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Hye Soo Kim  (Kim HS) 4 Articles
A Case of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy in a Girl with Type 1 DM .
Yi Sun Jang, Hye Soo Kim, Jong Min Lee
Korean Diabetes J. 2006;30(2):130-135.   Published online March 1, 2006
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/jkda.2006.30.2.130
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an immune-mediated disorder characterized by the symmetrical weakness in both proximal and distal muscles for at least 2 months, hyporeflexia or areflexia, nerve conduction abnormalities, and high CSF protein level. Diabetes mellitus, monoclonal gammopathy, hepatitis C infection, HIV infection, SLE, Sjogren syndrome and lymphoma have been associated with CIDP. The incidence of CIDP in diabetes is not known exactly, but occur more common among diabetic than nondiabetic patients. There is sometimes a difficulty in distinguishing between diabetic polyneuropathy and CIDP, but differential diagnosis is important because CIDP is treatable with immune-modulating therapy. We report a case of CIDP in 22-year-old girl with type 1 DM who presented with generalized motor weakness and walking disturbance which were treated with iv immunoglobulin
Comparison of the Relationship of Leptin to Metabolic Parameters Between Premenopausal Normal Weight and Obese Women.
Hee Kyoung Kim, Keun Gyu Park, Mi Kyung Kim, Young Yun Jang, Sang Yoon Kim, Eui Dal Jung, Hye Soo Kim, Ju Ho Do, In Kyu Lee
Korean Diabetes J. 2005;29(3):223-230.   Published online May 1, 2005
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Leptin is mainly secreted from adipose tissue, and it is a crucial factor for metabolic syndrome that is characterized by obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia. We measured the serum leptin concentrations and compared them with the body fat distribution and metabolic risk factors in premenopausal normal weight and obese women. METHODS: 231 premenopausal obese women participated in this study. The subjects were grouped based on their body mass index(BMI). The number of normal weight group women(BMI<25kg/m2) and the number of obese group women(BMI> or = 25kg/m2) were 90 and 141, respectively. We measured the plasma leptin concentration and such metabolic risk factors as fasting glucose, insulin, triglyceride(TG), systolic blood pressure(SBP) and diastolic blood pressure(DBP). The subcutaneous adipose tissue area(SAT) and the visceral adipose tissue area(VAT) were determined by computed tomography. The BMI, waist to hip ratio(WHR) and homeostasis model assessment(HOMA-IR) were calculated. RESULTS: In the obese group, the leptin levels were positively correlated with the BMI and SAT as well as with such metabolic risk factors as fasting serum glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, TG, SBP and DBP. Although leptin levels were positively correlated with BMI and SAT in the normal weight group, they were not correlated with the metabolic risk factors. CONCLUSION: The present study showed that the leptin levels in the normal weight group were not associated with the metabolic risk factors. Therefore, the degree of obesity must be considered before leptin can be used as a predictor for metabolic syndrome including diabetes and coronary heart disease
The Changes of Expression of Intermediate Flament in Pancreatic Duct Cells During Proliferation and Differentiation after 90% Pancreatectomy in Rats.
Seung Hyeon Ko, Kun Ho Yoon, Sun Hee Seo, Jung Min Lee, Ki Won Oh, Sang Ah Chang, Hye Soo Kim, Yoo Bae Ahn, Hyun Shik Son, Moo Il Kang, Bong Yun Cha, Kwang Woo Lee, Ho Young Son, Sung Koo Kang
Korean Diabetes J. 2000;24(2):191-201.   Published online January 1, 2001
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Neogenesis of the beta calls from ductal cells is the main mechanism of the increased beta cell mass after partial pancreatectomy. For the transdifferentiation from the duct cells to the beta cells, de-differentiation of the duct cells is needed because duct cells are also terminally differentiated cells already. But there was no clear evidence of de-differentiation of the duct cells during duct call proliferation so far. Herein we report the changes of intermediate filament protein expression in rapidly proliferating duct cells after partial pancreatectomy for the evidence of de-differentiation of the duct cells. METHODS: 45 week-old Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 80~120 g were used. 90% partial pancreatectomy was done. Experimental animals were divided into 5 subgroups by date of killing after surgery: 1, 3, 7, 14, 30 days, Pancreas remnant was excised and immunohistochemical stain was done for pancytokeratin (Pan-CK) as a epithelial cell marker and vimentin (VT) as a mesenchymal cell marker. We observed the double stained slide with pan-CK and VT antibody using confocal microscope for costaining analysis over time. The sections were also immunostained with anti-insulin antibody for the quantification of the beta cell mass by point-counting methods. RESULTS: We observed impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes were developed affer 90% pancreatectomy. Significant increase of the weight of pancreatic remnant, beta cell and duct cell mass were observed about 14 days after pancreatectomy. We observed the co-expression of VT and pan-CK intermediate filament protein in rapidly proliferating duct cells in the area of common pancreatic duct and main duct at one day after partial pancreatectomy. 3 days affer partial pancreatectomy, VT and pan-CK costained duct cells were mainly observed in the rageneration focus of the duct cell proliferation. 30 days after partial pancreatectomy, we could not find any costaining duct calls in the remnant pancreas. CONCLUSION: The vimentin intermediate filament, a marker of mesenchymal cell was expressed in proliferating ductal cells after pancreatectomy. We could suspect that pancytokeratin and vimentin co-expression is a good marker for de-differentiation of proliferating duct cells.
