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14 "Gyuri Kim"
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Original Articles
Cardiovascular Risk/Epidemiology
Psychotic Disorders and the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Diseases, and All-Cause Mortality: A Population-Based Matched Cohort Study
You-Bin Lee, Hyewon Kim, Jungkuk Lee, Dongwoo Kang, Gyuri Kim, Sang-Man Jin, Jae Hyeon Kim, Hong Jin Jeon, Kyu Yeon Hur
Diabetes Metab J. 2024;48(1):122-133.   Published online January 3, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2022.0431
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
The effects of psychotic disorders on cardiometabolic diseases and premature death need to be determined in Asian populations.
Methods
In this population-based matched cohort study, the Korean National Health Insurance Service database (2002 to 2018) was used. The risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), acute myocardial infarction (AMI), ischemic stroke, composite of all cardiometabolic diseases, and all-cause death during follow-up was compared between individuals with psychotic disorders treated with antipsychotics (n=48,162) and 1:1 matched controls without psychiatric disorders among adults without cardiometabolic diseases before or within 3 months after baseline.
Results
In this cohort, 53,683 composite cases of all cardiometabolic diseases (during median 7.38 years), 899 AMI, and 1,216 ischemic stroke cases (during median 14.14 years), 7,686 T2DM cases (during median 13.26 years), and 7,092 deaths (during median 14.23 years) occurred. The risk of all outcomes was higher in subjects with psychotic disorders than matched controls (adjusted hazard ratios [95% confidence intervals]: 1.522 [1.446 to 1.602] for T2DM; 1.455 [1.251 to 1.693] for AMI; 1.568 [1.373 to 1.790] for ischemic stroke; 1.595 [1.565 to 1.626] for composite of all cardiometabolic diseases; and 2.747 [2.599 to 2.904] for all-cause mortality) during follow-up. Similar patterns of associations were maintained in subgroup analyses but more prominent in younger individuals (P for interaction <0.0001) when categorized as those aged 18–39, 40–64, or ≥65 years.
Conclusion
Patients with psychotic disorders treated with antipsychotics were associated with increased risk of premature allcause mortality and cardiometabolic outcomes in an Asian population. This relationship was more pronounced in younger individuals, especially aged 18 to 39 years.
Complications
Risk of Depression according to Cumulative Exposure to a Low-Household Income Status in Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Nationwide Population- Based Study
So Hee Park, You-Bin Lee, Kyu-na Lee, Bongsung Kim, So Hyun Cho, So Yoon Kwon, Jiyun Park, Gyuri Kim, Sang-Man Jin, Kyu Yeon Hur, Kyungdo Han, Jae Hyeon Kim
Diabetes Metab J. 2024;48(2):290-301.   Published online January 3, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2022.0299
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
We aimed to identify the risk of incident depression according to cumulative exposure to a low-household income status in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).
Methods
For this retrospective longitudinal population-based cohort study, we used Korean National Health Insurance Service data from 2002 to 2018. Risk of depression was assessed according to cumulative exposure to low-household income status (defined as Medical Aid registration) during the previous 5 years among adults (aged ≥20 years) with T2DM and without baseline depression who underwent health examinations from 2009 to 2012 (n=2,027,317).
Results
During an average 6.23 years of follow-up, 401,175 incident depression cases occurred. Advance in cumulative number of years registered for medical aid during the previous 5 years from baseline was associated with an increased risk of depression in a dose-dependent manner (hazard ratio [HR], 1.44 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.38 to 1.50]; HR, 1.40 [95% CI, 1.35 to 1.46]; HR, 1.42, [95% CI, 1.37 to 1.48]; HR, 1.46, [95% CI, 1.40 to 1.53]; HR, 1.69, [95% CI, 1.63 to 1.74] in groups with 1 to 5 exposed years, respectively). Insulin users exposed for 5 years to a low-household income state had the highest risk of depression among groups categorized by insulin use and duration of low-household income status.
Conclusion
Cumulative duration of low-household income status, defined as medical aid registration, was associated with an increased risk of depression in a dose-response manner in individuals with T2DM.
Metabolic Risk/Epidemiology
Low Household Income Status and Death from Pneumonia in People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Nationwide Study
