Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

Diabetes Metab J : Diabetes & Metabolism Journal

Search
OPEN ACCESS

Previous issues

Page Path
HOME > Browse > Previous issues
17 Previous issues
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Authors
Funded articles
Volume 46(5); September 2022
Prev issue Next issue
Review
Pathophysiology
Article image
Blood Pressure Target in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Hyun-Jin Kim, Kwang-il Kim, on Behalf of the Policy Committee of Korean Society of Hypertension
Diabetes Metab J. 2022;46(5):667-674.   Published online September 19, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2022.0215
  • 6,854 View
  • 519 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
The prevalence of diabetes mellitus continues to increase worldwide, and it is a well-established cardiovascular risk factor. Hypertension is also an important cardiovascular risk factor to be controlled and is common among patients with diabetes mellitus. Optimal blood pressure (BP) goals have been the subject of great debate in the management of hypertension among patients with diabetes mellitus. This review provides detailed results from randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses of clinical outcomes according to the target BP in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. In addition, the target BP in patients with diabetes mellitus recommended by different guidelines was summarized and presented. A target BP of <140/90 mm Hg is recommended for patients with hypertension and diabetes mellitus, and BP should be controlled to <130/80 mm Hg in patients with diabetes mellitus who have high-risk clinical features. We hope that this review will be helpful to clinicians and patients by promoting the understanding and appropriate application of BP control in the comprehensive management of patients with diabetes mellitus.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Recent evidence on target blood pressure in patients with hypertension
    Hack-Lyoung Kim
    Cardiovascular Prevention and Pharmacotherapy.2024; 6(1): 17.     CrossRef
  • Using Generative AI to Improve the Performance and Interpretability of Rule-Based Diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
    Leon Kopitar, Iztok Fister, Gregor Stiglic
    Information.2024; 15(3): 162.     CrossRef
  • Additive interaction of family medical history of diabetes with hypertension on the diagnosis of diabetes among older adults in India: longitudinal ageing study in India
    Waquar Ahmed
    BMC Public Health.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Emerging roles of interferon-stimulated gene-15 in age-related telomere attrition, the DNA damage response, and cardiovascular disease
    María González-Amor, Beatriz Dorado, Vicente Andrés
    Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effects of Diabetes and Voluntary Exercise on IgA Concentration and Polymeric Immunoglobulin Receptor Expression in the Submandibular Gland of Rats
    Jaebum Park, Yuko Yamamoto, Kouki Hidaka, Satoko Wada-Takahashi, Shun-suke Takahashi, Toshiya Morozumi, Nobuhisa Kubota, Makiko Saita, Juri Saruta, Wakako Sakaguchi, Masahiro To, Tomoko Shimizu, Yuko Mikuni-Takagaki, Keiichi Tsukinoki
    Medicina.2023; 59(4): 789.     CrossRef
  • A diabetes update
    Zachary Bloomgarden
    Journal of Diabetes.2023; 15(7): 542.     CrossRef
  • CARDIOPROTECTIVE AND METABOLIC EFFECTS OF ANTIHYPERTENSIVE THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH SUCH COMORBIDITIES AS ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION, TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS, AND OBESITY
    I. P. Dunaieva, N. O. Kravchun, І. A. Ilchenko
    Bulletin of Problems Biology and Medicine.2023; 1(2): 211.     CrossRef
  • Hypertensive Heart Failure
    Filippos Triposkiadis, Pantelis Sarafidis, Alexandros Briasoulis, Dimitrios E. Magouliotis, Thanos Athanasiou, John Skoularigis, Andrew Xanthopoulos
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(15): 5090.     CrossRef
  • 2023 Clinical Practice Guidelines for Diabetes
    Min Kyong Moon
    The Journal of Korean Diabetes.2023; 24(3): 120.     CrossRef
Editorial
Asymptomatic Hypoglycemia after Metabolic Surgery: New Insights from Perioperative Continuous Glucose Monitoring
Sang-Man Jin
Diabetes Metab J. 2022;46(5):675-676.   Published online September 19, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2022.0307
  • 2,122 View
  • 174 Download
PDFPubReader   ePub   
Original Articles
Basic Research
Differentiation of Microencapsulated Neonatal Porcine Pancreatic Cell Clusters in Vitro Improves Transplant Efficacy in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Mice
Gyeong-Jin Cheon, Heon-Seok Park, Eun-Young Lee, Min Jung Kim, Young-Hye You, Marie Rhee, Ji-Won Kim, Kun-Ho Yoon
Diabetes Metab J. 2022;46(5):677-688.   Published online February 7, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2021.0202
  • 4,823 View
  • 253 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Neonatal porcine pancreatic cell clusters (NPCCs) have been proposed as an alternative source of β cells for islet transplantation because of their low cost and growth potential after transplantation. However, the delayed glucose lowering effect due to the immaturity of NPCCs and immunologic rejection remain as a barrier to NPCC’s clinical application. Here, we demonstrate accelerated differentiation and immune-tolerant NPCCs by in vitro chemical treatment and microencapsulation.
Methods
NPCCs isolated from 3-day-old piglets were cultured in F-10 media and then microencapsulated with alginate on day 5. Differentiation of NPCCs is facilitated by media supplemented with activin receptor-like kinase 5 inhibitor II, triiodothyronine and exendin-4 for 2 weeks. Marginal number of microencapsulated NPCCs to cure diabetes with and without differentiation were transplanted into diabetic mice and observed for 8 weeks.
Results
The proportion of insulin-positive cells and insulin mRNA levels of NPCCs were significantly increased in vitro in the differentiated group compared with the undifferentiated group. Blood glucose levels decreased eventually after transplantation of microencapsulated NPCCs in diabetic mice and normalized after 7 weeks in the differentiated group. In addition, the differentiated group showed nearly normal glucose tolerance at 8 weeks after transplantation. In contrast, neither blood glucose levels nor glucose tolerance were improved in the undifferentiated group. Retrieved graft in the differentiated group showed greater insulin response to high glucose compared with the undifferentiated group.
Conclusion
in vitro differentiation of microencapsulated immature NPCCs increased the proportion of insulin-positive cells and improved transplant efficacy in diabetic mice without immune rejection.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Dual-targeted nano-encapsulation of neonatal porcine islet-like cell clusters with triiodothyronine-loaded bifunctional polymersomes
    Sang Hoon Lee, Minse Kim, Eun-Jin Lee, Sun Mi Ahn, Yu-Rim Ahn, Jaewon Choi, Jung-Taek Kang, Hyun-Ouk Kim
    Discover Nano.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Long‐term efficacy of encapsulated xenogeneic islet transplantation: Impact of encapsulation techniques and donor genetic traits
    Heon‐Seok Park, Eun Young Lee, Young‐Hye You, Marie Rhee, Jong‐Min Kim, Seong‐Soo Hwang, Poong‐Yeon Lee
    Journal of Diabetes Investigation.2024; 15(6): 693.     CrossRef
Drug/Regimen
Comparison of Efficacy of Glimepiride, Alogliptin, and Alogliptin-Pioglitazone as the Initial Periods of Therapy in Patients with Poorly Controlled Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: An Open-Label, Multicenter, Randomized, Controlled Study
Hae Jin Kim, In Kyung Jeong, Kyu Yeon Hur, Soo-Kyung Kim, Jung Hyun Noh, Sung Wan Chun, Eun Seok Kang, Eun-Jung Rhee, Sung Hee Choi
Diabetes Metab J. 2022;46(5):689-700.   Published online March 17, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2021.0183
  • 6,056 View
  • 380 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
The choice of an optimal oral hypoglycemic agent in the initial treatment periods for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients remains difficult and deliberate. We compared the efficacy and safety of glimepiride (GLIM), alogliptin (ALO), and alogliptin-pioglitazone (ALO-PIO) in poorly controlled T2DM patients with drug-naïve or metformin failure.
