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Hong Je Park  (Park HJ) 3 Articles
Common Genetic Polymorphisms in the Promoter of Resistin Gene are Major Determinants of Plasma Resistin Concentrations in Humans.
Young Min Cho, Byung Soo Youn, Sung Soo Chung, Ki Woo Kim, Bo Kyeong Koo, Kang Yeol Yu, Hong Je Park, Hyoung Doo Shin, Hak Chul Jang, Kyong Soo Park, Seong Yeon Kim, Hong Kyu Lee
Korean Diabetes J. 2004;28(1):9-19.   Published online February 1, 2004
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BACKGROUND
Resistin has been postulated to be an important link between obesity and insulin resistance. Genetic polymorphisms in the resistin gene promotor have been suggested as a determinant of the expression of resistin mRNA, which is possibly associated with obesity and insulin resistance. In this study, the association between the genotype of the resistin promoter, and its plasma concentrations, were investigated. METHODS: The g.-537A>C and g.-420C>G polymorphisms in the resistin promoter were examined, and the levels of plasma resistin measured in the Korean subjects, both with and without type 2 diabetes. Haplotype-based promoter activity and the gel electrophoretic mobility-shift assays(EMSA) were also performed. RESULTS: The -420G and the -537A alleles, which were in linkage disequilibrium, were associated with higher plasma resistin concentrations. Individuals with the A-G(-537 A and -420G) haplotypes showed significantly higher plasma resistin levels than those that did not. The haplotypes A-G had modestly increased promoter activities compared to the other haplotypes. The EMSA revealed the -420 G allele to be specific for binding of the nuclear proteins from adipocytes and monocytes. However, neither polymorphism was associated with type 2 diabetes or obesity in our study subjects. CONCLUSION: Polymorphisms in the promoter of the resistin gene are major determinants of plasma resistin concentrations in humans
The Effects of Insulin Sensitizers on the Plasma Concentrations of Adipokines in Type 2 Diabetic Patients.
Hye Seung Jung, Young Min Cho, Kyung Won Kim, Byung Soo Youn, Kang Yeol Yu, Hong Je Park, Chan Soo Shin, Seong Yeon Kim, Hong Kyu Lee, Kyong Soo Park
Korean Diabetes J. 2003;27(6):476-489.   Published online December 1, 2003
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BACKGROUND
Resistin, leptin and adiponectin are proteins secreted from adipose tissue, and have been suggested to play roles in insulin sensitivity. The effects of the circulating levels of two different types of insulin sensitizer, rosiglitazone and metformin, in type 2 diabetic patients were examined to elucidate the relationship between adipokines and insulin resistance. METHODS: Thirty type 2 diabetic patients, who showed poor glycemic control when administered 4 mg glimepiride a day, without severe diabetic complications or medical illness, were randomized to receive an additional 4mg rosiglitazone or 1000 mg metformin a day. The plasma resistin, leptin and adiponectin concentrations were measured at the baseline and after 6 months of treatment. The anthropometric parameters, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1C, total cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL-cholesterol and free fatty acids were also measured. Certain single nucleotide polymorphisms of adipokine genes were also identified. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the reductions of the plasma glucose and HbA1C levels, after 6 months of treatment, between the two groups. The plasma resistin concentrations decreased, the adiponectin significantly increased and the leptin showed a tendency to increase in the rosiglitazone group. In the metformin group, only the resistin concentration significantly increased. However, the changes in the adipokines did not correlate with the HOMA-IR in either group. The reduction in the HbA1C due to rosiglitazone was greater if the initial leptin level was high, if there was a G allele on the -420th locus of the resistin gene, or the 45th locus of the APM1 (adiponectin gene) was the T-homozygote or there was a T allele on the 276th locus of the APM1. Those due to metfromin were greater with high initial adiponectin levels. CONCLUSION: In type 2 diabetic patients, showing poor glycemic control with sulfonylurea therapy, rosiglitazone or metformin treatment changed some of the adipokine concentrations, but these changes were not clearly related with insulin resistance. Polymorphisms of certain adipokine genes seem to have a relation to the susceptibility of rosiglitazone.
Genetic Association of Adiponectin Polymorphisms with Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.
Yun Yong Lee, Nam Seok Lee, Young Min Cho, Min Kyong Moon, Hye Seung Jung, Young Joo Park, Hong Je Park, Byoung Soo Youn, Hong Kyu Lee, Kyong Soo Park, Hyoung Doo Shin
Korean Diabetes J. 2003;27(6):438-448.   Published online December 1, 2003
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Adiponectin, an adipocyte-secreted protein, is known to modulate insulin sensitivity, glucose homeostasis and the development of atherosclerosis. Recently, several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the adiponectin gene have been reported to be associated with type 2 diabetes and components of the insulin resistance syndrome. METHODS: The frequencies of SNP T45G and G276T of the adiponectin gene was examined in 493 unrelated type 2 diabetic and 136 non-diabetic control Korean subjects. The clinical characteristics and plasma adiponectin levels of the subjects were compared within these genotypes. RESULTS: The T allele at SNP45 was significantly more frequent in the type 2 diabetes than in the control subjects (71.6 vs. 64.3%, p=0.013). The subjects with the G/G genotype of SNP45 were at reduced risk for type 2 diabetes (OR: 0.495, 95% CI 0.246-0.995, p=0.048) compared with those having the T/T genotype. However, there were no statistically significant differences in allele the frequencies (G frequency in the control vs. the diabetic group 73.9 vs. 68.9%, p=0.106) and genotype frequencies at SNP276 between groups. The subjects with the T/T genotype at SNP45 had higher a body mass index (24.6+/- 3.1 vs. 24.1+/-2.8 kg/m2, p=0.036) and serum triglyceride levels (2.03+/-1.31 vs. 1.87+/-1.38 mmol/1, p=0.041) than the T/G+G/G genotypes in the diabetic group. Those with the T/T genotype also had lower plasma adiponectin levels than those without T/T genotype at SNP45 in the control group (6.11+/-3.10 vs. 8.24+/-4.24 g/mL, p=0.043). There was a similar trend in diabetic group, but this did not reach statistical significance (4.32+/-2.81 vs. 4.96+/-3.26 g/mL, p=0.097). The SNP276 had no association with the clinical features of insulin resistance or plasma adiponectin level. CONCLUSION: The T/T genotype of SNP45 in the adiponectin gene was associated with a low adiponectin level, high body mass index, the serum triglyceride level and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The SNP276 in the adiponectin gene may not be an important determinant of insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes in Korean subjects.

Diabetes Metab J : Diabetes & Metabolism Journal