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Hae Jin Kim  (Kim HJ) 16 Articles
Effects of Adding omega-3 Fatty Acids to Simvastatin on Lipids, Lipoprotein Size and Subspecies in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Hypertriglyceridemia.
Won Jun Kim, Chang Beom Lee, Cheol Young Park, Se Eun Park, Eun Jung Rhee, Won Young Lee, Ki Won Oh, Sung Woo Park, Dae Jung Kim, Hae Jin Kim, Seung Jin Han, Hong Keum Cho
Korean Diabetes J. 2009;33(6):494-502.   Published online December 1, 2009
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2009.33.6.494
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
omega-3 fatty acids are known to improve lipid profiles, the distribution of lipoprotein subclasses, and secondary prevention against post-myocardial infarction. Rare reports have emerged of synergistic results of omega-3 fatty acids with simvastatin in cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus with hypertriglyceridemia. The purpose of this study was to determine the combined relationship of omega-3 fatty acids plus simvastatin on lipid, lipoprotein size and the types of subspecies. METHODS: This randomized, multi-center, comparison study evaluated eight weeks of combination therapy (omega-3 fatty acids (Omacor) 4 g/day plus simvastatin 20 mg/day) or monotherapy (simvastatin 20 mg/day) for at least six weeks in 62 diabetic patients. Subjects with a triglyceride concentration of more than 200 mg/dL were eligible for inclusion. RESULTS: No significant differences for omega-3 fatty acids + simvastatin versus simvastatin alone were observed for triglycerides (-22.7% vs. -14.3%, P = 0.292), HDL peak particle size (+2.8% vs. -0.4%, P = 0.076), LDL mean particle size (+0.4% vs -0.1%, P = 0.376) or LDL subspecies types, although the combination therapy showed a tendency toward lower triglycerides, larger HDL, and LDL particle sizes than did the monotherapy. There were no significant differences between the two groups in regard to HDL-C, LDL-C, or HbA1c levels. There were no serious adverse events and no abnormalities in the laboratory values associated with this study. CONCLUSION: omega-3 fatty acids were a safeform of treatment in hypertriglyceridemic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. But, regarding efficacy, a much larger sample size and longer-term follow-up may be needed to distinguish between the effects of combination therapy and monotherapy.
Cause-of-Death Trends for Diabetes Mellitus over 10 Years (Korean Diabetes J 33(1):65-72, 2009).
Hae Jin Kim
Korean Diabetes J. 2009;33(2):164-165.   Published online April 1, 2009
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2009.33.2.164
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AbstractAbstract PDF
No abstract available.
Effect of Valsartan on Blood Pressure and Urinary Albumin Excretion in Hypertensive Type 2 Diabetic Patients: An Open-Label, Multicenter Study.
Se Jun Park, Dae Jung Kim, Hae Jin Kim, Soo Yeon Park, Ji A Seo, Nan Hee Kim, Sung Hee Choi, Soo Lim, Hak Chul Jang, Seung Hyun Ko, Ki Ho Song, Yu Bae Ahn, Soo Kyoung Kim, Yong Wook Cho, Jun Goo Kang, Sung Hee Ihm, Cheol Young Park, Sung Woo Park, Dong Hyun Shin, Yong Hyun Kim, Kwan Woo Lee
Korean Diabetes J. 2008;32(6):513-521.   Published online December 1, 2008
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2008.32.6.513
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Activation of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been an important mechanism of microvascular and macrovascular complications in diabetic patients. It has been reported that RAS blockades reduce the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether valsartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), reduced blood pressure and urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER) in hypertensive type 2 diabetic patients. METHOD: Three hundred forty-seven hypertensive type 2 diabetic patients who had not taken angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or ARB for 6 months prior to this study were enrolled. We measured blood pressure and UAER before and after 24 weeks of valsartan treatment. RESULT: Baseline mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure was 143 +/- 15 and 87 +/- 11 mmHg, respectively and the median albumin excretion rate was 27 ug/mg. Reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure was 16 mmHg/10 mmHg and the median UAER was 19.3 ug/mg after 24 weeks (P < 0.01, respectively). When we divided the subjects into three groups according to the UAER (normoalbuminuria, microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria), significant changes were reported in the microalbuminuria and the macroalbuminuria groups. Thirty-eight (42%) patients with microalbuminuria improved to normoalbuminuria and twelve (41%) patients with macroalbuminuria improved to microalbuminuria. We found an association between the improvement of blood pressure and UAER (R = 0.165, P = 0.015). CONCLUSION: We concluded that valsartan reduces urinary albumin excretion and blood pressure in hypertensive type 2 diabetic patients.
