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Yun Kyung Cho  (Cho YK) 3 Articles
Can the Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) done at Postpartum (PPT) 1 Wddk Substitute OGTT at PPT 6 Week OGTT at PPT 6 Week in Diagnosing Rersistent PPT Glucose Intolerance in the Patients with Gastrational Diagetes Melltus (GDM)?.
Yoo Lee Kim, Yong Wook Cho, Seok Won Park, Yun Kyung Cho, Hwa Young Lee, In Hyun Kim, Jong Gun Won, Hye Sun Jun, Ho Taek Lee, Seog Ki Lee, Sang Jong Lee
Korean Diabetes J. 2000;24(2):267-280.   Published online January 1, 2001
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Although 75 g-OGTT at PPT 6 week is necessary to diagnose persistent PPT glucose intolerance (PPGI) in GDM patients, it 1s difficult to perform this test because many patients drop-out during the follow-up period. Thus we tested whether OGTT done at PPT 1 week can substitute OGTT at PPT 6 week in diagnosing PPGI in GDM patients. METHOD: In 370 GDM patients, 75 g-OGTT was performed at PPT 1 week and repeat OGTT was done in 196 patients at PPT 6 week. Results of OGTT were classified as normal glucose tolerance(NGT), impaired glucose tolerance(IGT), and diabetes mellitus (DM) according to National Diabetes Data Group(NDDG) criteria. Changes in glucose tolerance state between PPT 1 and 6 week were assessed, and the predictability of clinical characteristics for these changes were investigated by logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Among 370 GDM patients who performed OGTT at PPT 1 week, 79.4% had NGT, 12.2% had IGT, and 8.4% had DM. 53% (196/370) of subjects repeated OGTT at PPT 6 week. In OGTT at PPT 6 week, 77.6% (152/196, 140/149 in NGT, 4/26 in IGT and 8/21 in DM) were in the same glucose tolerance state as at PPT 1 week. The glucose tolerance improved in 14.8% (29/196, 16/26 in IGT and 13/21 in DM) and deteriorated in 7,6% (15/196, 9/149 in NGT and 6/26 in IGT). 94%(140/149) of patients who had NGT at PPT 1 week had NGT at PPT b week and 48.9/o (23/47) of patients who had abnormal glucose tolerance at PPT 1 week had abnormal glucose tolerance at PPT 6 week. Mean fasting plasma glucose level on OGTT became lower at PPT 1 week than during pregnancy (4.6+/-0,8 vs 5.1+/-1.2mmol/L, p<0.05) and became higher at PPT 6 week than at PPT 1 week (5.4+/-1.1 vs 4.6+/-0.8 mmol/L, p<0.05). Mean plasma glucose level at 2 hour after glucose load was significantly lower at PPT 6 week than at PPT 1 week (7.2+/-2.7 vs 8.3+/-2.5 mmol/L). When the subjects were grouped into NGT, IGT, and DM according to glucose tolerance state at PPT 6 week, the NGT group already showed normal glucose tolerance at PPT 1 week. The IGT and DM group showed slightly lower glucose levels at PPT 1 week than during pregnancy but became high to the level during pregnancy at PPT 6 week. In the patients group showing deterioration in glucose tolerance state between PPT 1 and 6 week, prevalence of insulin treatment was higher (63.4% vs 9.4, 20.7%), the gestational age at diagnosis of GDM were lower (25.0+/-6.2 week vs 29.8+/-3.3, 29.9+/-4,8 waek), and prepregnant weight was higher (113.4+/-21.2% vs 102.5+/-12.4, 102.4+/-14.6%) than those in the patients groups showing no change and improvement in glucose tolerance state, Weight gain until diagnosis of GDM during pregnancy(5.7+/-4.4kg vs 9.4+/-3.4kg) and weight change between prepregnancy and PPT 5 week(-1,3+/-3.5kg vs 1.5+/-29kg) was smaller in the deterioration group than those in the no change group. Logistic regression analysis performed using improvement and deterioration of glucose tolerance state between PPT 1 and 6 week as an outcome of interest revealed that an earlier diagnosis of GDM and a smaller weight at PPT 6 week than prepregnant weight were independent predictors for deterioration of glucose tolerance between PPT 1 and 6 week. In conclusion, OGTT done at PPT 1 week can substitute OGTT at PPT 6 week in a large subgroup of GDM patients who has NGT at PPT 1 week without any risk factors for deterioration in glucose tolerance.
Relationship Among Urinary Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) Excretion Rates, Urinary Albumin Excretion and Macrovascular Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.