Methods
In this three-arm, multicenter, open-label, randomized, controlled trial, poorly controlled T2DM patients were randomized to receive GLIM (n=35), ALO (n=31), or ALO-PIO (n=33) therapy for 24 weeks. The primary endpoint was change in the mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels at week 24 from baseline. Secondary endpoints were changes in HbA1c level at week 12 from baseline, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels, lipid profiles at weeks 12 and 24, and parameters of glycemic variability, assessed by continuous glucose monitoring for 24 weeks.
Results
At weeks 12 and 24, the ALO-PIO group showed significant reduction in HbA1c levels compared to the ALO group (–0.96%±0.17% vs. –0.37%±0.17% at week 12; –1.13%±0.19% vs. –0.18%±0.2% at week 24). The ALO-PIO therapy caused greater reduction in FPG levels and significant increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels at weeks 12 and 24 than the ALO therapy. Compared to low-dose GLIM therapy, ALO-PIO therapy showed greater improvement in glycemic variability. The adverse events were similar among the three arms.
Conclusion
ALO-PIO combination therapy during the early period exerts better glycemic control than ALO monotherapy and excellency in glycemic variability than low-dose sulfonylurea therapy in uncontrolled, drug-naïve or metformin failed T2DM patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Comprehensive Review on Weight Loss Associated with Anti-Diabetic Medications
    Fatma Haddad, Ghadeer Dokmak, Maryam Bader, Rafik Karaman
    Life.2023; 13(4): 1012.     CrossRef
  • Role of Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4 Inhibitors in Antidiabetic Treatment
    Ruili Yin, Yongsong Xu, Xin Wang, Longyan Yang, Dong Zhao
    Molecules.2022; 27(10): 3055.     CrossRef
Drug/Regimen
Article image
Real-World Prescription Patterns and Barriers Related to the Use of Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors among Korean Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Cardiovascular Disease
Jong Ha Baek, Ye Seul Yang, Seung-Hyun Ko, Kyung Do Han, Jae Hyeon Kim, Min Kyong Moon, Jong Suk Park, Byung-Wan Lee, Tae Jung Oh, Suk Chon, Jong Han Choi, Kyu Yeon Hur, Committee of Clinical Practice Guidelines, Korean Diabetes Association
Diabetes Metab J. 2022;46(5):701-712.   Published online June 3, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2022.0002
  • 5,276 View
  • 322 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
To evaluate prescription trends and clinical factors of the sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2i) use according to the presence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) or heart failure (HF) in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).
Methods
Prescription patterns of SGLT2i use between 2015 and 2019 were determined using the Korean National Health Insurance Service database of claims.
Results
Of all patients with T2DM (n=4,736,493), the annual prescription rate of SGLT2i increased every year in patients with ASCVD (from 2.2% to 10.7%) or HF (from 2.0% to 11.1%). After the first hospitalization for ASCVD (n=518,572), 13.7% (n=71,259) of patients initiated SGLT2i with a median of 10.6 months. After hospitalization for HF (n=372,853), 11.2% (n=41,717) of patients initiated SGLT2i after a median of 8.8 months. In multivariate regression for hospitalization, older age (per 10 years, odds ratio [OR], 0.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.56 to 0.57), lower household income (OR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.92 to 0.95), rural residents (OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.93 to 0.97), and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor (DPP-4i) users (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.81 to 0.84) were associated with lesser initiation of SGLT2i in ASCVD. Additionally, female gender (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.95 to 0.99) was associated with lesser initiation of SGLT2i in HF.
Conclusion
The prescription rate of SGLT2i increased gradually up to 2019 but was suboptimal in patients with ASCVD or HF. After the first hospitalization for ASCVD or HF, older age, female gender, low household income, rural residents, and DPP-4i users were less likely to initiate SGLT2i.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Real-World Treatment Patterns according to Clinical Practice Guidelines in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Established Cardiovascular Disease in Korea: Multicenter, Retrospective, Observational Study
    Ye Seul Yang, Nam Hoon Kim, Jong Ha Baek, Seung-Hyun Ko, Jang Won Son, Seung-Hwan Lee, Sang Youl Rhee, Soo-Kyung Kim, Tae Seo Sohn, Ji Eun Jun, In-Kyung Jeong, Chong Hwa Kim, Keeho Song, Eun-Jung Rhee, Junghyun Noh, Kyu Yeon Hur
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2024; 48(2): 279.     CrossRef
  • Hospital Readmissions for Fluid Overload among Individuals with Diabetes and Diabetic Kidney Disease: Risk Factors and Multivariable Prediction Models
    Jiashen Cai, Dorothy Huang, Hanis Binte Abdul Kadir, Zhihua Huang, Li Choo Ng, Andrew Ang, Ngiap Chuan Tan, Yong Mong Bee, Wei Yi Tay, Chieh Suai Tan, Cynthia C. Lim
    Nephron.2024; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Prescribing patterns of SGLT-2 inhibitors for patients with heart failure: A two-center analysis
    Teja Chakrala, Roshni O. Prakash, Justin Kim, Hanzhi Gao, Umar Ghaffar, Jaymin Patel, Alex Parker, Bhagwan Dass
    American Heart Journal Plus: Cardiology Research and Practice.2023; 28: 100286.     CrossRef
  • Risk of developing chronic kidney disease in young-onset Type 2 diabetes in Korea
    Joonyub Lee, Seung-Hwan Lee, Kun-Ho Yoon, Jae Hyoung Cho, Kyungdo Han, Yeoree Yang
    Scientific Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparison of SGLT2 inhibitors with DPP-4 inhibitors combined with metformin in patients with acute myocardial infarction and diabetes mellitus
    Young Sang Lyu, Seok Oh, Jin Hwa Kim, Sang Yong Kim, Myung Ho Jeong
    Cardiovascular Diabetology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness and safety of sodium–glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors in Asian populations
    Kyoung Hwa Ha, Dae Jung Kim
    Journal of Diabetes Investigation.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Severe hypoglycemia as a risk factor for cardiovascular outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes: is it preventable?
    Seung-Hyun Ko
    Cardiovascular Prevention and Pharmacotherapy.2022; 4(3): 106.     CrossRef
  • Association between the Diabetes Drug Cost and Cardiovascular Events and Death in Korea: A National Health Insurance Service Database Analysis
    Seung Min Chung, Ji-In Lee, Eugene Han, Hyun-Ae Seo, Eonju Jeon, Hye Soon Kim, Ji Sung Yoon
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2022; 37(5): 759.     CrossRef
Technology/Device
Article image
Glucose Profiles Assessed by Intermittently Scanned Continuous Glucose Monitoring System during the Perioperative Period of Metabolic Surgery
Kyuho Kim, Sung Hee Choi, Hak Chul Jang, Young Suk Park, Tae Jung Oh
Diabetes Metab J. 2022;46(5):713-721.   Published online January 24, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2021.0164
  • 5,272 View
  • 328 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) has been widely used in the management of diabetes. However, the usefulness and detailed data during perioperative status were not well studied. In this study, we described the immediate changes of glucose profiles after metabolic surgery using intermittently scanned CGM (isCGM) in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).
