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Kyung Soo Ko  (Ko KS) 13 Articles
Cloning of Novel Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) Plasmid for Gene Therapy on Diabetic Foot Ulcer.
Hye Sook Chung, Chang Shin Yoon, Min Jeong Kwon, Mi Kyung Kim, Soon Hee Lee, Kyung Soo Ko, Byung Doo Rhee, Jeong Hyun Park
Korean Diabetes J. 2008;32(2):131-140.   Published online April 1, 2008
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2008.32.2.131
  • 1,783 View
  • 38 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) is one of the important growth factors involved in the epithelialization during cutaneous wound healing. Peptide EGF has been used for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer. But the inferiority of cost-effectiveness and the inconvenience of daily application might have restricted its wide clinical usage. EGF gene therapy could dramatically improve the efficacy and inconvenience through long-term expression and bypassing the EGF degradation by hostile non-specific proteinases expressed in the wound bed. METHODS: EGF DNAs were amplified via PCR. For the more effective secretion from the transfected cell, we inserted furin cleavage site into EGF plasmids. The efficacy of novel plasmid pbeta-EGF was verified by transfection into the various animal cell lines, and the biologic potency of expressed EGF was confirmed via phosphorylation of PI3K and GSK3beta by Western blotting. RESULTS: We tested various kinds of human EGFs. One of the human EGF isoforms, EGF(828) including a membrane-anchoring domain was successfully released as the mature EGF protein in the cell culture media. Also EGF plasmid including furin cleavage site showed more than 2-fold increased EGF expression compared with the sequence without furin cleavage site. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, these findings suggest that mature EGF could be released easily out of cells by modifying EGF DNA sequence. Our novel EGF plasmid DNA could markedly increase the efficiency of non-viral gene therapy for diabetic foot ulcer.

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  • Effective healing of diabetic skin wounds by using nonviral gene therapy based on minicircle vascular endothelial growth factor DNA and a cationic dendrimer
    Min J. Kwon, Songhie An, Sunghyun Choi, Kihoon Nam, Hye S. Jung, Chang S. Yoon, Jung H. Ko, Hye J. Jun, Tae K. Kim, Soo J. Jung, Jeong H. Park, Yan Lee, Jong‐Sang Park
    The Journal of Gene Medicine.2012; 14(4): 272.     CrossRef
Mitochondrial Gene Therapy.
Kyung Soo Ko
Korean Diabetes J. 2007;31(3):187-192.   Published online May 1, 2007
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/jkda.2007.31.3.187
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to a large variety of human disorders, ranging from neurodegenerative and neuromuscular diseases, obesity, and diabetes to ischemia-reperfusion injury and cancer. Increasing pharmacological efforts toward therapeutic interventions have been made leading to the emergence of 'Mitochondrial Medicine' as a new field of biomedical research. The identification of molecular mitochondrial drugs targets in combination with the development of methods for selectively delivering biologically active molecules to the site of mitochondria will eventually launch a multitude of new therapies for the treatment of mitochondria-related diseases, which are based either on the selective protection, repair, or eradication of cells. Yet, while tremendous efforts are being undertaken to identify new mitochondrial drugs and drug targets, the development of mitochondria-specific drug carrier systems is lagging behind. To ensure a high efficiency of current and future mitochondrial therapeutics, delivery systems need to be developed, which are able to selectively transport biologically active molecules to and into mitochondria within living cells.
Serum Adiponectin, TNF-alpha, IL-6 and Insulin Resistance in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.