You-Bin Lee, So Hee Park, Kyu-na Lee, Bongsung Kim, So Yoon Kwon, Jiyun Park, Gyuri Kim, Sang-Man Jin, Kyu Yeon Hur, Kyungdo Han, Jae Hyeon Kim
Diabetes Metab J. 2023;47(5):682-692.   Published online June 22, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2022.0184
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
We explored the risk of death from pneumonia according to cumulative duration in low household income state (LHIS) among adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).
Methods
Using Korean National Health Insurance Service data (2002 to 2018), the hazards of mortality from pneumonia were analyzed according to duration in LHIS (being registered to Medical Aid) during the 5 years before baseline (0, 1–4, and 5 years) among adults with T2DM who underwent health examinations between 2009 and 2012 (n=2,503,581). Hazards of outcomes were also compared in six groups categorized by insulin use and duration in LHIS.
Results
During a median 7.18 years, 12,245 deaths from pneumonia occurred. Individuals who had been exposed to LHIS had higher hazards of death from pneumonia in a dose-response manner (hazard ratio [HR], 1.726; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.568 to 1.899 and HR, 4.686; 95% CI, 3.948 to 5.562 in those exposed for 1–4 and 5 years, respectively) compared to the non-exposed reference. Insulin users exposed for 5 years to LHIS exhibited the highest outcome hazard among six groups categorized by insulin use and duration in LHIS.
Conclusion
Among adults with T2DM, cumulative duration in LHIS may predict increased risks of mortality from pneumonia in a graded dose-response manner. Insulin users with the longest duration in LHIS might be the group most vulnerable to death from pneumonia among adults with T2DM.
Guideline/Fact Sheet
Insulin Fact Sheet in Type 1 and 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Trends of Antidiabetic Medication Use in Insulin Users with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: 2002 to 2019
Jiyun Park, Gyuri Kim, Bong-Sung Kim, Kyung-Do Han, So Yoon Kwon, So Hee Park, You-Bin Lee, Sang-Man Jin, Jae Hyeon Kim
Diabetes Metab J. 2023;47(2):211-219.   Published online February 7, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2022.0346
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
This study investigated the trends of insulin use among Korean patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Changes in prescription of antidiabetic medications in T2DM patients taking insulin therapy were evaluated.
Methods
We analyzed data from the National Health Insurance Service database in Korea to evaluate the prevalence of insulin users and trends of insulin use in T1DM and T2DM patients from January 2002 to December 2019. We also investigated numbers and types of antidiabetic medications in insulin users with T2DM.
Results
The overall total number of insulin users increased from 2002 to 2019, reaching 348,254 for T2DM and 20,287 for T1DM in 2019 compared with 109,974 for T2DM and 34,972 for T1DM in 2002. The proportion of patients using basal analogs and short acting analogs have increased and those using human insulin, premixed insulin, or biphasic human insulin have decreased (rapid acting analogs: 71.85% and 24.12% in T1DM and T2DM, respectively, in 2019; basal analogs: 76.75% and 75.09% in T1DM and T2DM, respectively, in 2019). The use of other antidiabetic medication in addition to insulin increased for T2DM, especially in dual therapy, reaching up to 52.35% in 2019 compared with 16.72% in 2002.
Conclusion
The proportion of the patients using basal or rapid acting analogs increased among all insulin users in both T1DM and T2DM patients. Among patients with T2DM, the proportion of patients using antidiabetic medications in addition to insulin was significantly increased compared to those who used insulin alone.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Real-World Continuous Glucose Monitoring Data from a Population with Type 1 Diabetes in South Korea: Nationwide Single-System Analysis
    Ji Yoon Kim, Sang-Man Jin, Sarah B. Andrade, Boyang Chen, Jae Hyeon Kim
    Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Continuous glucose monitoring for glycaemic control and cardiovascular risk reduction in patients with type 2 diabetes not on insulin therapy: A clinical trial
    Joseph Reed, Tony Dong, Elke Eaton, Janice Friswold, Jodie Porges, Sadeer G. Al‐Kindi, Sanjay Rajagopalan, Ian J. Neeland
    Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of pharmacokinetic interactions between lobeglitazone, empagliflozin, and metformin in healthy subjects