Methods
This was a prospective, single-center, single-arm study including 20 participants with T2DM. The isCGM (FreeStyle Libre CGM) implantation was performed within 2 weeks before surgery. We compared CGM metrics of 3 days before surgery and 3 days after surgery, and performed the correlation analyses with clinical variables.
Results
The mean glucose significantly decreased after surgery (147.0±40.4 to 95.5±17.1 mg/dL, P<0.001). Time in range (TIR; 70 to 180 mg/dL) did not significantly change after surgery in total. However, it was significantly increased in a subgroup of individuals with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) ≥8.0%. Time above range (>250 or 180 mg/dL) was significantly decreased in total. In contrast, time below range (<70 or 54 mg/dL) was significantly increased in total and especially in a subgroup of individuals with HbA1c <8.0% after surgery. The coefficient of variation significantly decreased after surgery. Higher baseline HbA1c was correlated with greater improvement in TIR (rho=0.607, P=0.005).
Conclusion
The isCGM identified improvement of mean glucose and glycemic variability, and increase of hypoglycemia after metabolic surgery, but TIR was not significantly changed after surgery. We detected an increase of TIR only in individuals with HbA1c ≥8.0%.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comparative Effect of Glucose-Lowering Drugs for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus on Stroke Prevention: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis
    Ji Soo Kim, Gyeongsil Lee, Kyung-Il Park, Seung-Won Oh
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2024; 48(2): 312.     CrossRef
  • Use of Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Patients Following Bariatric Surgery: A Scoping Review
    Yang Yu, Susan W. Groth
    Obesity Surgery.2023; 33(8): 2573.     CrossRef
  • Asymptomatic Hypoglycemia after Metabolic Surgery: New Insights from Perioperative Continuous Glucose Monitoring
    Sang-Man Jin
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2022; 46(5): 675.     CrossRef
Cardiovascular Risk/Epidemiology
Myocardial Infarction, Stroke, and All-Cause Mortality according to Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Level in the Elderly, a Nationwide Study
You-Bin Lee, Minji Koo, Eunjin Noh, Soon Young Hwang, Jung A Kim, Eun Roh, So-hyeon Hong, Kyung Mook Choi, Sei Hyun Baik, Geum Joon Cho, Hye Jin Yoo
Diabetes Metab J. 2022;46(5):722-732.   Published online March 8, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2021.0225
  • 7,425 View
  • 336 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
We assessed the myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and all-cause death risks during follow-up according to the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels among older adults.
Methods
The Korean National Health Insurance Service datasets (2002 to 2020) were used for this population-based cohort study. The hazards of MI, stroke, and all-cause mortality during follow-up were analyzed according to LDL-C level in individuals aged ≥65 years without baseline cardiovascular diseases (n=1,391,616).
Results
During a mean 7.55 years, 52,753 MIs developed; 84,224 strokes occurred over a mean 7.47 years. After a mean 8.50 years, 233,963 died. A decrease in LDL-C was associated with lower hazards of MI and stroke. The decreased hazard of stroke in lower LDL-C was more pronounced in statin users, and individuals with diabetes or obesity. The hazard of all-cause death during follow-up showed an inverted J-shaped pattern according to the LDL-C levels. However, the paradoxically increased hazard of mortality during follow-up in lower LDL-C was attenuated in statin users and individuals with diabetes, hypertension, or obesity. In statin users, lower LDL-C was associated with a decreased hazard of mortality during follow-up.
Conclusion
Among the elderly, lower LDL-C was associated with decreased risks of MI and stroke. Lower LDL-C achieved by statins in the elderly was associated with a decreased risk of all-cause death during follow-up, suggesting that LDL-C paradox for the premature death risk in the elderly should not be applied to statin users. Intensive statin therapy should not be hesitated for older adults with cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Combination of low- or moderate-intensity statin and ezetimibe vs. high-intensity statin monotherapy on primary prevention of cardiovascular disease and all-cause death: a propensity-matched nationwide cohort study
    Ji Eun Jun, In-Kyung Jeong, Kyu Jeong Ahn, Ho Yeon Chung, You-Cheol Hwang
    European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Associations of Low-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol With All-cause and Cause-specific Mortality in Older Adults in China
    Wenqing Ni, Yuebin Lv, Xueli Yuan, Yan Zhang, Hongmin Zhang, Yijing Zheng, Xiaoming Shi, Jian Xu
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The relationship of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and all-cause or cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes: a retrospective study
    Chin-Huan Chang, Shu-Tin Yeh, Seng-Wei Ooi, Chung-Yi Li, Hua-Fen Chen
    PeerJ.2023; 11: e14609.     CrossRef
  • ERCC1 polymorphism and its expression associated with ischemic stroke in Chinese population
    Xiao-Dong Deng, Jian-Lin Ke, Tai-Yu Chen, Qin Gao, Zhuo-Lin Zhao, Wei Zhang, Huan Liu, Ming-Liang Xiang, Li-Zhen Wang, Ying Ma, Yun Liu
    Frontiers in Neurology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • New, Novel Lipid-Lowering Agents for Reducing Cardiovascular Risk: Beyond Statins
    Kyuho Kim, Henry N. Ginsberg, Sung Hee Choi
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2022; 46(4): 517.     CrossRef
  • Association between the Diabetes Drug Cost and Cardiovascular Events and Death in Korea: A National Health Insurance Service Database Analysis
    Seung Min Chung, Ji-In Lee, Eugene Han, Hyun-Ae Seo, Eonju Jeon, Hye Soon Kim, Ji Sung Yoon
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2022; 37(5): 759.     CrossRef
Metabolic Risk/Epidemiology
Impact of Older Age Adiposity on Incident Diabetes: A Community-Based Cohort Study in China
Anthony Chen, Weiju Zhou, Jian Hou, Alan Nevill, Yuanlin Ding, Yuhui Wan, Rebecca Jester, Xia Qin, Zhi Hu, Ruoling Chen
Diabetes Metab J. 2022;46(5):733-746.   Published online April 29, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2021.0215
  • 4,299 View
  • 198 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Obesity classifications vary globally and the impact of older age adiposity on incident diabetes has not been well-studied.
Methods
We examined a random sample of 2,809 participants aged ≥60 years in China, who were free of diabetes at baseline and were followed up for up to 10 years to document diabetes (n=178). The incidence of diabetes was assessed in relation to different cut-off points of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) in multiple adjusted Cox regression models.