An Analysis of Medical Costs of Diabetic Patients in a University Hospital (1996~2005).
Ki Hong Chun, Kwan Woo Lee, Dae Jung Kim, Hae Jin Kim, Kyung Won Paek, Soo Jin Lee
Korean Diabetes J. 2008;32(4):366-376.   Published online August 1, 2008
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2008.32.4.366
  • 2,241 View
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  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
The aim of this research was to find out the costs of diabetes, as research in a prospective cohort study looking into the development of diabetic complications followed by treatment intervention by a medical institution. The research compared the changes in medical costs by following-up on the treatment details of diagnosed diabetes for the last 10 years in a university hospital. METHODS: The research used data of outpatient, inpatient, pharmaceutical and total medical costs, from 1996 to 2005, of individual patients who were diagnosed with diabetic patients, to analyze the outpatient and inpatient total medical cost changes over the years. RESULTS: After antidiabetic drug, in the case of outpatient treatment, pharmaceutical costs increased on average by about 25,000 won a month for diabetic patients without complications and by 35,000 won for diabetic patients with microvascular complications. Outpatient medical costs were affected after drug treatment by as much of an increase as created by the pharmaceutical costs. The total medical costs, that is the sum of inpatient and outpatient costs, decreased by 30~40% compared to that before drug treatment. In the case of total medical cost, MI or ESRD cost 2~3 times more in pharmaceutical costs than before the development of complications. The total medical costs of diabetic patients with CVA, MI and ESRD complications increased in the first year after development of the complication, and this was followed by a decrease in the next year, showing a tendency to remain constant with no increase or decrease over subsequent years. This means that the total medical costs of patients with complications remain continuously large throughout the life of the diagnosed patient. CONCLUSION: For diabetic patients, pharmaceutical costs are the most important factor in determining outpatient medical costs.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Outcome Research in Diabetes
    Kwan Woo Lee
    Journal of Korean Diabetes.2011; 12(1): 2.     CrossRef
  • Costs of Diabetes Mellitus in Korea
    Kwan Woo Lee
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2011; 35(6): 567.     CrossRef
Clinical Characteristics and Direct Medical Costs of Type 2 Diabetic Patients.
Eun Joon Moon, Young Eun Jo, Tae Chin Park, Yun Kyung Kim, Sun Hye Jung, Hae Jin Kim, Dae Jung Kim, Yoon Sok Chung, Kwan Woo Lee
Korean Diabetes J. 2008;32(4):358-365.   Published online August 1, 2008
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2008.32.4.358
  • 2,416 View
  • 37 Download
  • 15 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Type 2 diabetes mellitus is an expensive chronic metabolic disorder and its prevalence has been increasing rapidly in South Korea, owing to a westernized lifestyle. We analyzed the annual direct medical costs attributable to type 2 diabetes and its chronic complications in Korea retrospectively. METHODS: We randomly selected 1,051 patients with type 2 diabetes who visited Ajou University Hospital as an outpatient in 2005. Clinical characteristics, duration of diabetes, and microvascular and macrovascular complications were assessed from a medical chart review. The annual direct medical costs included insurance covered and uncovered medical costs. RESULTS: Of the 1,051 patients with type 2 diabetes, 48.2% had at least one microvascular complication, 5.6% had at least one macrovascular complication, and 12.4% of the patients had both microvascular and macrovascular complications. The average annual direct medical cost was found to be 3,348,488won per patient. In patients with microvascular complications, the total cost of management was increased 1.4 times compared to those without complications. Direct medical costs for patients with macrovascular complications were 2.1-fold as high as patients with no complications. Those patients with both microvascular and macrovascular complications, increased costs by 3.1-fold over those without complications. CONCLUSION: Chronic complications have a substantial impact on the direct medical costs of type 2 diabetes. The prevention of chronic diabetic complications will not only influence the mortality and morbidity of patients with type 2 diabetes, but also potentially reduce medical costs.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Importance of family history of diabetes in computing a diabetes risk score in Korean prediabetic population