    Heeyoung Kim, Choon Ok Kim, Hyeonsoo Park, Min Soo Park, Dasohm Kim, Taegon Hong, Yesong Shin, Byung Hak Jin
    Translational and Clinical Pharmacology.2023; 31(1): 59.     CrossRef
  • Smart Insulin Pen: Managing Insulin Therapy for People with Diabetes in the Digital Era
    Jee Hee Yoo, Jae Hyeon Kim
    The Journal of Korean Diabetes.2023; 24(4): 190.     CrossRef
Letter
Association between Metabolic Syndrome and Microvascular Complications in Chinese Adults with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (Diabetes Metab J 2022;46:93-103)
Gyuri Kim
Diabetes Metab J. 2022;46(3):512-514.   Published online May 25, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2022.0134
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Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) Analysis of Lipids, Proteins, DNA Oxidative Damage, and Antioxidant Defense in Plasma and Erythrocytes of Young Reproductive-Age Men with Early Stages of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) Nephropathy in the Irkutsk Reg
    Marina Darenskaya, Elena Chugunova, Sergey Kolesnikov, Natalya Semenova, Isay Michalevich, Olga Nikitina, Anastasya Lesnaya, Lyubov Kolesnikova
    Metabolites.2022; 12(12): 1282.     CrossRef
  • Recent advances and potentiality of postbiotics in the food industry: Composition, inactivation methods, current applications in metabolic syndrome, and future trends
    Yujie Zhong, Tao Wang, Ruilin Luo, Jiayu Liu, Ruyi Jin, Xiaoli Peng
    Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
Short Communication
Technology/Device
A 4-Week, Two-Center, Open-Label, Single-Arm Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of EOPatch in Well-Controlled Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Jiyun Park, Nammi Park, Sangjin Han, You-Bin Lee, Gyuri Kim, Sang-Man Jin, Woo Je Lee, Jae Hyeon Kim
Diabetes Metab J. 2022;46(6):941-947.   Published online March 8, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2021.0299
  • 5,319 View
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  • 3 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
This study evaluated the safety and efficacy of tubeless patch pump called EOPatch in patients with well-controlled type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). This 4-week, two-center, open-label, single-arm study enrolled 10 adult patients diagnosed with T1DM with glycosylated hemoglobin less than 7.5%. The co-primary end points were patch pump usage time for one attachment and number of serious adverse events related to the patch pump. The secondary end points were total amount of insulin injected per patch and changes in glycemic parameters including continuous glucose monitoring data compared to those at study entry. The median usage time per patch was 84.00 hours (interquartile range, 64.50 to 92.50). Serious adverse events did not occur during the trial. Four weeks later, time in range 70 to 180 mg/dL was significantly improved (70.71%±17.14 % vs. 82.96%±9.14%, P=0.01). The times spent below range (<54 mg/dL) and above range (>180 mg/dL) also improved (All P<0.05). Four-week treatment with a tubeless patch pump was safe and led to clinical improvement in glycemic control.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Multilayer track‐etched membrane‐based electroosmotic pump for drug delivery
    Qian Yang, Zebo Zhang, Junshu Lin, Boyu Zhu, Rongying Yu, Xinru Li, Bin Su, Bo Zhao
    ELECTROPHORESIS.2024; 45(5-6): 433.     CrossRef
  • Comparison between a tubeless, on-body automated insulin delivery system and a tubeless, on-body sensor-augmented pump in type 1 diabetes: a multicentre randomised controlled trial
    Ji Yoon Kim, Sang-Man Jin, Eun Seok Kang, Soo Heon Kwak, Yeoree Yang, Jee Hee Yoo, Jae Hyun Bae, Jun Sung Moon, Chang Hee Jung, Ji Cheol Bae, Sunghwan Suh, Sun Joon Moon, Sun Ok Song, Suk Chon, Jae Hyeon Kim
    Diabetologia.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A true continuous healthcare system for type 1 diabetes
    Jiyong Kim, Salman Khan, Eun Kyu Kim, Hye-Jun Kil, Bo Min Kang, Hyo Geon Lee, Jin-Woo Park, Jun Young Yoon, Woochul Kim
    Nano Energy.2023; 113: 108553.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Technology/Device
Do-It-Yourself Open Artificial Pancreas System in Children and Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Real-World Data
Min Sun Choi, Seunghyun Lee, Jiwon Kim, Gyuri Kim, Sung Min Park, Jae Hyeon Kim
Diabetes Metab J. 2022;46(1):154-159.   Published online November 23, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2021.0011