Results
The diabetic risk in the cohort increased linearly with the continuous and quartile variables of BMI and WC. The BMI-World Health Organization (WHO) and BMI-China criteria analysis did not show such a linear relationship, however, the BMI-Asian/Hong Kong criteria did; adjusted hazards ratio (HR) was 0.42 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.20 to 0.90) in BMI <20 kg/m2, 1.46 (95% CI, 0.99 to 2.14) in 23–≤26 kg/m2, and 1.63 (95% CI, 1.09 to 2.45) in ≥26 kg/m2. The WC-China criteria revealed a slightly better prediction of diabetes (adjusted HRs were 1.79 [95% CI, 1.21 to 2.66] and 1.87 [95% CI, 1.22 to 2.88] in central obese action levels 1 and 2) than the WC-WHO. The combination of the BMI-Asian/Hong Kong with WC-China demonstrated the strongest prediction. There were no gender differences in the impact of adiposity on diabetes.
Conclusion
In older Chinese, BMI-Asian/Hong Kong criteria is a better predictor of diabetes than other BMI criterion. Its combination with WC-China improved the prediction of adiposity to diabetes, which would help manage bodyweight in older age to reduce the risk of diabetes.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Investigating Gender and Age Variability in Diabetes Prediction: A Multi-Model Ensemble Learning Approach
    Rishi Jain, Nitin Kumar Tripathi, Millie Pant, Chutiporn Anutariya, Chaklam Silpasuwanchai
    IEEE Access.2024; 12: 71535.     CrossRef
  • Association of air pollution with dementia: a systematic review with meta-analysis including new cohort data from China
    Jie Tang, Anthony Chen, Fan He, Martin Shipley, Alan Nevill, Hugh Coe, Zhi Hu, Tao Zhang, Haidong Kan, Eric Brunner, Xuguang Tao, Ruoling Chen
    Environmental Research.2023; 223: 115048.     CrossRef
  • Impact of fish consumption on all-cause mortality in older people with and without dementia: a community-based cohort study
    Aishat T. Bakre, Anthony Chen, Xuguang Tao, Jian Hou, Yuyou Yao, Alain Nevill, James J. Tang, Sabine Rohrmann, Jindong Ni, Zhi Hu, John Copeland, Ruoling Chen
    European Journal of Nutrition.2022; 61(7): 3785.     CrossRef
Metabolic Risk/Epidemiology
Associations between Weight-Adjusted Waist Index and Abdominal Fat and Muscle Mass: Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis
Ji Yoon Kim, Jimi Choi, Chantal A. Vella, Michael H. Criqui, Matthew A. Allison, Nam Hoon Kim
Diabetes Metab J. 2022;46(5):747-755.   Published online March 30, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2021.0294
  • 5,959 View
  • 260 Download
  • 32 Web of Science
  • 38 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
The weight-adjusted waist index (WWI) reflected body compositional changes with aging. This study was to investigate the association of WWI with abdominal fat and muscle mass in a diverse race/ethnic population.
Methods
Computed tomography (CT) data from 1,946 participants for abdominal fat and muscle areas from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (785 Whites, 252 Asians, 406 African American, and 503 Hispanics) were used. Among them, 595 participants underwent repeated CT. The WWI was calculated as waist circumference (cm) divided by the square root of body weight (kg). The associations of WWI with abdominal fat and muscle measures were examined, and longitudinal changes in abdominal composition measures were compared.
Results
In all race/ethnic groups, WWI was positively correlated with total abdominal fat area (TFA), subcutaneous fat area, and visceral fat area, but negatively correlated with total abdominal muscle area (TMA) and abdominal muscle radiodensity (P<0.001 for all). WWI showed a linear increase with aging regardless of race and there were no significant differences in the WWI distribution between Whites, Asians, and African Americans. In longitudinal analyses, over 38.6 months of follow-up, all abdominal fat measures increased but muscle measures decreased, along with increase in WWI. The more the WWI increased, the more the TFA increased and the more the TMA decreased.
Conclusion
WWI showed positive associations with abdominal fat mass and negative associations with abdominal muscle mass, which likely reflects the abdominal compositional changes with aging in a multi-ethnic population.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The association between weight-adjusted-waist index and depression: Results from NHANES 2005–2018
    Meng Li, Xue Yu, Wenhui Zhang, Jiahui Yin, Lu Zhang, Guoshuai Luo, Yuanxiang Liu, Jiguo Yang
    Journal of Affective Disorders.2024; 347: 299.     CrossRef
  • Association between weight-adjusted-waist index and gallstones: an analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Si-Hua Wen, Xin Tang, Tao Tang, Zheng-Rong Ye
    BMC Gastroenterology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association between weight-adjusted waist index and myopia in adolescents and young adults: results from NHANES 1999–2008
    Xu Han Shi, Li Dong, Rui Heng Zhang, Wen Bin Wei
    BMC Ophthalmology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association between the weight-adjusted waist index and the odds of type 2 diabetes mellitus in United States adults: a cross-sectional study
    Dongdong Zheng, Suzhen Zhao, Dan Luo, Feng Lu, Zhishen Ruan, Xiaokang Dong, Wenjing Chen
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association between Weight-Adjusted Waist Index and depressive symptoms: A nationally representative cross-sectional study from NHANES 2005 to 2018
    Hangyu Liu, Jin Zhi, Chuzhao Zhang, Shiyi Huang, Yang Ma, Dandan Luo, Lungang Shi
    Journal of Affective Disorders.2024; 350: 49.     CrossRef
  • Relationship between cognitive function and weight-adjusted waist index in people ≥ 60 years old in NHANES 2011–2014
    Xue-li Wang, Hong-lin Feng, Xiao-zhuo Xu, Jing Liu, Xu Han
    Aging Clinical and Experimental Research.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association between weight-adjusted-waist index and periodontitis risk: A cross-sectional study
    Xinyu Wu, Zahra Cheraghi
    PLOS ONE.2024; 19(5): e0302137.     CrossRef
  • Association between weight-adjusted waist index and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a population-based study
    Changhui Yu, Shiming He, Maobin Kuang, Chao Wang, Xin Huang, Guotai Sheng, Yang Zou
    BMC Endocrine Disorders.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association between weight-adjusted waist index and serum total testosterone in males aged 6–19 years in the United States: Data from NHANES 2013–2016
    Zhifei Wu, Lingling Bao, Haiyan Wang, Jiajing Zheng, Yu Chen, Wenjuan Wang, Dongkai Qiu
    Heliyon.2024; 10(6): e27520.     CrossRef
  • Associations of weight-adjusted-waist index and depression with secondary infertility
    Fei Sun, Min Liu, Shanshan Hu, Ruijie Xie, Huijuan Chen, Zhaona Sun, Huiya Bi
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association between weight-adjusted-waist index and depression in US adults: A cross-sectional study
    Yun Shen, Yahui Wu, Panru Luo, Minghan Fu, Kai Zhu, Jinsheng Wang
    Journal of Affective Disorders.2024; 355: 299.     CrossRef
  • Age differences in the association of body mass index-defined obesity with abdominal aortic calcification
    Tangmeng Guo, Lili Huang, Zhijian Luo, Huabo Zheng, Shengshuai Shan, Bei Cheng
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The relationship between weight-adjusted-waist index and diabetic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus
    Zhaoxiang Wang, Xuejing Shao, Wei Xu, Bingshuang Xue, Shao Zhong, Qichao Yang