    Morena Ustulin, Sang Youl Rhee, Suk Chon, Kyu Keung Ahn, Ji Eun Lim, Bermseok Oh, Sung-Hoon Kim, Sei Hyun Baik, Yongsoo Park, Moon Suk Nam, Kwan Woo Lee, Young Seol Kim, Jeong-Taek Woo
    Scientific Reports.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Features of Long-Standing Korean Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients with Diabetic Retinopathy: A Study Based on Standardized Clinical Data
    Sejeong Park, Sang Youl Rhee, Su Jin Jeong, Kiyoung Kim, Suk Chon, Seung-Young Yu, Jeong-Taek Woo
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2017; 41(5): 393.     CrossRef
  • Association between Sleep Duration and Impaired Fasting Glucose in Korean Adults: Results from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011–2012
    Cho-Rong Kim, Yun-Mi Song, Jin-Young Shin, Wook Gim
    Korean Journal of Family Medicine.2016; 37(1): 51.     CrossRef
  • Trends in the Diabetes Epidemic in Korea
    Kyoung Hwa Ha, Dae Jung Kim
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2015; 30(2): 142.     CrossRef
  • Economic Evaluation of Diabetes Education
    Jin-Won Noh, Young Dae Kwon, Jin-Hee Jung, Kang Hee Sim, Hee-Sook Kim, Minjae Choi, Jumin Park
    The Journal of Korean Diabetes.2015; 16(4): 293.     CrossRef
  • Association between diabetes-related factors and clinical periodontal parameters in type-2 diabetes mellitus
    Eun-Kyong Kim, Sang Gyu Lee, Youn-Hee Choi, Kyu-Chang Won, Jun Sung Moon, Anwar T Merchant, Hee-Kyung Lee
    BMC Oral Health.2013;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Cytoprotective Effect of Ethanol Extract from Maesil (Prunus mume Sieb. et Zucc.) on Alloxan-induced Oxidative Damage in Pancreatic-cell, HIT-T15
    In-Hye Kim, Jong-Bae Kim, Kang-Jin Cho, Jae-Hyun Kim, Ae-Son Om
    Korean Journal of Plant Resources.2012; 25(2): 184.     CrossRef
  • The Protective Effects of Chrysanthemum cornarium L. var. spatiosum Extract on HIT-T15 Pancreatic β-Cells against Alloxan-induced Oxidative Stress
    In-Hye Kim, Kang-Jin Cho, Jeong-Sook Ko, Jae-Hyun Kim, Ae-Son Om
    The Korean Journal of Food And Nutrition.2012; 25(1): 123.     CrossRef
  • Outcome Research in Diabetes
    Kwan Woo Lee
    Journal of Korean Diabetes.2011; 12(1): 2.     CrossRef
  • Costs of Diabetes Mellitus in Korea
    Kwan Woo Lee
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2011; 35(6): 567.     CrossRef
  • The Epidemiology of Diabetes in Korea
    Dae Jung Kim
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2011; 35(4): 303.     CrossRef
  • The Hypoglycemic Effect of Complex of Chinese Traditional Herbs (CTH) and Macelignan in Type 2 Diabetic Animal Model

    Journal of Life Science.2010; 20(7): 1113.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiologic Characteristics of Diabetes Mellitus in Korea: Current Status of Diabetic Patients Using Korean Health Insurance Database
    Ie Byung Park, Sei Hyun Baik
    Korean Diabetes Journal.2009; 33(5): 357.     CrossRef
  • Management of Diabetic Mellitus in Low-income Rural Patients
    Hye-Yeon Kim, Woo-Jun Yun, Min-Ho Shin, Sun-Seong Kweon, Hye-Ran Ahn, Seong-Woo Choi, Young-Hoon Lee, Dong-Hyeok Cho, Jung-Ae Rhee
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2009; 42(5): 315.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Pancreatic Cancer in Diabetics and Clinical Characteristics of Diabetes-associated with Pancreatic Cancer - Comparison between Diabetes with and without Pancreatic Cancer -
    Seung Goun Hong, Jae Seon Kim, Sung Joo Jung, Moon Kyung Joo, Beom Jae Lee, Jong Eun Yeon, Jong-Jae Park, Kwan Soo Byun, Young-Tae Bak
    The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology.2009; 54(3): 167.     CrossRef
Direct Medical Costs of Type 2 Diabetic Patients in the Tertiary Hospital.