Young A Kim, Jung Hyun Noh, Dong Jun Kim, Tae Hyun Um, Chong Rae Cho, Na young Jang, Soo Kyung Kwon, Soon Hee Lee, Jeong Hyun Park, Kyung Soo Ko, Byoung Doo Rhee, Kyung Ho Lim
Korean Diabetes J. 2006;30(2):104-111.   Published online March 1, 2006
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/jkda.2006.30.2.104
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  • 19 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
To determine plasma adipokines such as adiponectin, IL-6 and TNF-alpha concentrations in women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and to assess possible correlations of adipocytokines to the hormonal and metabolic parameters, including measures of insulin resistance (IR). METHODS: Forty-four selected women were classified as follows: 13 obese (body mass index [BMI] > or = 25 kg/m(2)) with PCOS; 15 non-obese (BMI < 25 kg/m(2)) with PCOS; 8 obese without PCOS, and 8 non-obese without PCOS. Blood samples were collected from all women with or without PCOS after an overnight fast. Serum levels of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), total testosterone, 17-alpha-hydroxyprogesterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), insulin, glucose, adiponectin, TNF-alpha and IL-6 were measured. Measures of IR included HOMA-IR and QUICKI. RESULTS: In non-obese group, fasting insulin levels and HOMA-IR in PCOS were significantly higher compared to control. However, Adiponectin, TNF-alpha and IL-6 concentrations were found not to be different in obese women with PCOS as compared with obese women without PCOS and in non-obese women with PCOS as compared with non-obese women without PCOS. Adiponectin concentrations correlated inversely with BMI, waist circumference (WC), total fat mass, serum insulin, and HOMA-IR in PCOS group. However, multiple regression analysis showed that BMI was the only independent determinant of adiponectin concentration. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that insulin sensitivity per se probably does not play any role in the control of adipokines levels such as adiponectin, TNF-alpha and IL-6 in PCOS women

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  • Adiponectin in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
    Hyun-Young Shin, Duk-Chul Lee, Ji-Won Lee
    Korean Journal of Family Medicine.2011; 32(4): 243.     CrossRef
Insulin Resistance and Metabolic Syndrome.
Kyung Soo Ko, Byoung Doo Rhee
Korean Diabetes J. 2005;29(6):501-506.   Published online November 1, 2005
  • 920 View
  • 18 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
No abstract available.
Therapeutic Potential of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1.
Kyung Soo Ko, Seung Joon Oh, Tae Wha Kim
Korean Diabetes J. 2004;28(2):51-62.   Published online April 1, 2004
  • 739 View
  • 18 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
No abstract available.
Gene Therapy for the Prevention of Autoimmune Diabetes.
Kyung Soo Ko
Korean Diabetes J. 2002;26(2):75-86.   Published online April 1, 2002
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  • 16 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
No abstract available.
The Prevalence of Islet Cell Cytoplasmic Antibody in Korean Type 1 Diabetes: Possible Replacement with Combined Measurement of Anti-GAD, Anti-ICA512, and Anti-phogrin Antibodies.
Kyoung Ah Kim, Dong Jun Kim, Jae Hoon Chung, Yong Ki Min, Moon Kyu Lee, Kwang Won Kim, Dong Kyu Jin, Kyung Soo Ko, Sang Jin Kim, Myung Shik Lee
Korean Diabetes J. 2001;25(6):430-445.   Published online December 1, 2001
  • 1,413 View
  • 19 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Type 1 diabetes includes all forms of autoimmune-mediated and idiopathic beta-cell destruction leading to an absolute insulin deficiency. Evidence of an autoimmune pathogenesis was assessed by studying cytoplasmic islet cell antibodies (ICA), antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA), antibodies reacting with an islet tyrosine phosphatase-related molecule referred to as ICA512 (ICA512A), or its homologue phogrin (phogrin-A). In comparison with ICA, the best validation to assess the risk of type 1 diabetes, shows that a combination of antibodies to GADA with ICA512A has the power to detect a majority of ICA and 97~100% of subjects who progressed to overt diabetes. These findings suggest the possibility of replacing the laborious ICA test in the screening programs to identify subjects at risk of progressing to type 1 diabetes or forclassifying the stage of diabetes at the time of diagnosis. Up to now, it is unclear whether these results are applicable to the slowly progressive type 1 diabetes that appears to be more prevalent in Asian than in western countries. The prevalence of combined autoantibody testing (1 of GADA, ICA512A, or phogrin-A) was investigated in the patients with type 1 diabetes (typical and slowly progressive) and type 2 diabetes, and compared with that of ICA which is a more laborious and insensitive test. METHODS: The ICA assay was performed using immunoenzymatic staining of frozen human (blood group O) pancreatic sections with serial dilutions of serum samples with peroxidase-labeled protein A. For the GADA determination, commercially available GADA radioimmunoassay kits utilizing the 125I-labeled recombinant GAD65 (RSR , United Kingdom) as an antigen was used. Either ICA512A or phogrin-A were detected by a radioligand-binding assay after in vitro