Yoon Sang Choi, Sang Hoon Kim, Hyang Kim, Yun Kyung Cho, Hyun Ju Um, Si Yong Kim, Byong Ik Kim, Yoo Lee Kim, Hwa Young Lee, Sang Jong Lee
Korean Diabetes J. 2000;24(2):245-255.   Published online January 1, 2001
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Increased loss of proteoglycan (PG) from glomerular basement membrane (GBM) has been postulated to alter glomerular charge selectivity which contributes to urinary loss of albumin. The glycosaminoglycan (GAG) is the degradation products of PG. Recently, one of the hypothesis suggested that urinary albumin execretion(UAE) reflects not only merely a glomerular manifes-tation but also a macrovascular disease (by Deckert et al), Wasty et al. reported a significant decrease in total GAG concentration and marked changes in their distribution in atherosclarotic plaques in human. Thus, the alterations in the metabolism of GAG might play a role in the pathogenesis of diabetic macroangiopathy. Therefore, we investigated the relationship among urinary GAG execretion rates, UAE and macrovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS: We measured urinary excretion rates of GAS in type 2 diabetic patients with and without macrovascular disease ( cerebrovascular disease, ischemic heart disease and other peripheral vascular disease ) and investigated the relationships among urinary execretion of GAG, UAE and macrovascular disease in 103 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. RESULTS: 1) Among total 103 patients, 66 patients (64.0%) showed normoal-buminuria, 18 patients (17.5%) showed microabluminuria and 19 paitents (18.4%) showed macro albuminuria respectively. The duration of diabetes mellitus and the prevalence of hypertension, diabetic retinopathy and macrovascular disease were increased according to the degree of UAE. 2) The urinary excretion rates of GAG in type 2 diabetes mellitus with normo-, microand macro-albuminuria were 6.72+/-4.05, 9.17+/-3.26 and 14.20+/-6.13 microgram glucuronic acid/min respectively (p<0.05). The urinary GAG levels were significantly correlated with UAE (r=0.43, p<0.05). 3) The urinary excretion rates of GAG in type 2 diabetes mellitus with (n=26) and without (n=77) macrovascular disease were 6.21+/-2.75 and 9,31+/-5.59 ug glucuronic acid/min, respectively (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: 1) The urinary excretion rates of GAG were decreased in patients with macro vascular complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus. 2) The urinary excretion rates of GAG may be a possible marker of macrovascular disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Yet, further large prospective studies are necessary to confirm our findings.
Antepartum Characteristics Predicting Persistent Postpartum Glucose lntolerance in the Patients with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM).
Yoo Lee Kim, Yong Wook Cho, Seok Won Park, Seog Ki Lee, In Sup Ahn, Byung Wook Na, Jun Lee, Yun Kyung Cho, Hwa Young Lee, Sang Jong Lee
Korean Diabetes J. 2000;24(1):46-59.   Published online January 1, 2001
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of persistent postpartum glucose intolerance and to examine antepartum clinical characteri-stics for their predictability of persistent postpartum glucose intolerance in the patients with GDM. METHODS: In 211 GDM patients who showed more than two abnormal glucose values of O'Sullivan and Mahan's criteria on 100g-oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), 75g-OGTT were performed at 6 weeks postpartum. The incidence of postpartum normal glucose tolerance (NGT), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and diabetes mellitus (DM) were investigated and antepartum ciinical parameters were compared among the three groups, Predictability of antepartum clinical characteristics for postpartum IGT and DM were also investigated by logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: When we grouped the patients into postpartum NGT, IGT, DM according to the results of 75g-OGTT performed 6 weeks postpartum, The incidence were 81,5% of subjects had NGT, 9.0% had IGT, and 9.5% had DM. Plasma glucose levels and GAUC on antepartum 100 g-OGTT(NGT: 1660+/-159, IGT: 1948+/-730, DM: 2538+/-629mmol/L ' min), and proportion of patients receiving insulin therapy increased progressively and significantly in association with worsening postpartum glucose tolerance. Frequency of positive family history of DM in qroups with IGT and DM (63,2% & 80.0%) were significantly higher than that in group with NGT(37,2%). Weight gain before diagnosis of GDM in groups with IGT and DM(6.7+/-3.9kg & 6.8+/-4.1 kg) were significantly smaller than that of group with NGT(9.5+/-3,5kg), Gestational age at diagnosis of GDM in group with DM(25.8+/-5.4 weeks) was significantly shorter than that in group with NGT(30.0+/-3,3 weeks), Proportion of subjects diagnosed earlier than 24 weeks of gestation were significantly higher in groups with IGT (15.8%) and DM (25.0%) than in group with NGT (1.2%). Proportions of subjects delivered heavier infants, > or =4 kg,were significantly higher in the DM group (40.0%) than in the NGT group (9.3%). In the patients having fasting plasma glucose levels hlgher than 5.8 mmol/L on antepartum 100g-OGTT, the prevalence of persistent glucose intolerance was significantly higher than in the patients FPG level lower than 5.8 mmol/L (61.9% vs 7.7%), Logistic regression analysis were performed using IGT and DM as the outcome of interest. The GAUC on antepartum 100g-OGTT, family history of DM, and the gestational age at diagnosis of GDM were independent predictors for both postpartum DM and postpartum IGT. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of persistent postpartum glucose intolerance in GDM patients were 18.5% and the most important independent predictor for persistent postpartum glucose intolerance was the degree of severity in glucose intolerance during pregnancy.

Diabetes Metab J : Diabetes & Metabolism Journal