Joo An Hwang, Tae Chin Park, Sun Hye Jung, Hae Jin Kim, Dae Jung Kim, So Hun Kim, Moon Suk Nam, Tae Hyun Kim, Moon Kyu Lee, Kwan Woo Lee
Korean Diabetes J. 2008;32(3):259-268.   Published online June 1, 2008
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2008.32.3.259
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  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common, chronic and costly disease. Its prevalence is rapidly increasing worldwide. Diabetes has big economic burden mainly because of its chronic complications. We analyzed the annual direct medical costs of type 2 diabetic patients, including the costs associated with its complications in Korea retrospectively. METHODS: We enrolled 531 type 2 diabetic patients who had been treated in the 3 Tertiary Hospital in 2005. Clinical characteristics, duration of diabetes, modality of glycemic control, and presence of microvascular and macrovascular complications were assessed by the review of medical records. The annual direct medical costs were assessed using the hospital electronic database and included insurance covered and uncovered medical costs. RESULTS: The annual direct medical costs of type 2 diabetic patients without any complications was 1,184,563 won (95% CI for mean: 973,006~1,396,121 won). Compared to diabetic patients without complications, annual total medical costs increased 4.7-fold, 10.7-fold, and 8.8-fold in patients with microvascular complications, macrovascular complications and both complications, respectively. Hospitalization costs largely increased by 78.7-fold and 61.0-fold in patients with macrovascular complications and both complications, respectively. Major complications to increase medical costs were kidney transplantation (23.1-fold), dialysis (21.0-fold), PTCA or CABG (12.4-fold), and leg amputation (11.8-fold). The total medical costs dramatically increased according to the stage of diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy. CONCLUSION: Diabetic complications have a substantial impact on the direct medical costs of type 2 diabetic patients. The prevention of diabetic complications will benefit the patients as well as the overall healthcare expenditures.

Citations

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  • Policy Proposals for Infection Control in Patients with Chronic Wounds
    Kyung-Chul Moon, Donghyeok Shin, Kyu-Won Baek, Changsik John Pak, Young-Joon Jun
    Journal of Wound Management and Research.2022; 18(3): 249.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Co‐administration of Sulfonylureas and Antimicrobial Drugs on Hypoglycemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Using a Case‐Crossover Design
    Sera Lee, Miyoung Ock, Hun‐Sung Kim, Hyunah Kim
    Pharmacotherapy: The Journal of Human Pharmacology and Drug Therapy.2020; 40(9): 902.     CrossRef
  • The effect of continuity of care on the incidence of end-stage renal disease in patients with newly detected type 2 diabetic nephropathy: a retrospective cohort study
    Yun Jung Jang, Yoon Soo Choy, Chung Mo Nam, Ki Tae Moon, Eun-Cheol Park
    BMC Nephrology.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Social Welfare Information for Patients with Diabetes Mellitus
    Jea Yeon Lee
    The Journal of Korean Diabetes.2016; 17(2): 117.     CrossRef
  • Hypoglycemia and Health Costs
    Yong-ho Lee, Gyuri Kim, Eun Seok Kang
    The Journal of Korean Diabetes.2016; 17(1): 11.     CrossRef
  • Outcome Research in Diabetes
    Kwan Woo Lee
    Journal of Korean Diabetes.2011; 12(1): 2.     CrossRef
  • Costs of Diabetes Mellitus in Korea
    Kwan Woo Lee
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2011; 35(6): 567.     CrossRef
  • How Much Amount of Socioeconomic Loss Is Caused by Digestive Diseases?
    Kyung Sik Park
    The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology.2011; 58(6): 297.     CrossRef
The Plasma Adiponectin Levels in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes.
Hae Jin Kim
Korean Diabetes J. 2008;32(1):83-83.   Published online February 1, 2008
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2008.32.1.83
  • 1,797 View
  • 16 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
No abstract available.
Effects of PPAR-alpha and-gamma Agonists on Fatty Acid Metabolism of Muscle Cells in Hyperlipidemic and Hyperglycemic Conditions.