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  • 5 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Few studies have been conducted among Asian children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) using do-it-yourself artificial pancreas system (DIY-APS). We evaluated real-world data of pediatric T1DM patients using DIY-APS. Data were obtained for 10 patients using a DIY-APS with algorithms. We collected sensor glucose and insulin delivery data from each participant for a period of 4 weeks. Average glycosylated hemoglobin was 6.2%±0.3%. The mean percentage of time that glucose level remained in the target range of 70 to 180 mg/dL was 82.4%±7.8%. Other parameters including time above range, time below range and mean glucose were also within the recommended level, similar to previous commercial and DIY-APS studies. However, despite meeting the target range, unadjusted gaps were still observed between the median basal setting and temporary basal insulin, which should be handled by healthcare providers.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Advances in Continuous Glucose Monitoring and Integrated Devices for Management of Diabetes with Insulin-Based Therapy: Improvement in Glycemic Control
    Jee Hee Yoo, Jae Hyeon Kim
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2023; 47(1): 27.     CrossRef
  • Open-source automated insulin delivery systems (OS-AIDs) in a pediatric population with type 1 diabetes in a real-life setting: the AWeSoMe study group experience
    Judith Nir, Marianna Rachmiel, Abigail Fraser, Yael Lebenthal, Avivit Brener, Orit Pinhas-Hamiel, Alon Haim, Eve Stern, Noa Levek, Tal Ben-Ari, Zohar Landau
    Endocrine.2023; 81(2): 262.     CrossRef
  • Efficacy and safety of Android artificial pancreas system use at home among adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus in China: protocol of a 26-week, free-living, randomised, open-label, two-arm, two-phase, crossover trial
    Mengyun Lei, Beisi Lin, Ping Ling, Zhigu Liu, Daizhi Yang, Hongrong Deng, Xubin Yang, Jing Lv, Wen Xu, Jinhua Yan
    BMJ Open.2023; 13(8): e073263.     CrossRef
  • Barriers to Uptake of Open-Source Automated Insulin Delivery Systems: Analysis of Socioeconomic Factors and Perceived Challenges of Caregivers of Children and Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes From the OPEN Survey
    Antonia Huhndt, Yanbing Chen, Shane O’Donnell, Drew Cooper, Hanne Ballhausen, Katarzyna A. Gajewska, Timothée Froment, Mandy Wäldchen, Dana M. Lewis, Klemens Raile, Timothy C. Skinner, Katarina Braune
    Frontiers in Clinical Diabetes and Healthcare.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Toward Personalized Hemoglobin A1c Estimation for Type 2 Diabetes
    Namho Kim, Da Young Lee, Wonju Seo, Nan Hee Kim, Sung-Min Park
    IEEE Sensors Journal.2022; 22(23): 23023.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Cardiovascular Risk/Epidemiology
Mean and Variability of Lipid Measurements and Risk for Development of Subclinical Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction
Jiyun Park, Mira Kang, Jiyeon Ahn, Min Young Kim, Min Sun Choi, You-Bin Lee, Gyuri Kim, Kyu Yeon Hur, Jae Hyeon Kim, Jeong Hoon Yang, Sang-Man Jin
Diabetes Metab J. 2022;46(2):286-296.   Published online November 22, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2021.0080
  • 5,745 View
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Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Subclinical left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (LVDD) is an emerging consequence of increased insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia is one of the few correctable risk factors of LVDD. This study evaluated the role of mean and visit-to-visit variability of lipid measurements in risk of LVDD in a healthy population.
Methods
This was a 3.7-year (interquartile range, 2.1 to 4.9) longitudinal cohort study including 2,817 adults (median age 55 years) with left ventricular ejection fraction >50% who underwent an annual or biannual health screening between January 2008 and July 2016. The mean, standard deviation (SD), coefficient of variation (CV), variability independent of the mean (VIM), and average real variability of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), apolipoprotein B (apoB), non-HDL-C, and triglycerides were obtained from three to six measurements during the 5 years preceding the first echocardiogram.
Results