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Can weight-adjusted waist circumference index become a single anthropometric predictor of prostate-specific antigen concentration? A National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey analysis (2003–2010)
    Guodong Yang, Te Cui, Yu Cao, Shuowen Wang, Xinyi Yang, Mikhail Enikeev, Mingze He
    Journal of Investigative Medicine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The association between weight-adjusted-waist index and sarcopenia in adults: a population-based study
    Haojing Zhou, Hai Su, Yichen Gong, Lei Chen, Lihan Xu, Guoqian Chen, Peijian Tong
    Scientific Reports.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Assessment of existing anthropometric indices for screening sarcopenic obesity in older adults
    Jin Eui Kim, Jimi Choi, Miji Kim, Chang Won Won
    British Journal of Nutrition.2023; 129(5): 875.     CrossRef
  • Relationship Between Weight-Adjusted Waist Index and Osteoporosis in the Senile in the United States from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2017-2020
    Yuxiang Lin, Zijie Liang, Anxin Zhang, Nuo Xu, Xuewen Pei, Nanbu Wang, Liang Zheng, Danghan Xu
    Journal of Clinical Densitometry.2023; 26(2): 101361.     CrossRef
  • The association of asthma duration with body mass index and Weight-Adjusted-Waist index in a nationwide study of the U.S. adults
    Xiaoxiao Han, Xiaofang He, Gui Hao, Lifang Cao, Yinliang Qi, Kexing Han
    European Journal of Medical Research.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Relationship between weight-adjusted-waist index and erectile dysfunction in the United State: results from NHANES 2001-2004
    Shangqi Cao, Xu Hu, Yanxiang Shao, Yaohui Wang, Yaxiong Tang, Shangqing Ren, Xiang Li
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The association between weight-adjusted-waist index and total bone mineral density in adolescents: NHANES 2011–2018
    Xiaohua Wang, Shuo Yang, Gansheng He, Lin Xie
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Asthma prevalence is increased in patients with high metabolism scores for visceral fat: study reports from the US
    Qiushi Liu, Xiaoxiao Han, Yan Chen, Ying Gao, Wei Yang, Lewei Huang
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Positive association between weight-adjusted-waist index and dementia in the Chinese population with hypertension: a cross-sectional study
    Wei Zhou, Yanyou Xie, Lingling Yu, Chao Yu, Huihui Bao, Xiaoshu Cheng
    BMC Psychiatry.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Associations between weight-adjusted waist index and bone mineral density: results of a nationwide survey
    Ya Zhang, Haiyang Wu, Cheng Li, Changxiong Liu, Mingjiang Liu, Xiaozhu Liu, Qiming Yin, Xianzhe Li, Ruijie Xie
    BMC Endocrine Disorders.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of weight-adjusted-waist index with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and liver fibrosis: a cross-sectional study based on NHANES
    Qinggang Hu, Kexing Han, Jiapei Shen, Weijie Sun, Long Gao, Yufeng Gao
    European Journal of Medical Research.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Weight‐adjusted waist as an integrated index for fat, muscle and bone health in adults
    Kyoung Jin Kim, Serhim Son, Kyeong Jin Kim, Sin Gon Kim, Nam Hoon Kim
    Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle.2023; 14(5): 2196.     CrossRef
  • Association between weight-adjusted-waist index and female infertility: a population-based study
    Zujun Wen, Xiang Li
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association between weight-adjusted-waist index and risk of cardiovascular diseases in United States adults: a cross-sectional study
    Haiyang Fang, Feng Xie, Kai Li, Meng Li, Yanqing Wu
    BMC Cardiovascular Disorders.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association between the weight-adjusted waist index and stroke: a cross-sectional study
    Jiayi Ye, Yanjie Hu, Xinrong Chen, Zhe Yin, Xingzhu Yuan, Liping Huang, Ka Li
    BMC Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association between weight-adjusted-waist index and chronic kidney disease: a cross-sectional study
    Xiaowan Li, Lanyu Wang, Hongyi Zhou, Hongyang Xu
    BMC Nephrology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Sex Differences in the Association of Weight-Adjusted-Waist Index with Sarcopenic Obesity: A Cross-Sectional Study of Hemodialysis Patients
    Maolu Tian, Qin Lan, Fangfang Yu, Pinghong He, Shanshan Hu, Yan Zha
    Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders.2023; 21(10): 596.     CrossRef
  • Lean or Non-obese Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Patients: Are They Really Lean?
    Eugene Han, Yong-ho Lee
    Clinical and Molecular Hepatology.2023; 29(4): 980.     CrossRef
  • The association of body mass index and weight waist adjustment index with serum ferritin in a national study of US adults
    Hao Han, Ping Ni, Siqi Zhang, Xiaojuan Ji, Mingli Zhu, Wanyu Ma, Hongfeng Ge, Hailiang Chu
    European Journal of Medical Research.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The weight-adjusted-waist index and cognitive impairment among U.S. older adults: a population-based study
    Xiao-tong Huang, Xiang Lv, Hong Jiang
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The relationship between weight-adjusted-waist index and total bone mineral density in adults aged 20-59
    Meiqian Guo, Yi Lei, Xueqing Liu, Xiang Li, Yong Xu, Donghui Zheng
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Associations between weight-adjusted-waist index and infertility: Results from NHANES 2013 to 2020
    Huanxin Zhong, Bin Yu, Fen Zhao, Hongyin Cui, Lifang You, Dao Feng, Yi Lu
    Medicine.2023; 102(48): e36388.     CrossRef
  • The association between weight-adjusted-waist index and increased urinary albumin excretion in adults: A population-based study
    Zheng Qin, Kaixi Chang, Qinbo Yang, Qiao Yu, Ruoxi Liao, Baihai Su
    Frontiers in Nutrition.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association between the weight-adjusted-waist index and abdominal aortic calcification in United States adults: Results from the national health and nutrition examination survey 2013–2014
    Feng Xie, Yuan Xiao, Xiaozhong Li, Yanqing Wu
    Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The association between weight-adjusted-waist index and abdominal aortic calcification in adults aged ≥ 40 years: results from NHANES 2013–2014
    Zheng Qin, Dongru Du, Yupei Li, Kaixi Chang, Qinbo Yang, Zhuyun Zhang, Ruoxi Liao, Baihai Su
    Scientific Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Metabolic Risk/Epidemiology
Synergistic Interaction between Hyperuricemia and Abdominal Obesity as a Risk Factor for Metabolic Syndrome Components in Korean Population
Min Jin Lee, Ah Reum Khang, Yang Ho Kang, Mi Sook Yun, Dongwon Yi
Diabetes Metab J. 2022;46(5):756-766.   Published online January 20, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2021.0166
  • 5,272 View
  • 257 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
The present study investigated the role of synergistic interaction between hyperuricemia and abdominal obesity as a risk factor for the components of metabolic syndrome.
Methods
We performed a cross-sectional study using the data of 16,094 individuals from the seventh Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2016 to 2018). The adjusted odds ratios of metabolic syndrome and its components were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression analysis. The presence of synergistic interaction between hyperuricemia and abdominal obesity was evaluated by calculating the additive scales—the relative excess risk due to interaction, attributable proportion due to interaction, and synergy index (SI).
