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Kyung Ae Choi  (Choi KA) 2 Articles
Alcohol Drinking Problems and Diabetes Self-care in Male Diabetics.
Soo Mi Jang, Kyung Ae Choi, Hyung Joon Yoo
Korean Diabetes J. 2004;28(2):139-148.   Published online April 1, 2004
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BACKGROUND
Heavy alcohol drinking negatively influences the self-care of diabetics requiring strict management of their lifestyle. However, related studies on the clinical interventions for diabetics with alcohol drinking problems are rare. Thus, the relationship between alcohol drinking problems and self-care of male diabetics was studied, and the physician's recognition of the drinking problems also evaluated. METHODS: The subjects of this study were 88 middle-aged male diabetics. They were selected from 4 general hospitals between Nov. 2001 and Feb. 2002. The subjects' alcohol drinking problems and degree of diabetes self-care were examined. Their charts were also reviewed for the physician's recognition of diabetic' alcohol related drinking problems. RESULT: Among the subjects, 53.4% were categorized as problem drinkers and 26% as alcohol dependent. Furthermore, 67.5% of diabetics with drinking problems had their alcohol drinking problems recognized by the physician. The mean self-care among diabetics with and without alcohol drinking problems were 15.0. The mean self-care among diabetics without alcohol drinking problems was 20.6(p<0.001). CONCLUSION: In this study, the importance of educator's sensitivity to diabetics' drinking problems and the use of screening tools to find alcohol drinking problems at an early stage have been highlighted. Further studies on the development of new program are suggested in order to effectively intervene in diabetics with alcohol drinking problems.
The Relation of Diabetes Control to Stress Amounts Associated with Life Events in Diabetics.
Jung Won Lim, Hyung Joon Yoo, Kyung Ae Choi, Sung Hee Lim, Yoo Sun Chung, Sung O Seo, Chul Su Choi, Hyun Kyu Kim, Jae Myung Yoo, Doo Man Kim, Moon Gi Choi, Sung Woo Park, Young Joong Cho
Korean Diabetes J. 2001;25(3):240-249.   Published online June 1, 2001
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
The life events which diabetic patients experience has an influence on conduct and communication pattern that is essential to control diabetes. The psychosocial life events which patients experienced in recently, as well as in the past has an important meanings in the process of the plan, implementation and evaluation of diabetic control. However, the most researches on this issues are scanty. Thus, we evaluated the relation of diabetic control to stress amounts associated with the life event which diabetic patients experience for the past one year. METHODS: In this study, 81 diabetic patients admitted to H hospital from March, 1999 to February 2000 were examined in stress amounts associated with life events, blood sugar, HbA1C, duration, complication, family history, treatment to inspect the hypothesis that stress experiences for recent 1 year are related to diabetic control. The 'Life Psychosocial Event Scale' invented by Lee was used. To examine the hypothesis that diabetic control may be influenced by the amount of stress, we investigated the difference of the means between the two groups (upper 30% of patients vs. lower 30% of patients) by T-test. RESULTS: The mean age was 56.9+/-15.1 years and the mean duration of diabetes was 8.9+/-7 years. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) was 200.3+/-71.0 mg/dL, PP2 was 292.9+/-87.2 mg/dL, HbA1C was 10.5+/-2.6%, complication was 0.8+/-0.9. The age showed negative correlation with stress amounts. The other variables did not show significant correlation with stress amounts. Thus, our study indicated that the hypothesis that stress experiences for recent 1 year are related to diabetic control was rejected. However, considering the perception-phenomenological approach on stress, if we study the relationship between stress with diabetic control inclusively, it seems that we can recognize such relationship. CONCLUSION: To address relation between stress with diabetic control inclusively, we need to consider stress factors in diversified aspects more than only one. Therefore, we must investigate how do patients perceive and cope with stress inclusively, because the crisis of life is influenced on the stress coping skill of patients. The study on this issue must be continued to identified the key factors associated with stress in diabetes.

Diabetes Metab J : Diabetes & Metabolism Journal