Among the 2,817 patients, 560 (19.9%) developed LVDD. The mean of no component of lipid measurements was associated with risk of LVDD. CV (hazard ratio [HR], 1.35; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10 to 1.67), SD (HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.57), and VIM (HR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.55) of LDL-C and all the variability parameters of apoB were significantly associated with development of LVDD. The association between CV-LDL and risk of LVDD did not have significant interaction with sex, increasing/decreasing trend at baseline, or use of stain and/or lipid-modifying agents.
Conclusion
The variability of LDL-C and apoB, rather than their mean, was associated with risk for LVDD.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Separate and Joint Associations of Remnant Cholesterol Accumulation and Variability With Carotid Atherosclerosis: A Prospective Cohort Study
    Jinqi Wang, Rui Jin, Xiaohan Jin, Zhiyuan Wu, Haiping Zhang, Ze Han, Zongkai Xu, Yueruijing Liu, Xiaoyu Zhao, Xiuhua Guo, Lixin Tao
    Journal of the American Heart Association.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Variability of Metabolic Risk Factors: Causative Factor or Epiphenomenon?
    Hye Jin Yoo
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2022; 46(2): 257.     CrossRef
Complications
Association of Urinary N-Acetyl-β-D-Glucosaminidase with Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus without Nephropathy
Min Sun Choi, Ji Eun Jun, Sung Woon Park, Jee Hee Yoo, Jiyeon Ahn, Gyuri Kim, Sang-Man Jin, Kyu Yeon Hur, Moon-Kyu Lee, Jae Hyeon Kim
Diabetes Metab J. 2021;45(3):349-357.   Published online February 2, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2019.0211
  • 5,735 View
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  • 1 Web of Science
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Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Background
Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a common microvascular complication of diabetes and related to albuminuria in diabetic nephropathy (DN). Urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (uNAG) is a renal tubular injury marker which has been reported as an early marker of DN even in patients with normoalbuminuria. This study evaluated whether uNAG is associated with the presence and severity of CAN in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) without nephropathy.
Methods
This cross-sectional study comprised 247 subjects with T1DM without chronic kidney disease and albuminuria who had results for both uNAG and autonomic function tests within 3 months. The presence of CAN was assessed by age-dependent reference values for four autonomic function tests. Total CAN score was assessed as the sum of the partial points of five cardiovascular reflex tests and was used to estimatethe severity of CAN. The correlations between uNAG and heart rate variability (HRV) parameters were analyzed.
Results
The association between log-uNAG and presence of CAN was significant in a multivariate logistic regression model (adjusted odds ratio, 2.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08 to 5.28; P=0.031). Total CAN score was positively associated with loguNAG (β=0.261, P=0.026) in the multivariate linear regression model. Log-uNAG was inversely correlated with frequency-domain and time-domain indices of HRV.
Conclusion
This study verified the association of uNAG with presence and severity of CAN and changes in HRV in T1DM patients without nephropathy. The potential role of uNAG should be further assessed for high-risk patients for CAN in T1DM patients without nephropathy.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Determination of Diabetes-associated Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy Risk Factors among Insulin and Non-insulin Dependent Diabetics
    Ibrahim Abdulsada, Zain Alabdeen Obaid, Farah Almerza, Mays Alwaeli, Anmar Al-Elayawi, Taha Al-Dayyeni, Harir Al-Tuhafy
    The Journal of Medical Research.2023; 9(6): 141.     CrossRef
  • Association between carotid atherosclerosis and presence of intracranial atherosclerosis using three-dimensional high-resolution vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging in asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes
    Ji Eun Jun, You-Cheol Hwang, Kyu Jeong Ahn, Ho Yeon Chung, Geon-Ho Jahng, Soonchan Park, In-Kyung Jeong, Chang-Woo Ryu
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice.2022; 191: 110067.     CrossRef
Type 1 Diabetes
Age at Diagnosis and the Risk of Diabetic Nephropathy in Young Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Jong Ha Baek, Woo Je Lee, Byung-Wan Lee, Soo Kyoung Kim, Gyuri Kim, Sang-Man Jin, Jae Hyeon Kim
Diabetes Metab J. 2021;45(1):46-54.   Published online July 10, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2019.0134
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Background