Results
There was a synergistic interaction between hyperuricemia and abdominal obesity in hypertriglyceridemia (men: SI, 1.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01 to 1.98; women: SI, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.02 to 2.69), and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (men: SI, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.41 to 2.91; women: SI, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.05 to 2.95). There was no significant synergistic interaction between hyperuricemia and abdominal obesity for the risk of high blood pressure (men: SI, 1.22; 95% CI, 0.85 to 1.77; women: SI, 1.53; 95% CI, 0.79 to 2.97), and hyperglycemia (men: SI, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.72 to 1.47; women: SI, 1.39; 95% CI, 0.75 to 2.57).
Conclusion
Hyperuricemia and abdominal obesity synergistically increased the risk of hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-C in both sexes.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Prevalence and factors associated with overweight, obesity and central obesity among adults in Shenmu City, Shaanxi Province, China
    Mingxia Liu, Chunjiao Jia, Yaoda Hu, Juan Liu, Lizhen Liu, Shengli Sun, Haiying Wang, Yonglin Liu
    Preventive Medicine Reports.2024; 40: 102673.     CrossRef
  • Synergistic interaction between hyperlipidemia and obesity as a risk factor for stress urinary incontinence in Americans
    Fangyi Zhu, Mao Chen, Ya Xiao, Xiaoyu Huang, Liying Chen, Li Hong
    Scientific Reports.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Uric Acid Inhibits Mice Pancreatic Steatosis via the Glycerophospholipid Pathway
    Yang Xiao, Lina Han, Han Wang, Helin Ke, Shaodan Xu, Zhibin Huang, Guorong Lyu, Shilin Li
    ACS Omega.2024; 9(20): 21829.     CrossRef
  • The role of cognitive function in the relationship between surrogate markers of visceral fat and depressive symptoms in general middle-aged and elderly population: A nationwide population-based study
    Na Zhang, Jianqian Chao, Xueyu Wu, Hongling Chen, Min Bao
    Journal of Affective Disorders.2023; 338: 581.     CrossRef
  • Biodegradation of Uric Acid by Bacillus paramycoides-YC02
    Xiaoyu Cao, Jingyuan Cai, Yu Zhang, Chao Liu, Meijie Song, Qianqian Xu, Yang Liu, Hai Yan
    Microorganisms.2023; 11(8): 1989.     CrossRef
  • A predictive model for hyperuricemia among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Urumqi, China
    Palizhati Abudureyimu, Yuesheng Pang, Lirun Huang, Qianqian Luo, Xiaozheng Zhang, Yifan Xu, Liang Jiang, Patamu Mohemaiti
    BMC Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Dietary Ferulic Acid Ameliorates Metabolism Syndrome-Associated Hyperuricemia in Rats via Regulating Uric Acid Synthesis, Glycolipid Metabolism, and Hepatic Injury
    Nanhai Zhang, Jingxuan Zhou, Lei Zhao, Ou Wang, Liebing Zhang, Feng Zhou
    Frontiers in Nutrition.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Complication
Waist Circumference and Body Mass Index Variability and Incident Diabetic Microvascular Complications: A Post Hoc Analysis of ACCORD Trial
Daniel Nyarko Hukportie, Fu-Rong Li, Rui Zhou, Jia-Zhen Zheng, Xiao-Xiang Wu, Xian-Bo Wu
Diabetes Metab J. 2022;46(5):767-780.   Published online May 10, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2021.0258
  • 4,156 View
  • 224 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Obesity is associated with adverse health events among diabetic patients, however, the relationship between obesity fluctuation and risk of microvascular complications among this specific population is unclear. We aimed to examine the effect of waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) variability on the risk of diabetic microvascular outcome
Methods
Annually recorded anthropometric data in the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) study was used to examine the association of WC and BMI variability defined as variability independent of mean, with the risk of microvascular outcomes, including neuropathy, nephropathy, and retinopathy. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) (Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov., no. NCT00000620).
Results
There were 4,031, 5,369, and 2,601 cases of neuropathy, nephropathy, and retinopathy during a follow-up period of 22,524, 23,941, and 23,850 person-years, respectively. Higher levels of WC and BMI variability were associated with an increased risk of neuropathy. Compared with the lowest quartile, the fully-adjusted HR (95% CI) for the highest quartile of WC and BMI variability for neuropathy risk were 1.21 (1.05 to 1.40) and 1.16 (1.00 to 1.33), respectively. Also, higher quartiles of BMI variability but not WC variability were associated with increased risk of nephropathic events. The fully-adjusted HR (95% CI) for the highest quartile compared with the lowest quartile of BMI variability was 1.31 (1.18 to 1.46). However, the results for retinopathic events were all insignificant.
Conclusion
Among participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus, WC and BMI variability were associated with a higher risk of neuropathic events, whereas BMI variability was associated with an increased risk of nephropathic events.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association of body mass index and blood pressure variability with 10-year mortality and renal disease progression in type 2 diabetes
    Stephen Fava, Sascha Reiff
    Acta Diabetologica.2024; 61(6): 747.     CrossRef
  • Investigating the causal association of generalized and abdominal obesity with microvascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes: A community‐based prospective study
    Jiaheng Chen, Yu Ting Li, Zimin Niu, Zhanpeng He, Yao Jie Xie, Jose Hernandez, Wenyong Huang, Harry H X Wang
    Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Serum Spexin Level Is Negatively Associated With Peripheral Neuropathy and Sensory Pain in Type 2 Diabetes
    Ying Liu, Di Wu, Hangping Zheng, Yunzhi Ni, Lu Zhu, Yaojing Jiang, Jiarong Dai, Quanya Sun, Ying Zhao, Qi Zhang, Yehong Yang, Rui Liu
    Journal of Diabetes Research.2024; 2024: 1.     CrossRef
  • Waist Circumference and Body Mass Index Variability and Incident Diabetic Microvascular Complications: A Post Hoc Analysis of ACCORD Trial (Diabetes Metab J 2022;46:767-80)
    Yun Kyung Cho
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2023; 47(1): 147.     CrossRef
  • Waist Circumference and Body Mass Index Variability and Incident Diabetic Microvascular Complications: A Post Hoc Analysis of ACCORD Trial (Diabetes Metab J 2022;46:767-80)
    Daniel Nyarko Hukportie, Fu-Rong Li, Rui Zhou, Jia-Zhen Zheng, Xiao-Xiang Wu, Xian-Bo Wu
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2023; 47(1): 150.     CrossRef
  • Weight variability and diabetes complications
    Francesco Prattichizzo, Chiara Frigé, Rosalba La Grotta, Antonio Ceriello
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice.2023; 199: 110646.     CrossRef
  • Risk Factors for Diabetic Retinopathy in Latin America (Mexico) and the World: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Oscar Vivanco-Rojas, Sonia López-Letayf, Valentina Londoño-Angarita, Fátima Sofía Magaña-Guerrero, Beatriz Buentello-Volante, Yonathan Garfias
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(20): 6583.     CrossRef
  • Effects of body weight variability on risks of macro- and microvascular outcomes in individuals with type 2 diabetes: The Rio de Janeiro type 2 diabetes cohort
    Claudia R.L. Cardoso, Nathalie C. Leite, Gil F. Salles
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice.2023; 205: 110992.     CrossRef
  • Correlation Between the Variability of Different Obesity Indices and Diabetic Kidney Disease: A Retrospective Cohort Study Based on Populations in Taiwan
    Zhenzhen Sun, Kun Wang, Chuan Yun, Fang Bai, Xiaodan Yuan, Yaujiunn Lee, Qingqing Lou
    Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity.2023; Volume 16: 2791.     CrossRef
  • Unraveling shared risk factors for diabetic foot ulcer: a comprehensive Mendelian randomization analysis
    Kangli Yin, Tianci Qiao, Yongkang Zhang, Jiarui Liu, Yuzhen Wang, Fei Qi, Junlin Deng, Cheng Zhao, Yongcheng Xu, Yemin Cao
    BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care.2023; 11(6): e003523.     CrossRef
Complication
Association between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Brain Atrophy: A Meta-Analysis
Tianqi Zhang, Marnie Shaw, Nicolas Cherbuin
Diabetes Metab J. 2022;46(5):781-802.   Published online March 8, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2021.0189
  • 6,994 View
  • 303 Download
  • 14 Web of Science
  • 22 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is known to be associated with cognitive decline and brain structural changes. This study systematically reviews and estimates human brain volumetric differences and atrophy associated with T2DM.