Yong jik Lee, Zheng Shan Zhao, Soo Kyung Kim, Hae Jin Kim, Wan Sub Shim, Chul Woo Ahn, Hyun Chul Lee, Bong Soo Cha
Korean Diabetes J. 2006;30(5):324-335.   Published online September 1, 2006
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/jkda.2006.30.5.324
  • 2,075 View
  • 24 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Studies for the regulation of fatty acid metabolism are deficient relatively in skeletal muscle and heart. The investigations in pathological conditions for malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD) and for the relation of MCD and PPAR-alpha.-gamma agonists are insufficient in particular. METHODS: In the current study, fully differentiated H9c2 muscle cells were exposed to pathological conditions such as hyperlipidemic (0.1 mM Palmitate) and hyperglycemic (16.5 mM Glucose) condition with 5 uM PPAR-gamma agonist (rosiglitazone) and 10 uM PPAR-alpha agonist (WY14,643) and then experiments such as MCD activity assay, MCD real-time RT-PCR, MCD reporter gene assay, MCD Western blotting, PPAR-alpha Western blotting, and palmitate oxidation test were carried out. RESULTS: Only PPAR-alpha agonist increased MCD activity. In the result of real-time RT-PCR, both PPAR-alpha and PPAR-gamma agonists elevated MCD mRNA expression in hyperlipidemic condition. MCD protein expression was decreased in hyperlipidemic condition, however, increased in rosiglitazone, or WY14,643 treated conditions. Rosiglitazone, and WY14,643 treated groups showed incresed MCD protein expression in hyperglycemic condition. Hyperlipidemic control group and PPAR-alpha.-gamma agonists treated groups presented about 3.8 times more increased palmitate oxidation level than normolipidemic control group in hyperlipidemic condition. PPAR-alpha agonist treated group showed 49% more increased palmitate oxidation rate than hyperlipidemic control group in primary cultured rat skeletal muscle cells. The amount of palmitate oxidation from differentiated H9c2 muscle cells that had overexpressed PPAR-alpha structural genes was more increased than control group. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that PPAR-alpha agonist ameliorates the defects induced by hyperlipidemic condition through the regulation of MCD. In summary, a closely reciprocal relation among PPAR-alpha agonist, MCD, and fatty acid oxidation existed distinctly in hyperlipidemic condition, but not in hyperglycemic condition.

Citations

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  • Beneficial effect of Combination with Korean Red Ginseng and Morus alba in metabolic syndrome
    Yun Jung Lee, Hye Yoom Kim, Jung Joo Yoon, So Min Lee, You Mee Ahn, Joung Hyun Kho, Min Chul Kho, Ho Sub Lee, Kyung Min Choi, Dae Gill Kang
    The Korea Journal of Herbology.2012; 27(6): 99.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Mixed Extract from Lycium chinense, Cordyceps militaris, and Acanthopanax senticosus on Glucose-Regulating Enzymes of HepG2 in Hyperglycemic Conditions
    Dae-Jung Kim, Jeong-Mi Kim, Tae-Hyuk Kim, Jong-Mi Baek, Hyun-Sook Kim, Myeon Choe
    Journal of the Korean Society of Food Science and Nutrition.2010; 39(9): 1257.     CrossRef
The Relationship between Visceral & Subcutaneous Fat and Small Dense Low Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Concentration in Type 2 Diabetic Patients.
Wan Sub Shim, Soo Kyung Kim, Hae Jin Kim, Eun Seok Kang, Chul Woo Ahn, Sung Kil Lim, Hyun Chul Lee, Bong Soo Cha
Korean Diabetes J. 2006;30(3):207-216.   Published online May 1, 2006
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/jkda.2006.30.3.207
  • 2,084 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Visceral obesity is closely associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Small dense (sd) LDL is closely associated with CVD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between visceral and subcutaneous fat accumulation and sd LDL-C concentration. METHODS: 264 type 2 diabetic patients underwent ultrasonography to estimate visceral & subcutaneous fat accumulation and sd LDL-C concentrations were measured. RESULTS: BMI, total cholesterol, sd LDL-C concentration and percentage of sd LDL-C were higher in highest tertile of visceral fat length in male than those in lowest tertile. BMI, total cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL-C, sd LDL-C concentration and percentage of sd LDL-C were higher in highest tertile of visceral fat length in female than those in lowest tertile. But sd LDL-C concentration and percentage of sd LDL-C were not different among three groups based on the tertile of subcutaneous fat length in male and female. Visceral fat length was correlated with sd LDL-C concentration and percentage of sd LDL-C, total cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL-C, but negatively with percentage of large buoyant LDL-C and HDL-C after adjustment of age, sex and BMI. Subcutaneous fat length was not correlated with sd LDL-C and percentage of sd LDL-C, total cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL-C and LDL-C. CONCLUSION: The association between visceral fat length and sd LDL-C could be a factor that explains the association between visceral obesity and CVD.