The aim of this study was to evaluate characteristics and risk of diabetic complications according to age at diagnosis among young adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM).

Methods

A total of 255 T1DM patients aged less than 40 years were included. Patients were categorized into three groups (<20, 20 to 29, and 30 to 40 years) according to age at diagnosis. Diabetic nephropathy (DN) was defined when spot urine-albumin creatinine ratio was 300 mg/g or more and/or estimated glomerular filtration ratio (eGFR) level was 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 or less.

Results

Median age at diagnosis was 25 years and disease duration was 14 years. Individuals diagnosed with T1DM at childhood/adolescent (age <20 years) had lower stimulated C-peptide levels. They received more intensive insulin treatment with higher total daily insulin doses compared to older onset groups. The prevalence of DN was higher in the childhood/adolescent-onset group than in older onset groups (25.3% vs. 15.3% vs. 9.6%, P=0.022). The eGFR was inversely associated with disease duration whilst the degree of decrease was more prominent in the childhood/adolescent-onset group than in the later onset group (aged 30 to 40 years; P<0.001). Childhood/adolescent-onset group was independently associated with the risk of DN compared to the older onset group (aged 30 to 40 years; odds ratio, 3.47; 95% confidence interval, 1.45 to 8.33; P=0.005).

Conclusion

In individuals with childhood/adolescent-onset T1DM, the reduction in renal function is more prominent with disease duration. Early age-onset T1DM is an independent risk of DN.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Age at onset of type 1 diabetes between puberty and 30 years old is associated with increased diabetic nephropathy risk
    Yen-Bo Lin, Wayne Huey-Herng Sheu, Su-Huey Lo, Yen-Po Yeh, Chien-Ning Huang, Chii-Min Hwu, Chang-Hsun Hsieh, Horng-Yi Ou, Lee-Ming Chuang, Jung-Fu Chen, Yu-Cheng Chen, Yun-Hsing Peng, Szu-Tah Chen, Shang-Ren Hsu, Yi-Ling Hsieh, Chih-Hsun Chu, Chieg-Hsiang
    Scientific Reports.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Targeted mapping and utilization of the perihepatic surface for therapeutic beta cell replacement and retrieval in diabetic non-human primates
    David J. Leishman, Scott H. Oppler, Laura L. Hocum Stone, Timothy D. O’Brien, Sabarinathan Ramachandran, Bradley J. Willenberg, Andrew B. Adams, Bernhard J. Hering, Melanie L. Graham
    Frontiers in Transplantation.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparison between a tubeless, on-body automated insulin delivery system and a tubeless, on-body sensor-augmented pump in type 1 diabetes: a multicentre randomised controlled trial
    Ji Yoon Kim, Sang-Man Jin, Eun Seok Kang, Soo Heon Kwak, Yeoree Yang, Jee Hee Yoo, Jae Hyun Bae, Jun Sung Moon, Chang Hee Jung, Ji Cheol Bae, Sunghwan Suh, Sun Joon Moon, Sun Ok Song, Suk Chon, Jae Hyeon Kim
    Diabetologia.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Continuous glucose monitoring with structured education in adults with type 2 diabetes managed by multiple daily insulin injections: a multicentre randomised controlled trial
    Ji Yoon Kim, Sang-Man Jin, Kang Hee Sim, Bo-Yeon Kim, Jae Hyoung Cho, Jun Sung Moon, Soo Lim, Eun Seok Kang, Cheol-Young Park, Sin Gon Kim, Jae Hyeon Kim
    Diabetologia.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Immunopeptidome mining reveals a novel ERS-induced target in T1D
    Lina Wang, Shushu Yang, Gaohui Zhu, Jie Li, Gang Meng, Xiaoling Chen, Mengjun Zhang, Shufeng Wang, Xiangqian Li, Yu Pan, Yi Huang, Li Wang, Yuzhang Wu
    Cellular & Molecular Immunology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Network-based identification and prioritization of key transcriptional factors of diabetic kidney disease
    Ikhlak Ahmed, Mubarak Ziab, Sahar Da’as, Waseem Hasan, Sujitha P. Jeya, Elbay Aliyev, Sabah Nisar, Ajaz A. Bhat, Khalid Adnan Fakhro, Ammira S. Alshabeeb Akil
    Computational and Structural Biotechnology Journal.2023; 21: 716.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of diabetes distress and depression screening results of emerging adults with type 1 diabetes onset at different ages: findings from the German early-onset T1D study and the German Diabetes Study (GDS)
    Anna Stahl-Pehe, Christina Bächle, Kálmán Bódis, Oana-Patricia Zaharia, Karin Lange, Reinhard W. Holl, Michael Roden, Joachim Rosenbauer, M. Roden, H. Al-Hasani, B Belgardt, GJ. Bönhof, V Burkart, A. E. Buyken, G. Geerling, C. Herder, A. Icks, K. Jandelei
    Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Hemoperfusion and functional state of the macula after simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation
    IV Vorobyeva, EV Bulava, LK Moshetova, AV Pinchuk
    Bulletin of Russian State Medical University.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Sigesbeckia orientalis Extract Ameliorates the Experimental Diabetic Nephropathy by Downregulating the Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Signaling Pathways
    Chung-Ming Chen, Jer-Yiing Houng, Tsui-Ling Ko, Shu-Hui Juan, Hsiu-Chu Chou, Xing Li
    Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
  • Impact of low-protein diet on cardiovascular risk factors and kidney function in diabetic nephropathy: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized-controlled trials
    Mohammad Hassan Sohouli, Parvin Mirmiran, Shaikh Sanjid Seraj, Emad Kutbi, Hadil Ali Mohammed Alkahmous, Faisal Almuqayyid, Omar Ahnaf Arafah, Abdul Rahman Riad Barakeh, Ahmed Abu-Zaid
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice.2022; 191: 110068.     CrossRef
  • Age at Diagnosis and the Risk of Diabetic Nephropathy in Young Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (Diabetes Metab J 2021;45:46-54)
    Jong Ha Baek, Jae Hyeon Kim
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Response
Response: Association between Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis and Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (Diabetes Metab J 2020;44:267–76)
Hokyou Lee, Gyuri Kim, Yong-ho Lee
Diabetes Metab J. 2020;44(3):486-487.   Published online June 29, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2020.0127
[Original]
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Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association of Metabolic Dysfunction-Associated Fatty Liver Disease With Left Ventricular Diastolic Function and Cardiac Morphology
    Dandan Peng, Zhenqiu Yu, Mingwei Wang, Junping Shi, Lei Sun, Yuanyuan Zhang, Wenbin Zhao, Chen Chen, Jiake Tang, Chunyi Wang, Jie Ni, Wen Wen, Jingjie Jiang
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Articles
Metabolic Risk/Epidemiology
Association between Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis and Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Hokyou Lee, Gyuri Kim, Young Ju Choi, Byung Wook Huh, Byung-Wan Lee, Eun Seok Kang, Bong-Soo Cha, Eun Jig Lee, Yong-ho Lee, Kap Bum Huh
Diabetes Metab J. 2020;44(2):267-276.   Published online February 28, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2019.0001
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   
Background