transcription and translation using the clone ICA512bdc or phogrin cDNA. Serum was obtainedfrom 76 patients with type 1 diabetes (mean age 22.8+/-14.0 years), 22 patients with slowly progressive type 1 diabetes (mean age 37.9+/-13.9 years) and 39 patients with type 2 diabetes (mean age 45.3+/-12.3 years). Typical and slowly progressive type 1 diabetes patients had the disease for between 4.0+/-4.6 and 10.1+/-9.5 years, respectively at the earliest serum sampling. RESULTS: 1) In typical type 1 diabetes, 30% of patients tested positive for ICA and 57% for the combined autoantibody test (1 of GADA, ICA512A, or phogrin-A). In the slowly progressive type 1 diabetes group, 18% of patients tested positive for ICA and 50% for the combined autoantibody test. In type 2 diabetes, 7.7% and 5.1% tested positive, respectively. 2) Ninety-six percent of ICA-positive patients expressed one or more of the 3 auto-antibody specificities in typical type 1 diabetes. Among the 53 ICA-negative patients with typical type 1 diabetes, 40% had one or more of these auto-antibodies. In the slowly progressive type 1 diabetes, 100% of the ICA-positive and 39% of the ICA- negative patients expressed one or more of the 3 autoantibody specificities. 3) Of the 23 patients with ICA-positive typical type 1 diabetes patients, 87% had a positive result for GADA, 48% for ICA512A, 44% for phogrin-A, and 96% for GADA or ICA512A. Of the 4 patients with ICA-positive slowly progressive type 1 diabetes, three had a positive result for GADA, and 1 for ICA512A. 4) When the prevalence of combined autoantibody testing was analyzed according to the duration of diabetes, the prevalence in patients tested within 4 years after the diagnosis and more than 4 years after the diagnosis was 61% and 52%, respectively in typical type 1 diabetes. Furthermore, that for the ICA was 37% and 21%, respectively. In the slowly progressive type 1 diabetes, the prevalence of combined auto-antibody testing was 88% and 25%, respectively (p<0.05), while that of ICA was 25% and 13%, respectively. 5) In typical type 1 diabetes, ICA were detected more frequently in patients younger than 15 years of age (48%) than in older patients (23%) (p<0.05), while the prevalence of combined auto-antibody testing -was not different according to the onset age (65% vs 53%). CONCLUSION: Combined autoantibody testing for GADA and ICA512A is more sensitive that ICA in type 1 diabetes. Therefore, it could replace the laborious ICA measurement and may be useful for discriminating the etiology of adult onset atypical diabetes.
Prevalence of Islet Cell Autoantibodies and Mitochondrial DNA Mutation among Typical and Atypical Type 1 Diabetic Patients in Korea.
Hong kyu Lee, Kee Up Lee, Sung Kwan Hong, Byuong Doo Rhee, Dong Seop Choi, Hyoung Woo Lee, Sang Wook Kim, Hee Jin Kim, Nan Hee Kim, Kyong Soo Park, Woo Je Lee, Kyung Soo Ko
Korean Diabetes J. 1999;23(4):541-551.   Published online January 1, 2001
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
American Diabetes Association (ADA) proposed new criteria for the classification of diabetic patients, which were mainly based on the presence of autoimmune markers. But it is questionable if we can apply the new ADA criteria to Korean type 1 diabetic patients directly. In this study, we measured several autoantibodies to islet cell in Korean subjects with typical and atypical clinical manifestations of type 1 diabetes mellitus. And mutation of mitochondrial DNA was analyzed in the same patients. METHODS: We measured fasting serum C-peptide in 1870 diabetic patients attending the diabetes clinic of Asan Medical Center. Among the 117 patients with fasting serum C-peptide less than 0.6 ng/mL, glucagon-stimulated C-peptide was measured, and 57 Patients showed the level less than 1 ng/mL and they were diagnosed as type 1 diabetic patients. They were subgrouped into typical (n=26, needed insulin injection within 1 year after diagnosis) and atypical (n=30, did not need insulin for more than l year after diagnosis) type 1 diabetic patients. ICA was measured by indirect immunofluorescence method. Anti-GAD antibody was measured by radioimmunoassay. Anti-ICA512 antibody was measured by western blotting. Mitochondrial DNA 3243 mutation was detected using restriction enzyme Apa-I digestion of the amplified genomic DNA from the subjects. RESULTS: 1) Median age of onset was 40 years for atypical type 1 diabetes patients, while it was 27.5 years for typical type 1 diabetes patients. Average duration of insulin requirement was 0.18 years for typical group and 5.73 years for atypical group. In this series, only typical type 1 diabetic patients experienced diabetic ketoacidosis. 2) Only 50 % of typical type 1 diabetic patients and 47 % of atypical type 1 diabetic patients had at least one autoantibody among ICA, anti-GAD antibody and anti-ICA512 antibody. 3) Mitochondrial DNA 3243 point mutation was detected in 3 patients with atypical type 1 diabetes (10 %), but it was not found in patients with typical type 1 diabetes. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the prevalence of autoantibodies in Korean type 1 diabetic patients was lower than that reported in Caucasians irrespective of clinical features. Therefore, it may not be easy to apply this new diabetes classification of ADA to Korean type 1 diabetic patients. In addition, mitochondrial DNA mutation may be responsible for some of the Korean atypical type 1 diabetic patients.