The long term effects of rosiglitazone on serum lipid concentration and body weight.
Wan Sub Shim, Mi Young Do, Soo Kyung Kim, Hae Jin Kim, Kyu Yeon Hur, Eun Seok Kang, Yu Mie Rhee, Chul Woo Ahn, Sung Kil Lim, Kyung Rae Kim, Hyun Chul Lee, Bong Soo Cha
Korean Diabetes J. 2006;30(1):17-24.   Published online January 1, 2006
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/jkda.2006.30.1.17
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Although rosiglitazone, an insulin sensitizer, is known to have beneficial effects on high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration and low density lipoprotein (LDL) particle size, it has adverse effects on the increment of total cholesterol (TC) and LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), and body weight in some studies. Such adverse effects of rosiglitazone on the serum lipid profiles and body weight seem to be attributed to the fact that most studies with rosiglitazone are limited to a short period of follow up. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long term effects of rosiglitazone on the serum lipid levels and body weight. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We prospectively evaluated fasting serum glucose, HbA1c, TC, LDL-C, triglyceride, HDL-C and body weight at baseline and every three months after rosiglitazone usage (4mg/d) in 202 type 2 diabetic patients. RESULTS: TC levels had increased maximally at 3 months and thereafter decreased, but were significantly higher at 18 months than those at baseline. LDL-C levels from the first 3 months to 12 months were significantly higher than those at baseline, but after 15 months, LDL-C concentration was not significantly different from the basal LDL-C concentration. HDL-C levels had increased after first 3 months and the increment of HDL-C concentration were maintained. The increment of HDL-C was more prominent in patients with low basal HDL-C concentration than in patients with high basal HDL-C concentration. Body weight from 3 months to 18 months were higher than that at baseline, but after 3 months, body weight did not increase furthermore significantly. CONCLUSIONS: The adverse effects on lipid concentration and body weight of rosiglitazone may attenuate after long term usage of rosiglitazone.
The Relationship between Metabolic Syndrome and Small Dense Low Density Lipoprotein-Cholesterol.
Wan Sub Shim, Hae Jin Kim, Eun Seok Kang, Yu Mie Rhee, Chul Woo Ahn, Sung Kil Lim, Hyun Chul Lee, Bong Soo Cha
Korean Diabetes J. 2005;29(6):548-556.   Published online November 1, 2005
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome (MS) are associated with the increased risk of cardiovascular disease and with characteristic dyslipidemia which is composed of high level of triglyceride, low level of HDL-C and increased small dense LDL (sd-LDL). Recently a simple method was established for the quantification of sd-LDL-C using heparin-magnesium precipitation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the sd-LDL-C and the number of components of MS in type 2 diabetic patients. METHODS: 287 type 2 diabetic patients, who did not use the medication which can affect the concentration of lipid such as statin, fibrate, thiazolidinediones and corticosteroid, were enrolled. The NCEP-ATP III criteria of MS were used except obesity. RESULTS: Although LDL-C concentrations were not changed according to the number of components of MS, absolute level and percentage of sd-LDL-C were increased. Although LDL-C concentrations were not different between presence and absence of MS, in the case of MS, absolute level and percentage of sd-LDL-C were higher than not in the case of MS. Sd-LDL-C concentration was positively correlated with fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, total cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL-C and percentage of sd-LDL-C, and negatively with HDL-C. The percentage of sd-LDL-C was positively correlated with total cholesterol, triglyceride and sd-LDL-C, and negatively with HDL-C. CONCLUSION: The sd-LDL-C may a factor that explains the higher risk of CVD in diabetic patients with the MS.
The Association of Family History of Diabetes and Obesity in the Development of Type 2 Diabetes.