Impaired diastolic heart function has been observed in persons with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and/or with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, it is unclear whether NAFLD fibrotic progression, i.e., non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, poses an independent risk for diastolic dysfunction in T2DM. We investigated the association between liver fibrosis and left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction in T2DM.

Methods

We analyzed 606 patients with T2DM, aged ≥50 years, who had undergone liver ultrasonography and pulsed-wave Doppler echocardiography. Insulin sensitivity was measured by short insulin tolerance test. Presence of NAFLD and/or advanced liver fibrosis was determined by abdominal ultrasonography and NAFLD fibrosis score (NFS). LV diastolic dysfunction was defined according to transmitral peak early to late ventricular filling (E/A) ratio and deceleration time, using echocardiography.

Results

LV diastolic dysfunction was significantly more prevalent in the NAFLD versus non-NAFLD group (59.7% vs. 49.0%, P=0.011). When NAFLD was stratified by NFS, subjects with advanced liver fibrosis exhibited a higher prevalence of diastolic dysfunction (49.0%, 50.7%, 61.8%; none, simple steatosis, advanced fibrosis, respectively; P for trend=0.003). In multivariable logistic regression, liver fibrosis was independently associated with diastolic dysfunction (odds ratio [OR], 1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07 to 2.34; P=0.022) after adjusting for insulin resistance and cardiometabolic risk factors. This association remained significant in patients without insulin resistance (OR, 4.32; 95% CI, 1.73 to 11.51; P=0.002).

Conclusions

Liver fibrosis was associated with LV diastolic dysfunction in patients with T2DM and may be an independent risk factor for diastolic dysfunction, especially in patients without systemic insulin resistance.