Methods
PubMed, PsycInfo and Cochrane Library were searched for brain imaging studies reporting on brain volume differences between individuals with T2DM and healthy controls. Data were examined using meta-analysis, and association between age, sex, diabetes characteristics and brain volumes were tested using meta-regression.
Results
A total of 14,605 entries were identified; after title, abstract and full-text screening applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, 64 studies were included and 42 studies with compatible data contributed to the meta-analysis (n=31,630; mean age 71.0 years; 44.4% male; 26,942 control; 4,688 diabetes). Individuals with T2DM had significantly smaller total brain volume, total grey matter volume, total white matter volume and hippocampal volume (approximately 1% to 4%); meta-analyses of smaller samples focusing on other brain regions and brain atrophy rate in longitudinal investigations also indicated smaller brain volumes and greater brain atrophy associated with T2DM. Meta-regression suggests that diabetes-related brain volume differences start occurring in early adulthood, decreases with age and increases with diabetes duration.
Conclusion
T2DM is associated with smaller total and regional brain volume and greater atrophy over time. These effects are substantial and highlight an urgent need to develop interventions to reduce the risk of T2DM for brain health.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Diabetes, antidiabetic medications and risk of dementia: A systematic umbrella review and meta‐analysis
    Alvin Kuate Defo, Veselko Bakula, Alessandro Pisaturo, Christopher Labos, Simon S. Wing, Stella S. Daskalopoulou
    Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.2024; 26(2): 441.     CrossRef
  • Cognitive deficits among people with schizophrenia and prediabetes or diabetes
    Alexander Panickacheril John, Thynn Mya, Darren Haywood
    Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica.2024; 149(1): 65.     CrossRef
  • The association of glucose metabolism measures and diabetes status with Alzheimer’s disease biomarkers of amyloid and tau: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Veerle van Gils, Marianna Rizzo, Jade Côté, Wolfgang Viechtbauer, Giuseppe Fanelli, Jordi Salas-Salvadó, Theresa Wimberley, Mònica Bulló, Fernando Fernandez-Aranda, Søren Dalsgaard, Pieter Jelle Visser, Willemijn J. Jansen, Stephanie J.B. Vos
    Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews.2024; 159: 105604.     CrossRef
  • ECHDC3 Variant Regulates the Right Hippocampal Microstructural Integrity and Verbal Memory in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
    Qiyu Zhao, Xin Du, Feng Liu, Yang Zhang, Wen Qin, Quan Zhang
    Neuroscience.2024; 538: 30.     CrossRef
  • The hemodynamic response function as a type 2 diabetes biomarker: a data-driven approach
    Pedro Guimarães, Pedro Serranho, João V. Duarte, Joana Crisóstomo, Carolina Moreno, Leonor Gomes, Rui Bernardes, Miguel Castelo-Branco
    Frontiers in Neuroinformatics.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • What have clinical trials taught us about brain health?
    Keon-Joo Lee, Hee-Joon Bae
    Cerebral Circulation - Cognition and Behavior.2024; 6: 100199.     CrossRef
  • Understanding the relationship between type-2 diabetes, MRI markers of neurodegeneration and small vessel disease, and dementia risk: a mediation analysis
    Leslie Grasset, Eric Frison, Catherine Helmer, Gwénaëlle Catheline, Geneviève Chêne, Carole Dufouil
    European Journal of Epidemiology.2024; 39(4): 409.     CrossRef
  • Vulnerability of the Hippocampus to Insults: Links to Blood–Brain Barrier Dysfunction
    Terry L. Davidson, Richard J. Stevenson
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2024; 25(4): 1991.     CrossRef
  • Diabetes mellitus in older persons with neurocognitive disorder: overtreatment prevalence and associated structural brain MRI findings
    Pauline Putallaz, Laurence Seematter-Bagnoud, Bogdan Draganski, Olivier Rouaud, Hélène Krief, Christophe J. Büla
    BMC Geriatrics.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Accelerometer‐Measured Behavior Patterns in Incident Cerebrovascular Disease: Insights for Preventative Monitoring From the UK Biobank
    Stephanie J. Zawada, Ali Ganjizadeh, Gian Marco Conte, Bart M. Demaerschalk, Bradley J. Erickson
    Journal of the American Heart Association.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The gut microbiota‐astrocyte axis: Implications for type 2 diabetic cognitive dysfunction
    Zi‐Han Li, Ya‐Yi Jiang, Cai‐Yi Long, Qian Peng, Ren‐Song Yue
    CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics.2023; 29(S1): 59.     CrossRef
  • NHANES 2011–2014 Reveals Decreased Cognitive Performance in U.S. Older Adults with Metabolic Syndrome Combinations
    Edgar Díaz-Camargo, Juan Hernández-Lalinde, María Sánchez-Rubio, Yudy Chaparro-Suárez, Liseth Álvarez-Caicedo, Alexandra Fierro-Zarate, Marbel Gravini-Donado, Henry García-Pacheco, Joselyn Rojas-Quintero, Valmore Bermúdez
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2023; 20(7): 5257.     CrossRef
  • People with Diabetes Have Poorer Self-Rated Health (SRH) and Diabetes Moderates the Association between Age and SRH
    Weixi Kang, Antonio Malvaso
    Diseases.2023; 11(2): 73.     CrossRef
  • Cognitive dysfunction in diabetes: abnormal glucose metabolic regulation in the brain
    Shan Zhang, Yueying Zhang, Zhige Wen, YaNan Yang, Tianjie Bu, Xiangwei Bu, Qing Ni
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The psychological basis of hunger and its dysfunctions
    Richard J Stevenson
    Nutrition Reviews.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Associations of Glucose Metabolism Status with Brain Macrostructure and Microstructure: Findings from the UK Biobank
    Ruyi Li, Tingting Geng, Lin Li, Qi Lu, Rui Li, Xue Chen, Yunjing Ou, Sen Liu, Xiaoyu Lin, Qingying Tian, Zixin Qiu, Kai Zhu, Ziyue Tang, Kun Yang, An Pan, Gang Liu
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.2023; 109(1): e234.     CrossRef
  • Association Between Frequency of Social Contact and Brain Atrophy in Community-Dwelling Older People Without Dementia
    Naoki Hirabayashi, Takanori Honda, Jun Hata, Yoshihiko Furuta, Mao Shibata, Tomoyuki Ohara, Yasuko Tatewaki, Yasuyuki Taki, Shigeyuki Nakaji, Tetsuya Maeda, Kenjiro Ono, Masaru Mimura, Kenji Nakashima, Jun-ichi Iga, Minoru Takebayashi, Toshiharu Ninomiya,
    Neurology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A diagnosis model for brain atrophy using deep learning and MRI of type 2 diabetes mellitus
    Saba Raoof Syed, Saleem Durai M. A.