Wan Sub Shim, Hae Jin Kim, Soo Kyung Kim, Seung Jin Han, Eun Seok Kang, Yu Mie Rhee, Chul Woo Ahn, Sung Kil Lim, Kyung Rae Kim, Hyun Chul Lee, Bong Soo Cha
Korean Diabetes J. 2005;29(6):540-547.   Published online November 1, 2005
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Type 2 diabetes is characterized by defects in both insulin secretion and insulin action. Type 2 diabetes has a strong genetic basis, and obesity is also known as a important risk factor for development of diabetes. The relative effects of obesity and family history of diabetes (FHx) to develop diabetes have not been well characterized. The aim of this study was to analyze the relative role of insulin resistance and insulin secretion in the newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients according to the presence of FHx and obesity. METHOD: We evaluated the presence of FHx, fasting and postprandial glucose, C-peptide and insulin in 219 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients without the history of drug therapy from Jan. 2003 to Oct. 2004. RESULT: The mean age of patients was 54.7+/-10.2(yr) and the mean BMI was 25.5+/-3.0 kg/m2. The patients with FHx develop diabetes earlier than them without FHx. BMI, fasting glucose, postprandial glucose, fasting C-peptide and HOMAIR value were not different between groups. But postprandial C-peptide, fasting insulin, postprandial insulin and HOMAbeta-cell value were significantly lower in patient with FHx than in them without FHx. Interestingly, obese (BMI > or = 25kg/m2) patients with FHx developed diabetes earlier than nonobese (BMI <25kg/m2) patients with FHx. CONCLUSION: Obesity plays an important role in the determination of the earlier onset of diabetes in patients with FHx. Intentional prevention of obesity may be an important means to prevent, at least delay, the onset of diabetes in the subjects with FHx.
The Association Between White Blood Cell Count and Metabolic Syndrome in Korean Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.
Wan Sub Shim, Hae Jin Kim, Soo Kyung Kim, Shin Ae Kang, Eun Seok Kang, Yu Mie Rhee, Chul Woo Ahn, Sung Kil Lim, Kyung Rae Kim, Hyun Chul Lee, Bong Soo Cha
Korean Diabetes J. 2005;29(5):460-468.   Published online September 1, 2005
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGOUND: Type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and inflammation is also closely associated with cardiovascular disease. The white blood cell count, which is a marker of systemic inflammation, has been found to correlated with the risk of cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between metabolic syndrome and the WBC count in type 2 diabetic patients. METHODS: 606 patients (males 318, females 288, BMI 25.6+/-3.2 kg/m2 and duration of diabetes 4.8+/-5.9year) were enrolled. The WBC and differential counts, anthropometry, blood pressure, fasting glucose, insulin and lipid profiles were measured. RESULTS: According to the quartiles of the WBC count, the number of components of metabolic syndrome and percentage of patients with metabolic syndrome were increased in the highest WBC count quartile. The WBC, neutrophil, lymphocyte, monocyte and eosinophil counts increased with increasing number of components of metabolic syndrome, but not that of the basophil count. The WBC, neutrophil, lymphocyte, monocyte and eosinophil counts were higher in patients with metabolic syndrome than in those without. The WBC count was found to be positively correlated with the waist circumference(gamma=0.090), systolic blood pressure(gamma=0.090), diastolic blood pressure(gamma=0.104), triglyceride(gamma=0.252), insulin(gamma=0.168) and HOMAIR(gamma=0.170), but negatively with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol(gamma= -0.167)(P<0.05, respectively). CONCLUSION: Chronic inflammation, as indicated by a higher than normal WBC count, may increased with the increasing number of components of metabolic syndrome.
Clinical Meaning of Postprandial Insulin Secretory Function in Korean Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.
Wan Sub Shim, Soo Kyung Kim, Hae Jin Kim, Se Eun Park, Eun Seok Kang, Yu Mie Rhee, Chul Woo Ahn, Sung Kil Lim, Kyung Rae Kim, Hyun Chul Lee, Bong Soo Cha
Korean Diabetes J. 2005;29(4):367-377.   Published online July 1, 2005
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BACKGROUND