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  • Response: Association between Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis and Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (Diabetes Metab J 2020;44:267–76)
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Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome
Utility of Serum Albumin for Predicting Incident Metabolic Syndrome According to Hyperuricemia
You-Bin Lee, Ji Eun Jun, Seung-Eun Lee, Jiyeon Ahn, Gyuri Kim, Jae Hwan Jee, Ji Cheol Bae, Sang-Man Jin, Jae Hyeon Kim
Diabetes Metab J. 2018;42(6):529-537.   Published online September 28, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2018.0012
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   
Background

Serum albumin and uric acid have been positively linked to metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, the association of MetS incidence with the combination of uric acid and albumin levels has not been investigated. We explored the association of albumin and uric acid with the risk of incident MetS in populations divided according to the levels of these two parameters.

Methods

In this retrospective longitudinal study, 11,613 non-MetS participants were enrolled among 24,185 individuals who had undergone at least four annual check-ups between 2006 and 2012. The risk of incident MetS was analyzed according to four groups categorized by the sex-specific medians of serum albumin and uric acid.

Results

During 55,407 person-years of follow-up, 2,439 cases of MetS developed. The risk of incident MetS increased as the uric acid category advanced in individuals with lower or higher serum albumin categories with hazard ratios (HRs) of 1.386 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.236 to 1.554) or 1.314 (95% CI, 1.167 to 1.480). However, the incidence of MetS increased with higher albumin levels only in participants in the lower uric acid category with a HR of 1.143 (95% CI, 1.010 to 1.294).

Conclusion

Higher levels of albumin were associated with an increased risk of incident MetS only in individuals with lower uric acid whereas higher levels of uric acid were positively linked to risk of incident MetS regardless of albumin level.

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Epidemiology
High Proportion of Adult Cases and Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Population in Korea: A Nationwide Study
You-Bin Lee, Kyungdo Han, Bongsung Kim, Sang-Man Jin, Seung-Eun Lee, Ji Eun Jun, Jiyeon Ahn, Gyuri Kim, Jae Hyeon Kim
Diabetes Metab J. 2019;43(1):76-89.   Published online August 22, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2018.0048
  • 5,983 View
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   
Background

The prevalence and incidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in all age groups and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with T1DM in Korea were estimated.

Methods

The incidence and prevalence of T1DM between 2007 and 2013 were calculated using the Korean National Health Insurance Service (NHIS) datasets of claims. Clinical characteristics and prevalence of metabolic syndrome in individuals with T1DM between 2009 and 2013 were determined using the database of NHIS preventive health checkups.

Results

The prevalence of T1DM in Korea between 2007 and 2013 was 0.041% to 0.047%. The annual incidence rate of T1DM in Korea in 2007 to 2013 was 2.73 to 5.02/100,000 people. Although the incidence rate of typical T1DM was highest in teenagers, it remained steady in adults over 30 years of age. In contrast, the incidence rate of atypical T1DM in 2013 was higher in people aged 40 years or older than in younger age groups. Age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with T1DM was 51.65% to 55.06% between 2009 and 2013.

Conclusion

T1DM may be more common in Korean adults than previously believed. Metabolic syndrome may be a frequent finding in individuals with T1DM in Korea.

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    Cardiovascular Diabetology.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Management of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Adults
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    The Journal of Korean Diabetes.2020; 21(3): 156.     CrossRef
  • New Insulin Pumps and Open Source Artificial Pancreas System in Korea
    Jae Hyeon Kim
    The Journal of Korean Diabetes.2020; 21(4): 197.     CrossRef
  • Risk of early mortality and cardiovascular disease in type 1 diabetes: a comparison with type 2 diabetes, a nationwide study
    You-Bin Lee, Kyungdo Han, Bongsung Kim, Seung-Eun Lee, Ji Eun Jun, Jiyeon Ahn, Gyuri Kim, Sang-Man Jin, Jae Hyeon Kim
    Cardiovascular Diabetology.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Risk of end‐stage renal disease from chronic kidney disease defined by decreased glomerular filtration rate in type 1 diabetes: A comparison with type 2 diabetes and the effect of metabolic syndrome
    You‐Bin Lee, Kyungdo Han, Bongsung Kim, Ji Eun Jun, Seung‐Eun Lee, Jiyeon Ahn, Gyuri Kim, Sang‐Man Jin, Jae Hyeon Kim
    Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef

Diabetes Metab J : Diabetes & Metabolism Journal