Effect of Oxidezed LDL in Insulin Binding, Internalization and Recycling of Insulin Receptor in Cultured Bovine Aortic Endothelial Cells.
Sung Dae Moon, Bong Yun Cha, Hye Soo Kim, Sang Ah Jang, Yu Bae An, Ki Ho Song, Je Ho Han, Soon Jib You, Kun Ho Yoon, Moo Il Kang, Kwang Woo Lee, Ho Young Son, Sung Koo Kang
Korean Diabetes J. 1999;23(3):243-255.   Published online January 1, 2001
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Endothelial dysfunction is perhaps one of the earliest manifestations of atherosclerosis. This abnormality is in part due to altered membrane signal transduction in endothelial cells. Oxidized LDL that is atherogenic may induce endothelial dysfunction, and its presence has been documented in atherosclerotic vessels. Many studies have shown that oxidized LDL inhibits signaling pathways mediated by inhibitory GTP-binding proteins (Gi- protein). It is also known that G-protein is involved in insulin recycling on cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Therefore, to determine the effect of oxidized LDL on endothelial cells: insulin binding, internalization, and the recycling of insulin receptors were assessed in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells treated with native LDL, oxidized LDL, and in some cells pretreated with pertussis toxin before the incubation with oxidized LDL. METHOD: Native LDL (density 1.019 1.063 g/mL) was obtained from using the rapid single discontinuous density gradient ultracentrifugation of plasma samples from a single donor. Oxidized LDL was prepared by exposing samples of native LDL to CuSO4 (5 uM) at 37't for 24 hours. Endothelial cells at 80% confluence were treated with the indicated concentrations of native LDL, oxidized LDL, and some cells were pretreated with pertussis toxin for 6 hrs before the incubation with oxidized LDL. These cells were incubated for 24 72 hours. RESULTS: 1. Binding of (125)I-insulin(0.17nM) to endothelial cells treated with increasing concentrations of oxidized LDL shows dose-dependent decrease. There were significant differences in insulin binding between native LDL and oxidized LDL-treated cells (p<0.05). Binding of 'I-insulin (0.17 nM) to endothelial cells treated with increasing culture time of oxidized LDL shows more decreased than that of native LDL significantly (p<0.05). And oxidized LDL had additive effect, but not significant, with pertussis toxin on the specific (125)I-insulin binding to bovine aortic endothelial cells. 2. Internalization of insulin receptors reached rapidly to its maximal level around 30min at 37'C. At 60 min, oxidized-LDL treated cells was less increased in internalization of insulin receptors than that of native LDL treated cells [59.1+1.9% of total cell associated insulin (mean+SE) vs. 67.5+1.1%, p<0.05]. There were additive effects, but not significant differences, between oxidized LDL and pretreated with pertussis toxin before the incubation with oxidized LDL. 3. After 30 min of incubation with unlabeled insulin (33 nM), insulin binding in oxidized LDL treated cells was significantly higher compared to native LDL treated cells (69.0+2.5% of control values vs. 63.7+1.2%, p<0.05), suggesting that oxidized-LDL decreased internalization of insulin receptors. And during the process of recycling, there were significant differences in insulin receptor recycling between the oxidized LDL and native LDL treated cells, but oxidized LDL had an additive effect, but not significant, with pertussis toxin on insulin receptor recycling to the bovine aortic endothelial cells. CONCLUSION: 1. The findings in this study suggest that oxidized LDL may play a causative role to produce the insulin resistance by inhibiting insulin binding, internalization and recycling of insulin receptor in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells 2. This study suggests that the effect of oxidized LDL to the bovine aortic endothelial cells in insulin binding and receptor-mediated transcytosis is caused by inhibiting pertussis toxin sensitive Gi-protein.

Diabetes Metab J : Diabetes & Metabolism Journal