Impaired pancreatic beta-cell responsiveness is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Postprandial insulin deficiency is closely related with fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c and insulin responses to meals, but most studies examining postprandial beta-cell responsiveness have been limited by the small number of type 2 diabetic patients examined. The aim of this study was to evaluate fasting and postprandial insulin secretions in relation to the duration of diabetes, BMI and glycemic control in a large number of patients with variable disease durations. METHODS: We evaluated the fasting plasma glucose, insulin, C-peptide, HbA1c, BMI, postprandial 2 hour glucose, insulin and C-peptide in 1,170(male 662, female 508, age 54.6+/-1.6 years, duration of diabetes 5.2+/-6.3 years, BMI 25.4+/-3.3kg/m(2)) type 2 diabetic patients. The delta C-peptide, delta insulin, fasting(M0) and postprandial(M1) pancreatic beta-cell responsiveness were also calculated. The subjects were divided into three groups according to their duration of diabetes, BMI, and fasting and postprandial C-peptide levels. After adjusting for age, sex and BMI, the correlation of diabetes and HbA1c were correlated parameters. RESULTS: In the group of patients whose duration of diabetes was longer than 10 years, the BMI, fasting, postprandial and delta C-peptide, and M0 and M1 were significantly lower, but age, fasting and postprandial glucose, as well as HbA1c were significantly higher than those in the other groups. There were no significant differences in the fasting and postprandial glucose and HbA1c according to their fasting C-peptide tertiles. However, in the group of patients with the highest postprandial C-peptide tertile, the fasting and postprandial glucose and HbA1c were significantly lower than those in the other groups. The duration of diabetes, after adjustment of age, sex and BMI, was negatively correlated with the fasting, postprandial and delta C-peptide, M0 and M1, but was positively correlated with the fasting and postprandial 2 hour glucose and HbA1c. The HbA1c after adjustment of age, sex and BMI, was positively correlated with duration of diabetes, and fasting and postprandial glucose, but was negatively correlated with fasting postprandial and delta C-peptide, M0 and M1. CONCLUSION: Although the fasting and postprandial insulin secretions were decreased with duration of diabetes, the decrease in the postprandial insulin secretion was more prominent. The postprandial pancreatic responsiveness may be a more important factor in predicting glycemic control in Korean type 2 diabetic patients than the fasting pancreatic responsiveness.
Analysis of the Relative Importance of Insulin Resistance and Insulin Secretion Defect by Homeostasis Model Assessment in Korean Type 2 Diabetic Patients.
Wan Sub Shim, Soo Kyung Kim, Hae Jin Kim, Jae Hoon Moon, Eun Seok Kang, Yu Mie Rhee, Chul Woo Ahn, Sung Kil Lim, Kyung Rae Kim, Hyun Chul Lee, Bong Soo Cha
Korean Diabetes J. 2005;29(3):206-214.   Published online May 1, 2005
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BACKGROUND
Type 2 diabetes is characterized by defects in both insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. However, the relative importance of insulin secretion and insulin resistance in Korean type 2 diabetic patients has not been well characterized in any study that has included a large number of subjects. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the relative importance of insulin sensitivity and the function of the beta cell in Korean type 2 diabetic patients. METHODS: We applied the HOMA model to 1,162 type 2 diabetic patients (654 males and, 508 females) who did not use insulin and we assessed HOMAIR and HOMAbetacell & its relation to the other parameters. RESULTS: The HOMAIR of Korean type 2 diabetic patients was 2.29(range: 0.31~37.17) and the HOMAbetacell of Korean type 2 diabetic patients was 32.17(range: 1.04~1310.79). The HOMAIR of Korean type 2 diabetic male patients was 2.15(range: 0.31~16.6) and that of Korean type 2 diabetic female patients was 2.47(range: 0.36~37.17). The HOMAbetacell of Korean type 2 diabetic male patients was 30.1(range: 1.04~462.34) and that of Korean type 2 diabetic female patients was 35.42(range: 2.60~1310.79). The HOMAIR and HOMAbetacell were significantly higher in females than males. There was no significant correlation between HOMAIR and age, and the duration of diabetes, but there was significant correlation between HOMAIR and BMI, fasting glucose, HbA1c and the fasting insulin. There was no significant correlation between age and HOMAbetacell. However, there was significant correlation between HOMAbetacell and BMI, the duration of diabetes, the fasting glucose, HbA1c and the fasting insulin. The longer the duration of diabetes, the more the HOMAbetacell was decreased but there was no change of HOMAIR with respect to the duration of diabetes. As expected, the subjects with a lower HOMAIR and a higher HOMAbetacell had the best glycemic control. Those with a higher HOMAIR and lower HOMAbetacell had the worst glycemic control although they had taken larger amount of oral hypoglycemic agents. Interestingly, the patients with a lower HOMAIR and higher HOMAbetacell had better glycemic control than those patients with a higher HOMAIR and lower HOMAbetacell. CONCLUSION: Both insulin secretion and insulin resistance are important in glycemic control but it seems that insulin secretion is a more important factor in glycemic control than insulin resistance in the Korean type 2 diabetic patients
Relationship Between Diabetic Nephropathy and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1.
Bong Soo Cha, Hae Jin Kim
Korean Diabetes J. 2003;27(3):179-185.   Published online June 1, 2003
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Diabetes Metab J : Diabetes & Metabolism Journal