    Frontiers in Neuroscience.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Diabetes: a tipping point in neurodegenerative diseases
    Jose A. Santiago, Mridula Karthikeyan, Madison Lackey, Diana Villavicencio, Judith A. Potashkin
    Trends in Molecular Medicine.2023; 29(12): 1029.     CrossRef
  • Association between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Brain Atrophy: A Meta-Analysis (Diabetes Metab J 2022;46:781-802)
    Tianqi Zhang, Marnie Shaw, Nicolas Cherbuin
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2022; 46(5): 815.     CrossRef
  • Association between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Brain Atrophy: A Meta-Analysis (Diabetes Metab J 2022;46:781-802)
    Se Hee Min
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2022; 46(5): 813.     CrossRef
  • MORPHOFUNCTIONAL CHANGES OF THE BRAIN IN DIABETES MELLITUS
    A. V. Smirnov, A. I Bisinbekova, T. I Faibisovich
    Journal of Volgograd State Medical University.2022; 19(3): 3.     CrossRef
Brief Reports
Metabolic Risk/Epidemiology
Rising Incidence of Diabetes in Young Adults in South Korea: A National Cohort Study
Hyun Ho Choi, Giwoong Choi, Hojun Yoon, Kyoung Hwa Ha, Dae Jung Kim
Diabetes Metab J. 2022;46(5):803-807.   Published online January 11, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2021.0236
  • 65,535 View
  • 399 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
We investigated the incidence of diagnosed diabetes in South Korean adults (aged ≥20 years) by analyzing data for the National Health Insurance Service–National Sample Cohort. From 2006 to 2015, the overall incidence rate of diagnosed diabetes decreased by approximately 0.1% per year until 2015. Although, this trend was observed in individuals aged 40 years or over, the rate increased slightly in the 20–29 and 30–39 years age groups, from 0.5 to 0.7 and 2.0 to 2.6 per 1,000 individuals, respectively. The proportion of obese young adults with diabetes increased remarkably, from 51.4% in 2006 to 72.4% in 2015. Thus, young adults need early identification and weight-control strategies to prevent diabetes.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Cumulative exposure to hypertriglyceridemia and risk of type 2 diabetes in young adults
    Min-Kyung Lee, Kyungdo Han, Bongsung Kim, Jong-Dai Kim, Moon Jung Kim, Byungpyo Kim, Jung Heo, Jiyeon Ahn, Seo-Young Sohn, Jae-Hyuk Lee
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice.2024; 208: 111109.     CrossRef
  • Young-Onset Diabetes in East Asians: From Epidemiology to Precision Medicine
    Juliana C.N. Chan, Chun-Kwan O, Andrea O.Y. Luk
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2024; 39(2): 239.     CrossRef
  • Diabetes screening in South Korea: a new estimate of the number needed to screen to detect diabetes
    Kyoung Hwa Ha, Kyung Ae Lee, Kyung-Do Han, Min Kyong Moon, Dae Jung Kim
    The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine.2023; 38(1): 93.     CrossRef
  • Revisiting the Diabetes Crisis in Korea: Call for Urgent Action
    Jun Sung Moon
    The Journal of Korean Diabetes.2023; 24(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Position Statement on the Appropriateness and Significance of Adding the Glycated Hemoglobin Test to the National Health Examination
    Ji Hye Kim, Dae Jung Kim, Jaehyun Kim, Sangjoon Park, Kyunghoon Lee, Jun Goo Kang, Eu Jeong Ku, Su Kyoung Kwon, Won Jun Kim, Young Sang Lyu, Jang Won Son, Young Sil Eom, Kyung Ae Lee, Jeongrim Lee, Jung Min Lee, Jung Hwa Lee, Jung Hwa Jung, Hochan Cho, Da
    The Journal of Korean Diabetes.2023; 24(4): 178.     CrossRef
  • Diabetes Fact Sheet in Korea 2021
    Jae Hyun Bae, Kyung-Do Han, Seung-Hyun Ko, Ye Seul Yang, Jong Han Choi, Kyung Mook Choi, Hyuk-Sang Kwon, Kyu Chang Won
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2022; 46(3): 417.     CrossRef
  • 젊은 2형 당뇨병 환자의 관리
    재현 배
    Public Health Weekly Report.2022; 15(35): 2474.     CrossRef
  • Screening for Prediabetes and Diabetes in Korean Nonpregnant Adults: A Position Statement of the Korean Diabetes Association, 2022
    Kyung Ae Lee, Dae Jung Kim, Kyungdo Han, Suk Chon, Min Kyong Moon
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2022; 46(6): 819.     CrossRef
Metabolic Risk/Epidemiology
Trends in the Prevalence of Obesity and Its Phenotypes Based on the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2007 to 2017 in Korea
Sang Ouk Chin, You-Cheol Hwang, Hong-Yup Ahn, Ji Eun Jun, In-Kyung Jeong, Kyu Jeung Ahn, Ho Yeon Chung
Diabetes Metab J. 2022;46(5):808-812.   Published online March 8, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2021.0226
  • 4,279 View
  • 220 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
This study used data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV–VII from 2007 to identify the prevalence of obesity and its phenotypes (metabolically unhealthy obesity [MUO] and metabolically healthy obesity [MHO]) and their secular changes. The prevalence of obesity in Korea increased with significant secular changes observed (β=0.326, P trend <0.01) between 2007 and 2017, and especially in men (β=0.682, P trend <0.001) but not in women. The changes in the prevalence of obesity during the study period were different between men and women (P=0.001). The prevalence of MUO significantly increased only in men (β=0.565, P trend <0.01), while that of MHO increased only in women (β=0.179, P<0.05), especially in the younger age group (β=0.308, P<0.01).

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Link between obesity and growth in children and adolescents
    Hae Sang Lee
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2024; 67(5): 330.     CrossRef
  • Hormonal Gut–Brain Signaling for the Treatment of Obesity
    Eun Roh, Kyung Mook Choi
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2023; 24(4): 3384.     CrossRef
  • Differences of Regional Fat Distribution Measured by Magnetic Resonance Imaging According to Obese Phenotype in Koreans
    Ha-Neul Choi, Hyunjung Lim, Young-Seol Kim, Sang-Youl Rhee, Jung-Eun Yim
    Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders.2022; 20(10): 551.     CrossRef
Letter
Association between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Brain Atrophy: A Meta-Analysis (Diabetes Metab J 2022;46:781-802)
Se Hee Min
Diabetes Metab J. 2022;46(5):813-814.   Published online September 19, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2022.0259
[Original]
  • 2,402 View
  • 133 Download
PDFPubReader   ePub   

Diabetes Metab J : Diabetes & Metabolism Journal
Close layer