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Kyeong Soon Chang  (Chang KS) 2 Articles
The Status of Diabetes Mellitus and Effects of Related Factors on Heart Rate Variability in a Community.
Kyeong Soon Chang, Kwan Lee, Hyun Sul Lim
Korean Diabetes J. 2009;33(6):537-546.   Published online December 1, 2009
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2009.33.6.537
  • 1,749 View
  • 17 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
This study was performed to examine the status of diabetes mellitus (DM) in the community and effects of related factors on heart rate variability (HRV). METHODS: The author conducted HRV testing, a questionnaire survey, and blood chemistry analysis for fasting blood sugar (FBS) and HbA1c levels in 855 patients in a community over a period of 10 days, from August 14 to 25, 2006. The subjects were divided into a DM group and normal group by our study criteria. RESULTS: The proportion of DM was 12.6% and increased with old age. The mean measures of HRV (SDNN, Tp, Vlf, Lf, Hf, Lf/Hf) in the DM group were 22.7 (1.6) msec, 364.9 (2.7) msec2, 174.1 (3.0) msec2, 88.1 (3.2) msec2, 55.3 (3.2) msec2, and 1.6 (2.6), respectively, while those in the normal group were 32.2 (1.6) msec, 676.6 (2.8) msec2, 295.7 (3.1) msec2, 169.2 (3.4) msec2, 117.2 (3.2) msec2, and 1.4 (2.6), respectively. All parameters except for Lf/Hf were significantly lower in the DM group than in the normal group (P < 0.01). The Spearman's correlation coefficients between HRV and FBS or HbA1c were SDNN -0.222/-0.244 (P < 0.01), Tp -0.211/-0.212 (P < 0.01), Vlf -0.149/-0.132 (P < 0.01), Lf -0.188/-0.235 (P < 0.01), Hf -0.207/-0.204 (P < 0.01), and Lf/Hf (P > 0.05), respectively. CONCLUSION: This study shows that the DM group had a reduced HRV and increased pulse rate in comparison with the normal group. According to our results, the HRV test may be used accessorily for the early detection of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) and its related factors, as well as to prevent CAN.

Citations

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  • Psychophysiological Responses of Adults According to Cognitive Demand Levels for Horticultural Activities
    Seon-Ok Kim, Yun-Jin Kim, Sin-Ae Park
    Sustainability.2022; 14(14): 8252.     CrossRef
  • Physiological and psychological responses of humans to the index of greenness of an interior space
    Ji-Young Choi, Sin-Ae Park, Soo-Jin Jung, Ji-Young Lee, Ki-Cheol Son, Youn-Joo An, Sang-Woo Lee
    Complementary Therapies in Medicine.2016; 28: 37.     CrossRef
Glycemic Control and Health Behaviors through Diabetes Mellitus Education in a Clinic.
Kyeong Soon Chang, Kwan Lee, Hyun Sul Lim
Korean Diabetes J. 2006;30(1):73-81.   Published online January 1, 2006
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/jkda.2006.30.1.73
  • 1,523 View
  • 25 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
This study was carried out to examine the changes in the health behaviors and glycemic control before and after administering a Diabetes Mellitus (DM) education program in a clinic. METHODS: The author conducted a questionnaire and analyzed the blood chemistry with the fasting plasma blood sugar (FBS) and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level of 80 patients in a clinic for 6 months from February to July 2004. The study group was divided into a poorly controlled (PC) group and well-controlled (WC) group according to the FBS or HbA1c level. The author then educated the subjects about general knowledges for DM over a 6-month period. The changes in the results before and after the DM education were measured as the changes in the health behaviors along with the changes in the FBS, and HbA1c levels. RESULTS: The study subjects contained 20 males and 20 females in each groups, and the major age group was the fifth decade (22 cases, 27.5%). The mean values for the total health behavior scores after the DM education program in the PC and WC group were 16.2 +/- 1.9, and 16.2 +/- 1.7 respectively, and were significantly higher than that before the education program (11.4 +/- 2.1, 15.3 +/- 1.9, P < 0.05). The mean FBS levels after the DM education program in the PC and WC groups were 130.2 +/- 22.8 mg/dL, and 116.2 +/- 16.6 mg/dL respectively, and was significantly lower than that before the education program (186.3 +/- 33.5 mg/dL, 135.3 +/- 16.3 mg/dL, P < 0.05). The mean HbA1c levels after the DM education program in the PC and WC groups were 7.0 +/- 0.8%, and 6.2 +/- 0.4% respectively, which were significantly lower than that before the education program (9.2 +/- 1.4%, 6.5 +/- 0.4%, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: This study suggests that a DM education program in a clinic is effective in improving the health behaviors and laboratory findings in DM patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Economic Evaluation of Diabetes Education
    Jin-Won Noh, Young Dae Kwon, Jin-Hee Jung, Kang Hee Sim, Hee-Sook Kim, Minjae Choi, Jumin Park
    The Journal of Korean Diabetes.2015; 16(4): 293.     CrossRef
  • Group Classification on Management Behavior of Diabetic Mellitus
    Sung-Hong Kang, Soon-Ho Choi
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2011; 12(2): 765.     CrossRef
  • Effect on Glycemic, Blood Pressure, and Lipid Control according to Education Types
    Mi-Ju Choi, Seung-Hyun Yoo, Kum-Rae Kim, Yoo-Mi Bae, Sun-Hee Ahn, Seong-Shin Kim, Seong-Ah Min, Jin-Sun Choi, Seung-Eun Lee, Yeo-Jin Moon, Eun Jung Rhee, Cheol-Young Park, Won Young Lee, Ki Won Oh, Sung Woo Park, Sun Woo Kim
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2011; 35(6): 580.     CrossRef
  • The Effects of Regular Walking Exercise on Metabolic Syndrome, Cardiovascular Risk Factors, and Depressive Symptoms in the Elderly with Diabetic Mellitus
    Ki-Wol Sung, Ji-Hyun Lee
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2010; 21(4): 409.     CrossRef

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