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Eun A Kim  (Kim EA) 4 Articles
The percent change of body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes using rosiglitazone for 1 year.
Seong Bin Hong, Hwi Ra Park, Eun A Kim, Kyung wook Lee, Moonsuk Nam, Yong Seong Kim
Korean Diabetes J. 2006;30(1):47-53.   Published online January 1, 2006
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/jkda.2006.30.1.47
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Rosiglitazone(RSG) is known as a potent agonist for the PPARgamma. It improves glycemic control by improving insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissues. And it is associated with body weight gain. The Pro12Ala polymorphism of the gene encoding the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor(PPAR)gamma2 has recently been shown to be associated with insulin sensitivity. This study was performed to evaluate the body weight change during the long term rosiglitazone treatment and the role of PPARgamma2 polymorphism, Pro12Ala as an indicator to predict the clinical response of RSG in type 2 diabetes patients. METHOD: The study subjects were 214 type 2 diabetic patients(117 male, 97 female) who were received a daily 1 year course of 4 mg RSG combined with sulfonylurea or metformin. The Pro12Ala polymorphism of the PPARgamma2 was determined by the restriction fragment length polymorphism(RFLP) method. Body weight, height, waist circumference, fasting glucose, insulin, c-peptide and lipid profile were measured. RESULTS: After RSG treatment, body weight change was 2.4 +/- 3.8%, 4.5 +/- 9.8% of baseline body weight at 12, 24 weeks respectively. Body weight gains were increased to 5.6 +/- 10.1% at the end of 1 year. The HbA1C, serum insulin level and HOMA index were decreased following the rosiglitazone therapy. The allele frequency of the Ala12Pro polymorphism of the PPARgamma2 was 0.016. The number of Ala12Pro variant of the PPARgamma2 was too low to predict clinical response of RSG. Body weight gain was correlated with basal fasting plasma glucose, post-prandial 2 hour glucose and HbA1c level(p<0.05). There was no correlation between baseline body weight and change. CONCLUSION: This results showed that Pro12Ala polymorphism was not acceptable for the predictor of RSG induced weight gain and clinical response. However, body weight gain was increased in who had high glucose level, and correlated positively with glucose decrease. 1st 3 month weight gain was best predictor of weight change during 1 year.
Two Cases of Diabetic Ketoacidosis Associated with Atypical Antipsychotics.
Seung Hee Lee, Kum Ho Yi, Eun A Kim, Seong Bin Hong, Moon Suk Nam, Yong Seong Kim
Korean Diabetes J. 2005;29(6):566-570.   Published online November 1, 2005
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Atypical antipsychotics have been widely used for the management of patients with schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. However, they may be associated with a greater risk of metabolic abnormalities than others, including weight gain, hyperlipidemia, and new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). We report two cases of reversible DKA and new-onset DM that developed in patients treated with atypical antipsychotics. A 42-year-old male patient with schizophrenia who was on olanzapine admitted to the hospital because of DKA. He had been taking olanzapine for 5 months. Five months before the admission, his fasting serum glucose levels were 109 m/dL. Another 34-year-old male with no previous history of diabetes mellitus was admitted to the hospital and subsequently diagnosed with DKA. The patient had been taking risperidone. Clinicians should monitor blood glucose concentrations periodically in patients taking atypical antipsychotics.
Genetic Polymorphism of Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor in Korean Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.
Kyung Wook Lee, Meihua Jiang, Shanji Piao, Eun A Kim, Seong Bin Hong, Moon Suk Nam, Yong Seong Kim, Kyong Soo Park, Hyun Chul Lee
Korean Diabetes J. 2005;29(1):30-38.   Published online January 1, 2005
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a hormone secreted by intestinal L-cells, which stimulates insulin secretion from cells. The biological action of GLP-1 is mediated by the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R), which is 463 amino acids in size, with 7 transmembrane domains. Because GLP-1 plays an important modulatory role in regulating glucose-stimulated insulin, the GLP-1R could be a candidate gene contributing to impaired -cell function and the development of this genetically heterogeneous disorder. Recently, four GLP-1R SNPs were identified in Caucasian diabetic individuals, and for the SNP at the Leu- 260Phe (A/C) position, statistically significant differences were detected in the distribution of genotypes between type 2 diabetic and nondiabetic subjects. We replicated the genetic association between the SNP at the leu260Phe (A/C) position in the GLP-1R gene and Korean type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS: The Leu260Phe polymorphism in the GLP-1R gene was determined using a PCR- RFLP method (the genotypes were determined according to the results of polymerase chain reaction products after digestion and the digestive enzyme was BbsI) in 419 Korean type 2 diabetic patients and 345 nondiabetic subjects. RESULTS: In contrast to the Caucasian report, there was no significant difference in the frequencies of alleles, and genotypes between Korean type 2 diabetic and nondiabetic subjects. When analyzed according to gender, BMI and age of onset, the genotype distribution of type 2 diabetic subjects was not significantly different from nondiabetic subjects. CONCLUSION: The Leu260Phe polymorphism in the GLP-1R gene was not associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and we were unable to replicate the genetic association between this polymorphism and Korean type 2 diabetes mellitus
High Carbohydrate Diet Effects on the Development of Diabetes Mellitus and Modification of Pancreatic Islets in OLETF Rats.
Sung Ki Kim, Seong Bin Hong, Hwi Ra Park, Eun A Kim, Kyung Wook Lee, Moon Suk Nam, Yong Seong Kim
Korean Diabetes J. 2004;28(3):187-198.   Published online June 1, 2004
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Diet has long been believed to be an important risk factor for type 2 diabetes. The composition of carbohydrates in the diet was higher in the past, where as now it is considerably reduced in the diet of Korean peoples, which is probably associated with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The aim of the present study was to investigate the long-term effect of high carbohydrate/low protein diets on the glucose and lipid metabolism and the pancreatic islet in OLETF(Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty) rats, the animal model of type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Seven week old male OLETF rat were fed a high carbohydrate/low protein diet(carbohydrate 71.0%, fat 14.5%, protein 14.5%) as the experimental group, with an ordinary chow diet(carbohydrate 63.5%, fat 14.5%, protein 22%) fed to the controls. The plasma insulin, lipid profiles, free fatty acid and oral glucose tolerance were analyzed at 16 and 32 weeks. After the glucose tolerance test, the pancreas was excised, and immunohistochemical staining was conducted for the islet morphology and insulin mRNA to quantify the insulin secretory capacity. RESULTS: The basal glucose levels tended to be higher in the control group, but with no significant statistical difference. There were no differences in the serum insulin, total cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL-cholesterol and plasma free fatty acid levels between the two groups. The pancreatic islets of the control group showed multilobulation, with fibrotic changes; where as those of the experimental group were maintained normal profiles. A higher expression of insulin mRNA was observed in the experimental than in the control group. CONCLUSION: A high carbohydrate diet induced lower body weight increases, and protected against beta cell injury and decreased the development of abnormal glucose tolerance in OLETF rats. This may explain the growing incidence of diabetes with respect to the change in carbohydrate composition in the diet of Korean peoples. However, whether the protective effect of a high carbohydrate diet, against the development of diabetes in OLETF rats, can be attributed to small weight increases or if the change in food composition itself, or both needs to be determined.

Diabetes Metab J : Diabetes & Metabolism Journal