The Frequency of ICA and anti-GAD Antibody in Korean IDDM and NIDDM Patients.
Kyung Soo Ko, Sung Kwan Hong, Ki Up Lee, Nan Hee Kim, Dong Seop Choi, Sung Hee Ihm, Sung Woo Park, Chul Hee Kim, Dong Won Byun, Kyo Il Suh, Hak Chul Chang, Byoung Doo Rhee
Korean Diabetes J. 1998;22(3):312-319.   Published online January 1, 2001
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
It has been suggested that the clinical and immunological characteristics of diabetes mellitus in Koreans are different from those of Caucasians. This study was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of autoimmune markers in Korean adults with IDDM and recent-onset NIDDM. METHODS: Seventy-seven Korean adults with IDDM and 245 recently(within 2 years) diagnosed NIDDM were included in the study. Islet cell cytoplasmic antibody was measured by immunohistochemical method, and anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD) antibody was measured by radioimmunoassay. RESULTS: 1) The prevalence of ICA, anti-GAD antibody positivity was 27% and 40% in IDDM patients, and 5% and 4% in recent-onset NIDDM patients, respectively. 2) The prevalence of ICA positivity in IDDM patients decreased from 42% within one year to 21% over one year after clinical onset of disease. On the other hand, the positivity of anti-GAD antibody did not change according to the duration of diabetes. 3) The prevalence of ICA tends to be lower in IDDW patients with low serum C-peptide concentrations. In contrast, the prevalence of anti-GAD antibody was not different according to sernm C-peptide levels. CONCLUSION: These results suggested that the prevalence of ICA and antii-GAD antibody was lower in Korean adult IDDM and recent-onset NIDDM patients than that in Caucasians.
Low frequencies of human cytomegalovirus(hCMV) genome in diabetic patients.
Seco In Lee, Kyung Soo Ko, Kyong Soo Park, Seong Kwan Hong, Seong Yeon Kim, Bo Youn Cho, Hong Kyu Lee, Chang Soon Hoh, Hun Ki Min
Korean Diabetes J. 1993;17(1):45-50.   Published online January 1, 2001
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AbstractAbstract PDF
No abstract available.
The frequencies of HLA DQAI, DQBI alleles in Korean adult onset IDDM .
Sung Kwan Hong, Jong Ho Ahn, Kyung Soo Ko, Kyong Soo Park, Seong Yeon Kim, Bo Youn Cho, Hong Kyu Lee, Chang Soon Koh, Hun Ki Min, Yeon Bok Jang
Korean Diabetes J. 1992;16(2):121-127.   Published online January 1, 2001
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AbstractAbstract PDF
No abstract available.
A clinical study on the complications of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in Korea.
Kyung Soo Ko, Tae Gun Oh, Chul Hee Kim, Kyong Soo Park, Moon Kyu Lee, Seong Yeon Kim, Bo Yeon Cho, Hong Kyu Lee, Chang Soon Koh, Hun Ki Min
Korean Diabetes J. 1991;15(2):257-262.   Published online January 1, 2001
  • 838 View
  • 16 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
No abstract available.
Effect of Glipizide(Digrin@) in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.
Kyong Soo Park, Jae Hoon Jung, Kyung Soo Ko, Sung Kwan Hong, Seong Yeon Kim, Hong Kyu Lee, Chang Soon Koh, Hun Ki Min
Korean Diabetes J. 1991;15(1):103-107.   Published online January 1, 2001
  • 1,142 View
  • 17 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
No abstract available.

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