedha Wijeratne, Lalini Chandika Rajapaksa
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  • Letter: Increasing Prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes in a Rural Bangladeshi Population: A Population Based Study for 10 Years (Diabetes Metab J2013;37:46-53)
    Nan Hee Kim
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2013; 37(2): 152.     CrossRef
Prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus(Fasting Plasma Glucose by the ADA Criteria) and Impaired Fasting Glucose according to Anthropometric Characteristics and Dietary Habits: 1998 National Health and Nutrition Survey.
Chul Sik Kim, Eun Kyong Jeong, Jina Park, Min Ho Cho, Ji Sun Nam, Hai Jin Kim, Jee Hyun Kong, Jong Suk Park, Joo Young Nam, Dol Mi Kim, Chul Woo Ahn, Bong Soo Cha, Sung Kil Lim, Kyung Rae Kim, Hyun Chul Lee, Chung Mo Nam
Korean Diabetes J. 2005;29(2):151-166.   Published online March 1, 2005
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  • 18 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
The study is based on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in Korea(1998). With these data, we want to predict the prevalence of diabetes mellitus(DM) and impaired fasting glucose(IFG), By investigating anthropometric characteristics and dietary intake habits, we also wanted to analyze any significant correlation between those factors and the prevalences of DM and IFG. METHODS: The study group was comprised of 8,166 people, a representative group of Koreans, who had undergone a health check-up and food intake survey among the total 39,331 members of 12,189 families who were surveyed. RESULTS: The final results are as the follows. 1) The peak prevalence of DM was 15.92% among women in their sixties and 18.21% among men in their fifties, and that of IFG was found to be 16.27% of women in their seventies and 14.09% of men in their sixties. 2) When analyzing the eating habits and the prevalences of DM and IFG, we found that women with more glucose intake had a lesser risk of DM, but this was of no statistical significance. 3) In men, age, total cholesterol, triglyceride(TG), and hypertension(HTN) were revealed as meaningful factors and in women, age, TG, and HTN were revealed as meaningful factors. As to the IFG, in females, age and TG were meaningful factors, and in males, age, TG, the waist/hip ratio (WHR), and body mass index (BMI) were meaningful factors. CONCLUSION: Although this study could not demonstrate meaningful correlation between diet habits and DM, the prevalence of IFG and the recent increase in the prevalence of DM in Koreans, owing to alterations in their diet habits, demands further organized group study for a better understanding of their relationship
Comparison of Clinical Characteristics of Impaired Fasting Glucose with Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Yonchon County.
In Kyong Jeong, Min Kyong Moon, Sang Wan Kim, Young Joo Park, Sun Yuk Kim, Chan Soo Shin, Do Joon Park, Kyong Soo Park, Seong Yeon Kim, Bo Youn Cho, Noe Kyeong Kim, Hong Kyu Lee
Korean Diabetes J. 2000;24(1):71-77.   Published online January 1, 2001
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  • 21 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
To compare the clinical characteristics of 1997 American Diabetes Association (ADA) impaired fasting glucose (IFG) based on fasting plasma glucose (FPG) with World Health Organization (WHO) impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) based on oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in a Korean population. METHODS: The analyses were based on the data of 2,251 subjects aged 30-80 years obtained from the surveys of Yonchon County in Korea in 1993, and the data of 1084 subjects participated in the follow-up survey in 1995. Prevalence of glucose tolerance categories was obtained by using WHO and ADA criteria, and the level of agreement was estimated by index. Cardiovascular risk profile and the incidence of diabetes based on the ADA criteria after 2 years were compared by focusing on the discordant ctiagnostic categories namely IGT/NFS in which the subjects were diagnosed as IGT by WHO criteria but normal fasting glucose(NFG) by ADA criteria and NGT/IFG diagnosed as normal glucose tolerance(NGT) by WHO but IFG by ADA. Results The ADA criteria failed to diagnose 69% of IGT patients, that is 62% of them were considered normal and 7% as diabetes. The overall agreement was poor (x statistics = 0.32, p<0.05). Subjects classified into IGT/NFG or NGT/IFG showed the worse cardiovascular risk profile and higher incidence of diabetes than NGT/NFG. Especially, subjects with NGT/IFG exhibited higher incidence of diabetes than those with IGT/NFG. CONCLUSION: Although IFG predicts subsequent development of diabetes much better than IGT, the vast majority of the subjects with IGT will be missed according to ADA criteria based on FPG only. Consequently FPG alone could be an inadequate substitute for the OGTT.

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